Water changing methods - Page 3 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #21 of 37 Old 03-08-2012, 05:47 AM
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I like to make a comment about bringing up the temperature from the faucet. Are not the tank inhabitants being placed under stress when mixing warm water with cold at the faucet? Water at the hot water supply is usually heated to 120 degrees or more. So at these temperatures, there is no or very little oxygen being added to the oxygenated cold water supply. So the replacement water is lower in oxygen.
My preferance is to fill a standby tank, heat it to temperature and aerate it before adding it to my tank.
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post #22 of 37 Old 03-08-2012, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by rjordan390 View Post
I like to make a comment about bringing up the temperature from the faucet. Are not the tank inhabitants being placed under stress when mixing warm water with cold at the faucet? Water at the hot water supply is usually heated to 120 degrees or more. So at these temperatures, there is no or very little oxygen being added to the oxygenated cold water supply. So the replacement water is lower in oxygen.
My preferance is to fill a standby tank, heat it to temperature and aerate it before adding it to my tank.
It is true that warm water holds less oxygen than cold. But I wouldn't conclude from this that using a mix of warm and cold that is approximately the same temp as the aquarium water is detrimental. In my case, there is more cold than hot water in the mix. I've no factual data on this but I've never observed any issues in my tanks with 50% changes weekly.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #23 of 37 Old 03-08-2012, 03:33 PM
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My house has an oil burner that also supplys hotwater to the faucets. Its more then 20 years old. I can imagine what type of minerals are on the heating coils besides plenty of rust. I think I will stick with my idea.
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post #24 of 37 Old 03-09-2012, 11:22 PM
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I am sure you are tired of hearing opinions but here are mine. I have three tanks (55G 25G 10G) I do a 40% water change every week. I make sure the water temp out of the faucet is the same temp as the tank i am filling. Once the water change is done I then add my chemicals;
Stability and Prime, both by Seachem. Best product I have found. I do not use salt nor have I ever.
I use the recommended amount for the entire tank size.
Unfortunately the house i am renting has a fancy kitchen faucet so I have to use buckets. NOT looking forward to water changes with the new 125G!
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post #25 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 02:23 AM Thread Starter
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I am sure you are tired of hearing opinions but here are mine. I have three tanks (55G 25G 10G) I do a 40% water change every week. I make sure the water temp out of the faucet is the same temp as the tank i am filling. Once the water change is done I then add my chemicals;
Stability and Prime, both by Seachem. Best product I have found. I do not use salt nor have I ever.
I use the recommended amount for the entire tank size.
Unfortunately the house i am renting has a fancy kitchen faucet so I have to use buckets. NOT looking forward to water changes with the new 125G!
Appreciate it
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post #26 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 10:58 AM
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I am sure you are tired of hearing opinions but here are mine. I have three tanks (55G 25G 10G) I do a 40% water change every week. I make sure the water temp out of the faucet is the same temp as the tank i am filling. Once the water change is done I then add my chemicals;
Stability and Prime, both by Seachem. Best product I have found. I do not use salt nor have I ever.
I use the recommended amount for the entire tank size.
Unfortunately the house i am renting has a fancy kitchen faucet so I have to use buckets. NOT looking forward to water changes with the new 125G!
May not be understanding one point here...when you say you add Prime "once the water change is done." If this means after you have refilled the tank, that is dangerous, depending upon how much chlorine/chloramine is in the tap water.

Changing 40% of a tank with heavily chlroinated water can kill the fish quickly. I speak from experience, as I once (and fortunately only once) forgot to add the conditioner when I began to refill a 70g some years back, and within a few minutes I saw the fish gasping at the surface. I instinctively knew what had happened, and dumped in the conditioner, probably three or four times the needed amount. It got things back to normal, but I had half a dozen dead fish by then, and the others were obviously highly stressed. Chlorine burns the gills.

Municipal water supplies add varying amounts, so adding tap water to the tank without adding the conditioner at the start of the refill could harm the fish. And if you have chloramine it is even worse. Ammonia at very low levels (less than 1 ppm) causes internal damage that is usually irreversible.

As I said, it depends where you live and what goes in your water. In North America most jurisdictions add more chlorine than those in the UK for example. I can smell chlorine every time I turn on a tap.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #27 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 11:23 AM Thread Starter
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May not be understanding one point here...when you say you add Prime "once the water change is done." If this means after you have refilled the tank, that is dangerous, depending upon how much chlorine/chloramine is in the tap water.

Changing 40% of a tank with heavily chlroinated water can kill the fish quickly. I speak from experience, as I once (and fortunately only once) forgot to add the conditioner when I began to refill a 70g some years back, and within a few minutes I saw the fish gasping at the surface. I instinctively knew what had happened, and dumped in the conditioner, probably three or four times the needed amount. It got things back to normal, but I had half a dozen dead fish by then, and the others were obviously highly stressed. Chlorine burns the gills.

Municipal water supplies add varying amounts, so adding tap water to the tank without adding the conditioner at the start of the refill could harm the fish. And if you have chloramine it is even worse. Ammonia at very low levels (less than 1 ppm) causes internal damage that is usually irreversible.

As I said, it depends where you live and what goes in your water. In North America most jurisdictions add more chlorine than those in the UK for example. I can smell chlorine every time I turn on a tap.
So add the conditioner (Amount needed to condition the entire tank) to the tank before filling it with the new tap water?

125Gal: 7 Silver Dollars, 1 Albino BN Plecos, 1 Green Terror, 1 Gold Severum, Red Severum, 8 Rio Cahals, and 2 Festivum

55Gal: 3 German Blue Rams, 2 Bolivian Rams, 1 Super Red Pleco, 9 Bloodfin Tetras, and 9 Oto Catfish

29Gal: Quarentine/Hospital Tank

20Gal: Female Pastel Ball Python
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post #28 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 11:40 AM
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So add the conditioner (Amount needed to condition the entire tank) to the tank before filling it with the new tap water?
Yes, or at any rate as soon as you start filling. It somewhat depends upon the tank size. The larger the tank, the more the chlorinated water will spread out. In small tanks like a 10g I always use a pail to refill, and dechlorinate the water i the pail. Bjut I wouldn't push the issue. Add the conditioner before or when the new water starts entering the tank.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #29 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 05:26 PM
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Thank you! I will start adding the Prime before i add the water, always thought it would hurt the fish since their is little water in the tank. Do you use only Prime or stability as well?

If not stability, when if ever should i use it?
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post #30 of 37 Old 03-10-2012, 08:57 PM
New at this WC , taking no chances

I'm new to the larger WC. I thought I'd be able to change 25% a month, NOT, I was still back in the 70's in my thinking. I thank the posters of TFK for my education. The aquarium looks terrific after making these large water changes each week. The fish have also changed colors, deeper richer.

So with the 125 gallon WC , I have a 75 gallon reservoir tank in which I make RO water to a preset line on the side of the reservoir. I then add tap water, approx. 75% of the fill. To this, I add the de chlorinator and take water tests the next day to see if I match PH, Hardness , etc. I test for CL and NH3 . If parameters are correct I plug in a heater the day before the WC to bring the temp to 82. Change day, Saturday, I drain out a window to the garden area. I have a metal rule I place on the side of the Aquarium glass to know where to stop the draining. Then refill using a transfer pump connected to the reservoir tank. So I am changing around 70 gallons of the 125 gallon aquarium each week. I see no stress in any of the fish , and if they are happy, so am I. This is also no lifting, or carrying of water buckets, All a pleasure for me to enjoy, if I don't mind the half hour WC time period, it will be done religiously, that is what counts for me. I don't mind the extra steps either to keep my mind at ease.
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