water changes during cycling - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 4 Old 10-12-2012, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
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water changes during cycling

So I messed up and added too many fish before my cycle was complete, lfs didn't tell me anything about the cycling.

I have maintained somewhat, but am trying to get this tank to cycle already...

So I was wondering, how many water changes can/should I be doing each day while trying to get the tank cycled with fish in it.

BTW it is a 20 gallon long tank, no live plants.
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post #2 of 4 Old 10-13-2012, 04:52 AM
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So I messed up and added too many fish before my cycle was complete, lfs didn't tell me anything about the cycling.

I have maintained somewhat, but am trying to get this tank to cycle already...

So I was wondering, how many water changes can/should I be doing each day while trying to get the tank cycled with fish in it.

BTW it is a 20 gallon long tank, no live plants.
how many fish of what kind of sizes do you have feed a bit less than normal and change about 25% every other day if you have a liquid test kit TEST YOUR TAP WATER

some tap water has the same chemical AMMONIA that the fish waste gives off anything other than minute amounts of it can make cycling a real head ache
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post #3 of 4 Old 10-13-2012, 08:05 AM
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You will want to keep your ammonia level below .05. Test daily and do water changes accordingly.
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post #4 of 4 Old 10-13-2012, 11:28 AM
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Without knowing how many fish and which species, it is difficult to predict what to expect. But ammonia (and nitrite) above zero does affect all fish somewhat; depending upon the level and how long it lasts and the species, some fish will die within hours, some within days, some months down the road... . So the goal as mentioned is to keep ammonia and nitrite next to zero.

Daily water changes of half the tank should be done if either toxin is above zero. Use a conditioner than detoxifies ammonia and nitrite; I am aware of two that do, Seachem's Prime and Aquarium Solutions' Ultimate. These are effective for 24-48 hours according to the manufacturers, so they will handle the toxins immediately and the next day's water change will get rid of some of them, and this continues until both read zero.

Live plants, especially fast-growing ones like stem plants and particularly floating plants, work wonders because they assimilate a lot of ammonia as their source of nitrogen. And nitrite is n ot produced, as it is when nitrifying bacteria are the sole issue.

Byron.
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Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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