Are two filters better than one?
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Are two filters better than one?

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Are two filters better than one?
Old 04-17-2007, 10:26 AM   #1
 
Are two filters better than one?

My present tank comprises of a medium sized bala shark, 3 small angels, a plec, some small bottom feeders, a pearl gourami, 3 thick lip gouramis and a guppy.

I have these annoying particles floating around in the tank and it's bothering me. It is a Hagen duo deep 800 and is powered by a fluval 205 but I am beginning to think the 205 is not a good filter. After taking advice, I have changed my filter media around and I am hoping for an improvement. However, my feeling is that it won't get better. I have done lots of water changes. It just seems to me the water isn't filtering around the tanks fast enough. I have cleaned all the filter out including the pipes- messy job!

Would anyone recommend a second filter like a fluval 3 or 4 to improve the set up? Perhaps I am being to fussy.

Any advice appreciated.
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Old 04-17-2007, 11:41 AM   #2
 
How big is your tank?
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Old 04-17-2007, 12:01 PM   #3
 
size

80(L) x 35(D)x 45(H)
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Old 04-17-2007, 10:22 PM   #4
 
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Re: size

Quote:
Originally Posted by me12
80(L) x 35(D)x 45(H)
Is that in inches?:)

I prefer to add more filters than what is often necessary.
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Old 04-19-2007, 01:04 PM   #5
 
size

it's centremeters, I was brought up during the change over and never learnt either properly. It said cm on the box anyway.
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Old 04-20-2007, 03:08 AM   #6
 
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Re: size

Quote:
Originally Posted by me12
it's centremeters, I was brought up during the change over and never learnt either properly. It said cm on the box anyway.
Your tank is 31 gallons. Does your tank have any cover glass? The way you said there are particles floating makes me think they are dust. Is there surface agitation in your tank? It can help get rid of unsightly particles floating around.
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Old 04-20-2007, 08:59 AM   #7
 
particles in water

Hi again

my particles are in the water. I don't really notice what's floating on the top. I think I have decided to try an additional filter. I am suspicious about the fluval 205 that it's not circulating the water properly through the filter media, by default of its design. My old eheim has a water intake at the bottom and an outlet at the top, so there is no way the debris can get through without going through the filter media, but with my 205 I am not convinced the same is the case.

Regards
Mark
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Old 04-20-2007, 09:04 PM   #8
 
I am one who believes more is better. I have always tried to provide maximum filtration. I, too, have a 30g tank in which I have (2) Marineland 660r powerheads (w/ a ugf), a Penguin 350 power filter, and (2) Fluval 3 internal power filters. This setup filters around 800gph. That is alot. Multiple filtration systems are, seemingly the best way to go. More is better than to little.
I did run into a problem a while back with one of my larger tanks. I could not get it to cycle and clear up. I kept having bacteria die offs that clouded the water. I downsized my powerheads and the problem was solved. I guess that there is such a thing as too much filtration. I was using a relatively newly revived concept called reverse flow. Reverse flow is best described as running the water flow in reverse from normal powerhead operation (thus the r in the Marineland 660r).The water flow from the powerheads was too much for the bio bed in the gravel. By going to less powerful powerheads, I was able to correct the problem.
Many do not understand the principles and ideas behind reverse flow filtration. I do plan on writing an article in the near future explaing the process and its benefits. Keep an eye out.
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Old 04-23-2007, 03:28 AM   #9
 
thanks

Thanks, herefishy, I guess that really must be my answer. I will look for your article. I don't know anything about power heads, though.
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Old 04-23-2007, 04:16 AM   #10
 
Incidentally, I am thinking of getting a fluval 4 1000 litre per hour filter to add to the tank. Would that works as well as a powerhead? As far as I can see powerheads seem to be designed more for undergravel filteration.
Regards
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