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Water Change techniques for larger tanks

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Water Change techniques for larger tanks
Old 08-29-2011, 11:12 AM   #21
 
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One option for those of us that "bucket" fill and are getting too out of shape (or old!) to lift and hold a 5 gallon bucket over the tank rim is to use a small pond pump with a hose attached. Drop pump into bucket with treated water, place end in tank, plug pump in, and voila! No lifting water above the waist. I don't use a pond pump, I prefer to use a couple of 2.5 gallon buckets. I leave one under the sink faucet filling, while I take the second, treat the water and pour in the tank. By the time I return to the bathroom, the second bucket is almost full, so I swap out and repeat...over... and over... and over....

Anything bigger than a 55 and I'd have to find another way to do it
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Old 08-29-2011, 12:16 PM   #22
 
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One option for those of us that "bucket" fill and are getting too out of shape (or old!) to lift and hold a 5 gallon bucket over the tank rim is to use a small pond pump with a hose attached. Drop pump into bucket with treated water, place end in tank, plug pump in, and voila! No lifting water above the waist. I don't use a pond pump, I prefer to use a couple of 2.5 gallon buckets. I leave one under the sink faucet filling, while I take the second, treat the water and pour in the tank. By the time I return to the bathroom, the second bucket is almost full, so I swap out and repeat...over... and over... and over....

Anything bigger than a 55 and I'd have to find another way to do it
Yeah, luckily that's not an issue for me yet, and with 100 gallons between all my tanks it gets tiresome, so i am seriously going to try and get a hose on my tap!
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Old 08-29-2011, 01:10 PM   #23
 
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With my latest tank that I set up I now have over 100 gallons of water going. Just purchased the Lee water changer. It has definitly made things easier.
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Old 08-29-2011, 02:30 PM   #24
 
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I have got my tank cleaning down to a science now, which is why I do such often and large water changes. I actually have 2 siphon/python's. One I begin cleaning the tank and then when I have that one done, I start the second tank while the first one is filling with the second hose/siphon. Works wonderful and it is so quick. Gone are the days of lugging buckets of dirty fish water and slipping on the water I drip along the way. I also just add the PRIME to the water as I am refilling and my fish swim happily though the stream as well. I also have chlorinated water and the fish seem very healthy and happy. The PRIME is a life saver. I remember as a kid having to set water out the say before to do the tanks. NOT convenient or efficient.
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Old 08-30-2011, 07:49 PM   #25
 
After my kitchen faucet could not be adapted for a hose, I felt I'd wait until I got a new faucet. After this thread, I decided to pull the aerator on my bathroom sink (nearly the same distance as the kitchen from the tank, just up the stairs). So for $6 I got the hose adapter so I too will be filling from a hose instead of the bucket brigade ....having the slight advantage that my well is not chlorinated. This is great!
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Old 08-31-2011, 09:35 AM   #26
 
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After my kitchen faucet could not be adapted for a hose, I felt I'd wait until I got a new faucet. After this thread, I decided to pull the aerator on my bathroom sink (nearly the same distance as the kitchen from the tank, just up the stairs). So for $6 I got the hose adapter so I too will be filling from a hose instead of the bucket brigade ....having the slight advantage that my well is not chlorinated. This is great!
Good that you where able to figure a way to make things work out. Even with only one set of water changes with the hose, I have found that it sooo much easier. While I was draining out my big tank I was able to work on cleaning one of my fry tanks that was next to it. Love it when able to multi task
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Old 08-31-2011, 10:13 AM   #27
 
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Good that you where able to figure a way to make things work out. Even with only one set of water changes with the hose, I have found that it sooo much easier. While I was draining out my big tank I was able to work on cleaning one of my fry tanks that was next to it. Love it when able to multi task
In my case, I'll only use the faucet hose adapter for filling tanks and will continue to siphon out the front door on the lawn/in the flower bed. I had the Plython/Aqueon type adaptor in days of old when I had a water bed and thought the sink siphon to be a huge waste of water if you can otherwise siphon~ Since I'll be using the upstairs faucet and my system pressure is 30-60 psi, it wouldn't work well anyway.
Besides, I saved money by getting a $6 adaptor and using a standard garden hose. My only worry with the hose fill is that I may be tempted to multi-task and fill one tank while siphoning the other...
Efficient, but comes with a slight [overflow] risk - sometimes focus beats multi-task
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Old 08-31-2011, 10:20 AM   #28
 
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Siphoning out the front door is not an option with living in an apartment. Also had tried starting the siphoning and then turning off the water, have read that it has worked for other people, unfortunately did not work in my case.
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Old 08-31-2011, 11:55 AM   #29
 
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Siphoning out the front door is not an option with living in an apartment. Also had tried starting the siphoning and then turning off the water, have read that it has worked for other people, unfortunately did not work in my case.
Yes, in order for a siphon to work the exit needs to be lower than the inlet with some 'head' (same reason a canister filter needs to be below a tank). Most sinks are at about the same level as most tanks on stands, making a siphon alone impossible - hence it uses the water pressure from the running water to draw [tank] water from the hose.
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Old 08-31-2011, 11:59 AM   #30
 
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Yes my sink is actually higher than my 50 gallon tank, it is on a low stand.
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