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Very Cloudy Water

This is a discussion on Very Cloudy Water within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Thank you so much for all of your insight. I took another picture for you to take a look at with the tank lights ...

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Old 03-18-2012, 12:41 PM   #21
 
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Thank you so much for all of your insight. I took another picture for you to take a look at with the tank lights off. I will do a water change today because it has been 9 days since the last one and will thoroughly vacuum the gravel and rinse the media. Let me know what you think of the picture.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:26 PM   #22
 
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Well, the light is off...
Let's see a photo after you do the cleaning. Be thorough.
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Old 03-18-2012, 11:00 PM   #23
 
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Will do. I will do all of this tomorrow after work. Also, I just thought of this. Could the dye perhaps from the fake plants be leeching, is this a possibility?
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Old 03-19-2012, 12:04 PM   #24
 
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Originally Posted by Fishoutofwater View Post
Will do. I will do all of this tomorrow after work. Also, I just thought of this. Could the dye perhaps from the fake plants be leeching, is this a possibility?
Not if they are made for use in an aquarium, but otherwise possibly. Though I'm still thinking bacteria from earlier info and photos.
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:57 AM   #25
 
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Ok, whew, done. I vacuumed every squar inch of that gravel. I rinsed off the foam pad and carbon from the Aquaclear REAL good in clean dechlorinated well water. I scrubbed the glass even though it's clean lol. And i did a 30% WC as well.

About 10 minutes after all this was done there was no difference whatsoever. A couple hours later, MAYBE a little difference but not too noticeable. This picture is the water i siphoned out during the WC. If that's not green then i'm 7 foot tall lol. What options do you suggest at this point? Give it more time(The filter is flowing 100%, i had it turned down a littler before), try another blackout, UV, Phosphate remover, add more live plants, etc? Thanks.
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Old 03-20-2012, 02:29 AM   #26
 
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I ,might consider UV sterilizer were it me considering blackout brought no relief.
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:06 AM   #27
 
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Yes, that is green. Here is what Steve Hamilton (to give credit) writes of this:

Green water (algae bloom) Beautifully made photo by Ron© .
This is the most common problem if the cloudy situation extends beyond 10-14 days. Note that "green water" is not always green in appearance! Since green water is the most common problem and the most difficult to solve the answer needs to reflect several options. The situation that causes GW (Green Water) is usually a combination of high nitrates, phosphates, and mixed in some ammonia/ammonium. Substrate disturbance is usually the culprit. What happens is the algae (GW form) will flourish off of the ammonia/ammonium and phosphate, remembering that algae can consume phosphate easier than plants because of their thin cell walls, the algae uses up the ammonia/ammonium and phosphate, but it doesn't go away...because algae can quickly switch with nutrient it scavenges...it moves to nitrates. So you can see why water changes will not rid a tank of GW. Nutrients can be reduced very low in GW and fairly quickly by the GW algaes, but they can scavenge other nutrients...iron and trace elements. So, it's very common for the GW to solve the situation that causes it to begin with, but that won't eliminate the GW, for the reasons I've allude to. Five methods exist to eliminate GW. Blackout, Diatom Filtering, UV Sterilization, Live Daphnia, and Chemical algaecides/flocculents. The first four cause no harm to fish, the fifth one does.
Method No. 1 The blackout means covering the tank for 4 days, no light whatsoever is allowed into the tank during this time. Cover the tank completely with blankets or black plastic trash bags. Be prepared, killing the algae will result in dead decaying algae that will decompose and pollute the water. Water changes are needed at the beginning and end of the blackout time and ammonia should be monitored also.
Method No. 2 Diatom filters can usually be rented from your LFS. This is my preferred method. Personally, I use my Magnum 350 w/Micron Cartridge coated with diatom powder. Diatom filtering removes the algae and doesn't allow it to decay in the tank. You do have to check the filter often, if you have a really bad case of GW the filter can clog pretty quick. Just clean it and start it up again. Crystal clear water usually takes from a few minutes to a couple of hours.
Method No. 3 UV Sterilizers will kill free floating algaes. They also kill free floating parasites and bacteria. They also can be problematic for extended use in a planted tank, as they will cause the “breakdown” of some important nutrients. They are expensive and don't remove the decaying material from the tank, if you can afford to keep one they are handy to have around, though not as useful IMO as a diatom filter.
Method No. 4 Adding live daphnia to your tank. This can be a bit tricky. First you need to insure that you are not adding other "pests" along with the daphnia. Second, unless you can separate the daphnia from the fish, the fish will likely consume the daphnia before the daphnia can consume all the green water.

[Ed: I left the last method (#5) out, since I do not condone harming fish no matter what the problem.]
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Old 03-20-2012, 11:35 AM   #28
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Yes, that is green. Here is what Steve Hamilton (to give credit) writes of this:

Green water (algae bloom) Beautifully made photo by Ron© .
This is the most common problem if the cloudy situation extends beyond 10-14 days. Note that "green water" is not always green in appearance! Since green water is the most common problem and the most difficult to solve the answer needs to reflect several options. The situation that causes GW (Green Water) is usually a combination of high nitrates, phosphates, and mixed in some ammonia/ammonium. Substrate disturbance is usually the culprit. What happens is the algae (GW form) will flourish off of the ammonia/ammonium and phosphate, remembering that algae can consume phosphate easier than plants because of their thin cell walls, the algae uses up the ammonia/ammonium and phosphate, but it doesn't go away...because algae can quickly switch with nutrient it scavenges...it moves to nitrates. So you can see why water changes will not rid a tank of GW. Nutrients can be reduced very low in GW and fairly quickly by the GW algaes, but they can scavenge other nutrients...iron and trace elements. So, it's very common for the GW to solve the situation that causes it to begin with, but that won't eliminate the GW, for the reasons I've allude to. Five methods exist to eliminate GW. Blackout, Diatom Filtering, UV Sterilization, Live Daphnia, and Chemical algaecides/flocculents. The first four cause no harm to fish, the fifth one does.
Method No. 1 The blackout means covering the tank for 4 days, no light whatsoever is allowed into the tank during this time. Cover the tank completely with blankets or black plastic trash bags. Be prepared, killing the algae will result in dead decaying algae that will decompose and pollute the water. Water changes are needed at the beginning and end of the blackout time and ammonia should be monitored also.
Method No. 2 Diatom filters can usually be rented from your LFS. This is my preferred method. Personally, I use my Magnum 350 w/Micron Cartridge coated with diatom powder. Diatom filtering removes the algae and doesn't allow it to decay in the tank. You do have to check the filter often, if you have a really bad case of GW the filter can clog pretty quick. Just clean it and start it up again. Crystal clear water usually takes from a few minutes to a couple of hours.
Method No. 3 UV Sterilizers will kill free floating algaes. They also kill free floating parasites and bacteria. They also can be problematic for extended use in a planted tank, as they will cause the “breakdown” of some important nutrients. They are expensive and don't remove the decaying material from the tank, if you can afford to keep one they are handy to have around, though not as useful IMO as a diatom filter.
Method No. 4 Adding live daphnia to your tank. This can be a bit tricky. First you need to insure that you are not adding other "pests" along with the daphnia. Second, unless you can separate the daphnia from the fish, the fish will likely consume the daphnia before the daphnia can consume all the green water.

[Ed: I left the last method (#5) out, since I do not condone harming fish no matter what the problem.]
Thanks Byron for sharing that. Very informative!
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:01 PM   #29
 
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that is horrible , most likely cause over feeding , lack of vacuuming gravel with every water change , to much direct sun light , not changing filter often enough .

recommendations 3/4 water change including a major gravel vacuuming , use a green scotch bright pad on glass , add a small amount of aquarium salt 1 rounded teaspoon per 5 gal (Not table salt) it will help kill algae I wouldn't be surprised if you have those small nasty snails it will help kill them too also maintain your PH , repeat all above in a week but this time only use 1/2 of the amount of aquarium salt aquarium salt avail at walmart and your LFS and just a FYI the aquarium salt is for fresh water tanks I have used it over 30 years never had any annoying snails or algae and fish are as healthy and happy as could be
best of luck to you

Last edited by SEAWEED54; 03-20-2012 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:49 PM   #30
 
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I would not add salt to a tank with soft water fish no matter what the reason; the stress this places on such fish is not worth the risk. Also, snails will help to prevent this, since they consume a lot of organics and quicken the breakdown process for bacteria. Snails (those little Malaysian Livebearing and common pond types) are the aquarist's friends.
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