Water change help Please read
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Water change help Please read

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Water change help Please read
Old 02-10-2013, 04:31 AM   #1
 
Water change help Please read

I was wondering, sense most people say change your water ever week or so in a 29 gallon tank. Could I run a hose from my spring water, which is 6ph not hard water, no chemicals, and let it drip in say a gallon a day. Then have another hose draining it a gallon a day. Would this be healthy for the fish, considering most live in a high water exchange rate place naturally. I understand i would need a nice heater, to keep the water at 75 80, sense my water comes out at like 40 degrees f. Would this be a good idea though, instead of changing my water every 7 days. There has gotta be a way to make a tank a self contained bio sphere with no out side help, once it set up . Btw my tank is 29 gallons, i plan on putting mollys, and bettas in it when its done cycling. Thank you very much for reading and any help you could offer. Also its not really the work or tie involved in changing the water im trying to avoid, its my concern about spreading fish tb around, considering i have kids. And ive read a case where i child got it from coming in contact with the water. So the least amount of contact with the water is what im looking for.

Last edited by makasouleater; 02-10-2013 at 04:49 AM..
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Old 02-10-2013, 04:36 AM   #2
 
Also, the betta and mollies arent set in stone. I know bettas dont like moving water, so i might just get rid of them, 90 percent sure i will. So i would be getting some fish that liked fast moving water. Sense my tank is already bad for them, because i have a power head, and 2 blubbers, which i want to keep.
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Old 02-10-2013, 05:26 AM   #3
 
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I don't see a problem with that, as long as you keep in mind that your heater might kick in more often with the daily changes..
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Old 02-10-2013, 08:28 AM   #4
 
Sure, it's been done....often using drip irrigation emitters and an overflow:

Here's a simple overflow design:

Drip...drip...drip like a leaky faucet. The heater will work more and you may need additional wattage - I use two heaters in my tank, each capable of maintaining tank temp (and I do manual water changes).
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Old 02-10-2013, 11:50 AM   #5
 
+1

basically you're doing an open system which means you tank will be more dependant on the input water quality as opposed to whatever is happening in the tank.

I do closed systems where the tank processes are controlling.
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Old 02-10-2013, 01:15 PM   #6
 
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What about siphoning the gravel/sand, though? You'd have a lot of fish poo/uneaten food build up in there, that could cause a problem even with the constant water change IMO.
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Old 02-10-2013, 02:26 PM   #7
 
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Welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

A continual flow of water in and out of the tank, 24/7, would be fine, provided the incoming water remains stable with respect to its parameters. You would want to exchange more than a gallon a day, and I personally would not go down this road. There is also the substrate issue mentioned in the last post.

Turning to another issue though, I would not have the common molly in soft water; these fish must have medium hard or harder water. And a basic, not acidic, pH (above 7). Your water sounds ideal for Betta splendens (though this is not a community fish). A 29g with soft water could house many softy water fish.

We have fish profiles, second heading from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page. Water parameters are included for each species, so you might want to browse the profiles for some ideas. You can click the shaded names of fish to see that profile.

Byron.
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Old 02-10-2013, 08:13 PM   #8
 
Actually Byron, I dunno - there would seem to be merit in the continuous flow method as assuming good quality source water, it would constantly and ever so slowly refresh the water, rather than say the weekly 50% water change.
Although it may not be practical for small aquariums (e.g. proper supply line, overflow and drain) it does more closely represent freshwater in nature that is most often infused constantly rather than once weekly. I can see the greatest value in very large aquariums and it plays to the desire to automate a routine task.

I think there is less substrate concern if sand is used instead of gravel, even if a layer of mulm exists to decompose and feed the plants. Besides, there's nothing that says this can't also be siphoned off at some point.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:25 AM   #9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
Actually Byron, I dunno - there would seem to be merit in the continuous flow method as assuming good quality source water, it would constantly and ever so slowly refresh the water, rather than say the weekly 50% water change.
Although it may not be practical for small aquariums (e.g. proper supply line, overflow and drain) it does more closely represent freshwater in nature that is most often infused constantly rather than once weekly. I can see the greatest value in very large aquariums and it plays to the desire to automate a routine task.

I think there is less substrate concern if sand is used instead of gravel, even if a layer of mulm exists to decompose and feed the plants. Besides, there's nothing that says this can't also be siphoned off at some point.
Thank you so much for everything, that helped a lot. I think im going to do it. I changed from the mollies like and bettas which was suggested. I want to get river fish. But first thing is to cycle the tank, which i am just on the 5th day, with ammonia at 2ppm. Hopefully when i hook the over flow system up it doesnt slow it down, but im not in a hurry so. Thanks again for everything
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:18 AM   #10
 
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For 29 gal, I might consider Swordtail's,White cloud mountain minnow's, Small danio's,Hillstream loaches.
These fish would appreciate moderate to strong flow,but as Byron has noted,,don't really appreciate soft water.(with exception of loaches)
You could add buffer to increase the hardness, but it may not be needed if you have access to other water besides the spring.?
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