Water change a fish death - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 10-17-2012, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
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Water change a fish death

Did about a 50% water change to my tank a 50 gallon 4 feet long. When all was done found one of my Harlequin Rasbora had died. It had white cloudy stuff around it my readings before the change were ph7 ammonia .25ppm nitrite between .50ppm and .25ppm nitrate 0. After the water change ph0 ammonia just over 0 nitrite 0. Used seachem prime and top fin bacteria supplement in the water I changed. Added seachem flourish to the tank for the plants. The water temp was about 5 degrees higher than the tank water. I keep my tank at 72 degrees. I don't understand why this happened. The other fish seem ok just a little stress looking swimming around quickly. It was weird it had white stuff on it when it floated up.
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post #2 of 8 Old 10-17-2012, 09:32 PM
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When I do my water changes I try to replace the water to the exact same temperature. Add the plant fertilizer to the tank one day after the water change. If you have time under the tab " freshwater articles" Byron has written a great post titled "regular partical water changes". Check it out its rightous.
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post #3 of 8 Old 10-17-2012, 09:42 PM
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Agreed, you easily be on a 2x a week fertilizer schedule and on day 7 do your water change. De-chlor wipes out fertilizers so don't do them on the same day or you are wasting your money and product.
I Fert on Mon and Thurs, then water change on Sun. 3,3,1 days.
Also ALWAYS match your water temperature to within 1-2 degrees, no more than that. As close as possible. It is highly stressful and will cause death. I tend to have the temp slightly lower as this is like a natural cleansing rain. This can also help a Female to drop her fry.
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post #4 of 8 Old 10-17-2012, 10:07 PM Thread Starter
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Yea I made rookie mistakes this my first one. How do you guys poor water back into the tank? I got 5 gallon buckets I used I pored them in one theory I have I crushed the fish. I read from other water change deaths like 5 die at a time.
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post #5 of 8 Old 10-18-2012, 10:07 AM
Is there a reason you are maintaining the temperature at 72F when most tropicals prefer 76-78F ?

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post #6 of 8 Old 10-18-2012, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
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Is there a reason you are maintaining the temperature at 72F when most tropicals prefer 76-78F ?
My heater would have the temp about 2 degrees higher it seems to be steadily balancing out. Ill raise it to 76 and see if it stays there
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post #7 of 8 Old 10-18-2012, 01:44 PM
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On the heater, do you mean the temp setting is 72, or the tank temp is 72? You should have a good thermometer in the tank to keep aware of the temperature.

I agree with what others have mentioned. I usually add water that is 1 or 2 degrees cooler (by hand) as this stimulates the fish like a tropical rainstorm. Unless you have very sensitive species (chocolate gourami or something) this works fine.

To the dead fish, this does not sound like it was related to the water change. The "white cloudy" is perhaps fungus, or it may be a washing out of the fish's colour; in either case, this means the fish was dead in the tank probably for several hours, perhaps a day or two. A fish being killed and removed within a few minutes will not appear like this.

You can pour the fresh water into the tank from a bucket; this is unlikely to harm the fish unless it is weakened by something to begin with. But one option is to use the siphon hose to refill from the pail; if you can place the pail above the level of the tank top, it is easy to use the hose to siphon the water into the tank. I used to do this until I got my Python, and found it disturbed the aquascape less than pouring from a pail which is more difficult to control. Another thing I now do with my 10g which is too small for a Python is to prepare the pail of water, then use one of those plastic pitchers [solely for aquarium use] that hold a quart or so of water to scoop out some water from the larger pail and pour it more gently into the tank.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 8 Old 10-18-2012, 02:09 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
On the heater, do you mean the temp setting is 72, or the tank temp is 72? You should have a good thermometer in the tank to keep aware of the temperature.

I agree with what others have mentioned. I usually add water that is 1 or 2 degrees cooler (by hand) as this stimulates the fish like a tropical rainstorm. Unless you have very sensitive species (chocolate gourami or something) this works fine.

To the dead fish, this does not sound like it was related to the water change. The "white cloudy" is perhaps fungus, or it may be a washing out of the fish's colour; in either case, this means the fish was dead in the tank probably for several hours, perhaps a day or two. A fish being killed and removed within a few minutes will not appear like this.

You can pour the fresh water into the tank from a bucket; this is unlikely to harm the fish unless it is weakened by something to begin with. But one option is to use the siphon hose to refill from the pail; if you can place the pail above the level of the tank top, it is easy to use the hose to siphon the water into the tank. I used to do this until I got my Python, and found it disturbed the aquascape less than pouring from a pail which is more difficult to control. Another thing I now do with my 10g which is too small for a Python is to prepare the pail of water, then use one of those plastic pitchers [solely for aquarium use] that hold a quart or so of water to scoop out some water from the larger pail and pour it more gently into the tank.

Byron.
Both the temp of the water is 72 and the heater is set to 72. Before I did the water change I counted the fish all present. As soon as I was done seen one dead. Yea I'm going to get a smaller bucket to refill the tank slower.
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