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VerdantGrotto's Fresh-Water Habitat

This is a discussion on VerdantGrotto's Fresh-Water Habitat within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> This works with MarineLand's Biowheel 350 Filter. It will probably work with other filters as well. As long as the filter pad holds up ...

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VerdantGrotto's Fresh-Water Habitat
Old 01-29-2013, 06:50 PM   #91
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

This works with MarineLand's Biowheel 350 Filter. It will probably work with other filters as well. As long as the filter pad holds up I expect to get about 3 to 6 months out of each rebuild.

Step 1 - Remove used filter from unit and rinse thoroughly. It doesn't have to be perfectly clean because all your going to need is the plastic structure.
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Old 01-29-2013, 06:55 PM   #92
 
Filter rebuild to Save Money

Step 2 - Tear all of the fabric off of the plastic housing. If some is left around the rim this is fine. Once this is accomplished rinse all of the old Carbon off of the housing.
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Old 01-29-2013, 06:58 PM   #93
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

Step 3 - Using a razor blade or a knife place the plastic housing on a firm surface and scrape all of the remaining filter fabric and glue off of the plastic housing. (Be careful not to cut yourself)
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:03 PM   #94
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

Step 4 - Using a Pond Filter Pad ( I purchased 12" x 15' from Amazon for 20$ ) cut a square that is slightly larger than the plastic filter housing. I left about a 1/4" to a 1/2 an inch on each side which was actually straight down the middle of the 12" wide filter pad.
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:09 PM   #95
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

Step 5 - Obtain some fishing line and a small drill bit. The Lbs test of the line shouldn't matter but I wouldn't use anything less than 8 lbs test because it could snap while your working with it.
Take the drill bit and drill holes along the flat outer perimeter of the plastic housing. I spaced the holes approximately 1/4" to 1/2" apart from each other. (1/4" along the bottom and 1/2" along the top)
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:14 PM   #96
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How's the Cory doing?

I missed the last few days posts and saw your fiasco with the mopani wood fungus. I did have something that appeared similar and I dropped 4 tiger snails onto the wood. They cleaned it up and there is no sign of it. Of course that doesn't mean it was the same thing at all, sometimes it's harmless, sometimes it's not.

Jeff.
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:24 PM   #97
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

Step 6 - Using the fishing line and a medium sized sewing needle, attach the filter pad to the plastic housing with the "tacky side" out. I accomplished this by tying a large knot to bottom out one end of the line in the housing (It won't allow the line to fully pass through the drilled holes). It is also beneficial to start at one of the top corners and transcend down and around to the other top corner. I also left a few inches open on the top side so I could introduce filter media to the cartridge. The sewing portion of this task is simple. With the needle halfway down the fish line, take the two ends and tie them together (This is where you make the large knot to keep the line from passing through the hole). Then simply stick the needle through the next drilled hole ensuring that it also passes through a decent amount of filter pad. Before pulling the string tight, pass the needle through the loop created from one hole to the next. Repeat this process until the end and simply tie the fishing line securely to the plastic cartridge housing. (One could also google how to sew if the above steps don't make sense)
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:30 PM   #98
 
Filter Rebuild to Save Money

Step 7 - Rinse thoroughly and introduce any filter media desired. One could seal the opening up if preferred to prevent any spilling during cleaning the filter. I left mine open... I hope to get quite a few miles out of each rebuild. But if not, the entire length (15' of pad) cost 20$. This is a huge savings considering cartridges are about 20$ for a 6 pack at the LFS
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:36 PM   #99
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDM View Post
How's the Cory doing?

I missed the last few days posts and saw your fiasco with the mopani wood fungus. I did have something that appeared similar and I dropped 4 tiger snails onto the wood. They cleaned it up and there is no sign of it. Of course that doesn't mean it was the same thing at all, sometimes it's harmless, sometimes it's not.

Jeff.
Unfortunately the Cory didn't make it. It was the only casualty that occured. I did however remove the Mopani driftwood and scrub it thoroughly. I even boiled it for about two hours thinking i might return it to the tank. I ultimately thought better of the idea and got an artificial piece that will serve nicely for a cave. The driftwood is going to be repurposed by my wife with something called air plants...

To put it shortly, Less one Pepper Cory, Plus one Decoration...

I did 50% water changes for two days and nervously watched the tank like a hawk. Pretty sure I lost a few years off my life...

There are a few new pictures in my Aquariums Log if you'd like to take a look
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:11 PM   #100
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That's too bad.

Boiling won't fix a fungus problem, it is tough and in the wood in such a way as to be almost impossible to remove. I had read that before trying mine. I boiled and boiled, once for 6 hours straight and I still ended up with a, thankfully, benign fungus that was relatively easy to deal with.

I also put in a piece of Malaysian drift wood and it never had anything show up. Darker and not quite as "picturesque" but wood none the less. It's supposed to be far less prone to issues.

Jeff.
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