Water tested everything! What do I do? - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Water tested everything! What do I do?

Water tested everything! What do I do?

This is a discussion on Water tested everything! What do I do? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by TexasTanker Yes, it is a hang on the back kind. I changed the filter three days ago, I'll do that again ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Bala Shark
Bala Shark
Guppy
Guppy
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Water tested everything! What do I do?
Old 05-10-2010, 06:25 AM   #21
 
1077's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTanker View Post
Yes, it is a hang on the back kind. I changed the filter three days ago, I'll do that again now. I'm fixin to scuttle the whole tank and start over. there is no reason for this nitrite to be soooooo damned high.

Material in the filter be it a cartridge,sponge,pad,etc is where the bacteria needed to cycle a tank lives and it IS a living thing. Changing out the material, sponge,pad,cartridge,etc will remove a significant portion of the needed bacteria, so too will washing the material in tapwater containing chlorine.
Filter should not need cleaning too often if feedings are not excessive, and should it ever need cleaning, best to clean it in dechlorinated water or old aquarium water .
Dechlorinator such as PRIME or AMQUEL + and tapwater is all that is needed to add to the aquarium at each water change.
Adding ammonia scavengers such as ammo-lock or similar products can skew the results of some test kits and also slow down the (cycling ) process by robbing the bacteria of food.
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 08:49 AM   #22
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
I am using API Freshwater Master test kit. It is not expired. I'm getting outside tests done today. the place closed before I could get there yesterday.

The 55 Gallon has been running for a week or so with gravel from a cycled tank (kept wet in transit) and plants from a cycled tank (not the nitrite tank). Given the 10g tank's condition I did move my emerald cats and five platy over to the 55. So it is cycling now. I'm not going to stock the 55 with long term residents until it's all the way cycled and I have it planted and set up just the way I want it.

I did another series of tests yesterday, testing the water in the filter of the 10, and the tank water. No good. I am getting a Marineland Penguin 150 for it today. I'm thinking to just scrap it and start over. This will give me a chance to get it moved and set up for one of the kids. The current five fish can go to the big tank while I make the changes then the two guppies can come back for the cycle process.

QUESTION: Can you have too many plants in a tank? Could that be throwing everything off? I've included a recent pic. There are about 15 plants in there.

I will update tonight.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC04415.jpg (69.1 KB, 35 views)
TexasTanker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 03:00 PM   #23
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
I can't say I agree with some of Mr. Sparkle's stocking suggestions for the 55g. Three spot gouramis would work (blue, gold) but I'd only get one as they can be territorial/aggressive with one another. Kissing gouramis can grow up to a foot long so should really be in a bigger tank than a 55g. Clown loaches also grow to well over a foot and are active schoolers so should be in a much larger tank than a 55g.
Typical adult clown loaches are between 7 and 10 inches. While 55-gallon may be pushing it, I've done it before with very little issue. While you feel that it may be generally advisable to house them in a larger space (and your opinion is supportable), saying that they grow "well over a foot" isn't very accurate - the largest one ever was I think 14 inches, or "just over" a foot (and it is not the norm). Similarly, I rarely see kissing gouramis get longer than 9 inches and usually they won't be any more than 6 inches, so 55 gallons is pretty sufficient for these fish. As to the aggression in kissers, it's pretty much limited to the "kissing" wars. You won't even have that if there's just one male in the aquarium with 1 or 2 females.

I don't' have a problem with you disagreeing with me on the recommendations...not at all. I just think you exaggerated a touch on the rationale behind your disagreement.
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2010, 08:10 PM   #24
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
The latests tests.... confused now

TAP WATER:
GH 180
KH 40
PH 7.5
NO2 0
NO3 0
AMMO 0.25

10 GALLON PROBLEM TANK 3 mos old, 3 molly 2 guppy
GH 3
KH 0
PH 7.5
NO2 5.0
NO3 40
AMMO 0~0.25


55 GALLON CYCLING TANK 2 weeks, 5 platy 3 cats
GH 180
KH 40
PH 6.5
NO2 0.5
NO3 0
AMMO 0.5 ~ 1.0

I know to expect the various spikes in the 55 Gallon tank with it cycling. I am doing a 25% water change tomorrow. Can someone give me a run down of the spikes and how they correlate to the cycling process? I am afraid I didn't pay much attention or track anything with the smaller tank and that's why I'm having issues now.

Can someone explain the significance of the GH and KH and how they fluctuate?

Also the PH dropped significantly in the 55 since I last tested. Which leads me to wonder if I got a bum kit to start with? I'm checking their website right now to track the lot numbers.

I was debating on tearing down the ten anyway.... Do you think the five current residents would be okay in the 55 gallon or should I wait until the new 16 gallon tanks are ready to start their cycle on Saturday or Sunday? I don't wanna stress them but if the ten gallon is as toxic as I think it may be, I doubt they'd make it much longer.

On a side note: How to you tell a healthy angel fish from mediocre ones? I saw some today that were really pretty, but I can't tell if they actually look good. Would my 55 be suitable for one or two? After it's cycled and stable of course?

Okay, I think that's all my questions for a few minutes. Thank all of you for answering my questions as I stumble through this.
TexasTanker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 05:36 AM   #25
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Sparkle View Post
Typical adult clown loaches are between 7 and 10 inches. While 55-gallon may be pushing it, I've done it before with very little issue. While you feel that it may be generally advisable to house them in a larger space (and your opinion is supportable), saying that they grow "well over a foot" isn't very accurate - the largest one ever was I think 14 inches, or "just over" a foot (and it is not the norm). Similarly, I rarely see kissing gouramis get longer than 9 inches and usually they won't be any more than 6 inches, so 55 gallons is pretty sufficient for these fish. As to the aggression in kissers, it's pretty much limited to the "kissing" wars. You won't even have that if there's just one male in the aquarium with 1 or 2 females.

I don't' have a problem with you disagreeing with me on the recommendations...not at all. I just think you exaggerated a touch on the rationale behind your disagreement.
I feel that if a fish has the potential to reach a certain size, it's our obligation to keep them in a tank that will support a fish of that size rather than banking on them being smaller specimens. I never said kissing gouramis were aggressive; however, due to their kissing behaviors, they can "annoy" other fish so shouldn't be kept with particularly shy fish or with fish that might misinterpret the kissing behavior as being more aggressive than it really is and react violently. Due to their potential size, I would not keep kissers in anything smaller than a 75g and believe adult clowns should have yet more space, ideally 100+ gallons.
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 10:37 AM   #26
 
1077's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Sparkle View Post
Typical adult clown loaches are between 7 and 10 inches. While 55-gallon may be pushing it, I've done it before with very little issue. While you feel that it may be generally advisable to house them in a larger space (and your opinion is supportable), saying that they grow "well over a foot" isn't very accurate - the largest one ever was I think 14 inches, or "just over" a foot (and it is not the norm). Similarly, I rarely see kissing gouramis get longer than 9 inches and usually they won't be any more than 6 inches, so 55 gallons is pretty sufficient for these fish. As to the aggression in kissers, it's pretty much limited to the "kissing" wars. You won't even have that if there's just one male in the aquarium with 1 or 2 females.

I don't' have a problem with you disagreeing with me on the recommendations...not at all. I just think you exaggerated a touch on the rationale behind your disagreement.

Even at seven inches,a group of clown loaches would be quite uncomfortable in 55 gal. Same for the kissing gouramis. The reason we rarely see specimens attain their potential ,is largely due to fish being kept in tanks that do not allow proper growth and or being kept in improperly maintained smaller tanks or even larger tanks.
Stunted fish are much more commomnly seen in the trade and health issues as a result of stunting often prevent fishes from living long enough to achieve their potential.
Many are those who say... "I'll get a larger tank soon" Some do, and some don't.
I suspect if fishes were puppies or kittens,folks would be more inclined to provide proper enviornments .
Perhaps some day..... Just my two cents.
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 11:18 AM   #27
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I agree with batman and 1077. Here's a link to info on the clown loach from a highly acknowledged site on loaches (contributors include several loach experts in the hobby).
http://www.loaches.com/species-index...a-macracanthus

And a comment on the angelfish question. In a 55g I would go with 4 or 5 angels, plus a group of bottom fish and a groups of shoaling characins (tetras) suitable for angels. Angels are shoaling fish and should be either in a group or in a pair if you can get a male/female mated pair.

Last edited by Byron; 05-11-2010 at 11:24 AM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 12:08 PM   #28
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
Okay, I've poked around and found some fish that i like. No I do not plan on getting all of these. I do especially like the Zebra Danios. But they would exclude the Angel Fish and discus. Which leads to my next question. Can they do well outside of their ideal KH if everything else is ideal? Is the KH more fro breeding purposes?

**1-2** Veiled Angel fish KH 1-5 PH 5.8-7, up to 6" up to 79 degrees

**10** Zebra Danios schoolers KH 8-12 PH 6.5-7 64-75 degrees

**too tricky**Neon Blue Discus KH 1-3 PH 6-7.5 79-86 degrees

**dunno how many** Flame Dwarf Gourami KH 4-10 PH 6-7.5 72-82 degrees

**1 as the very last introduction into the tank** Double full red cockatoo cichlid KH 2-15 PH 5-7 72-86 degrees

Keep tank static around 73-75 degrees. PH between 6.5 -7.0 KH How variable is KH to the fish?
TexasTanker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 12:54 PM   #29
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Some fish are more adaptable than others to differing water parameters (in this discussion, hardness and pH). And being commercially (tank) raised or wild-caught also makes a difference on how "adaptable" they may be.

I personally feel the general hardness (GH) is more important than the carbonate hardness (KH). Some wild-caught fish can adapt to somewhat different hardness and pH, though they may not spawn unless maintained in parameters close if not identical to their habitat. But if the fish are not "comfortable" to the extent they will spawn, I suspect the different parameters may have more significance than some might imagine. We do know that hard water can affect internal organs, causing early demise of what otherwise appear as "healthy" fish.

Temperature is important because it can affect the fish's physiology. For instance, mixing zebra danios with discus would not work--aside from other issues, temperature is here significant. The danios would "burn out" at 82-84F, and conversely the discus would chill out below 80F and likely develop other health issues as a result of being quite simply too cool.

With a pH between 6.5 and 7.0 the hardness is likely going to be soft to moderate. You shouldn't have much trouble with the fish you name from this aspect; but the temperature and behaviours are quite a different matter. Sedate fish like discus and angels do not appreciate boisterous active fish like danios in their tank.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2010, 01:40 PM   #30
 
Mister Sparkle's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1077 View Post
The reason we rarely see specimens attain their potential ,is largely due to fish being kept in tanks that do not allow proper growth and or being kept in improperly maintained smaller tanks or even larger tanks.
.
I'm going to go ahead and say that this isn't exactly true.
Mister Sparkle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
water question deoinized water vs distilled water jaysix79 Saltwater Fish 13 02-08-2010 01:42 AM
Questions on my water conditions. Advice on water changes and liquid fertilizer saulat Beginner Planted Aquarium 13 07-05-2009 05:50 PM
White Cloudy Water + Dead Fish after water change HELP!!! eviltuna Tropical Fish Diseases 8 03-05-2008 12:03 AM
Just had water tested for 1st Time need Help! Bigfoot Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 10 07-02-2007 10:03 AM


Tags
ammo, testing, trates, trites

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:45 AM.