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Tropical Fish Food - Take 2

This is a discussion on Tropical Fish Food - Take 2 within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I kind of compare this with dog food. If you compare premium dog foods (Foods that dont have "meal" as the first ingredient) to ...

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Tropical Fish Food - Take 2
Old 11-23-2011, 01:27 PM   #21
 
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I kind of compare this with dog food.

If you compare premium dog foods (Foods that dont have "meal" as the first ingredient) to some of the cheaper brands that use meal you will notice that the serving size is much smaller in the premium food.

From my understanding, "cheap" foods use a lot of filler ingredients that really do nothing for the animal other than fill them up. Because of this, they will poop A LOT more than the same dog on premium food. The dog absorbs a lot more of the nutrients from the premium dog food and therefore there are less wastes.


From my own experience, I had my dog on cheap store brand food for a year. After doing some research I switched over to a premium dog food. A few weeks later, my dogs fur is softer and more shiny, he pooped SO much less, and had a ton more energy.

I know we are talking about fish food here, but this is the reason I go for omega one. Ive seen the difference "meal" heavy foods vs "whole food" ingredients can have on my dog. It just makes sense to me to feed my fish with the same idea in mind.
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:43 PM   #22
 
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Yes! JBroFish, that was and is my thinking, too. And I've found articles to back that thinking up. (See my previous post.) I've been reading that there's a whole world of difference between regular "fish meal" (read:bones and offal) and "whole fish meal". Seriously, read that article I posted, I found it to be the most concise explanation of all the other stuff I was reading.
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:45 PM   #23
 
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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
My research suggested that not all fish meal is created equally. Lower grades are fish or fish parts (heads, bones, guts) of undefined fish species. Higher grades are made from whole fish of specific species.
Exactly my point; that quality fish meal is a good thing. Martha Stewart would probably say "it's a good thing". And this guy definitely says it is:

http://www.thefishsite.com/articles/...aculture-diets

BTW, just to fan the flames, I will contend that Omega, who lists the first ingredient as whole salmon, is just using that term as a substitute for fish meal! If they didn't process salmon into fish meal, how else would they get it into flake form?

Another BTW, I feed my fish Omega brand flakes (besides other things).

I think we're all just debating marketing semantics.
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Old 11-23-2011, 02:15 PM   #24
 
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PS

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone. Hope you enjoy your turkey meal!
(oh, maybe I should have said turkey dinner)

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Old 11-23-2011, 02:35 PM   #25
 
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Happy Thanksgiving to you! I'll enjoy my Tofurky, thanks.

I guess the bottom line for me, and what I said (or at least meant) way back when in the first thread, is that I buy brands that list whole ingredients. Obviously there is not a whole, intact salmon in my little 2 oz container! They have to make it into fish meal so that it can be package, shipped, and fed. But when I buy brands that list whole ingredients I can be assured that its not the other kind of fish meal.

Its funny this came up, the huge thing that kept me from having aquariums for so long was having to purchase a non-vegetarian product in order to feed my fish. And now I'm advocating killing whole fish. Whew! This makes my head spin!
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Old 11-23-2011, 02:49 PM   #26
 
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Exactly my point; that quality fish meal is a good thing. Martha Stewart would probably say "it's a good thing". And this guy definitely says it is:
http://www.thefishsite.com/articles/...aculture-diets
BTW, just to fan the flames, I will contend that Omega, who lists the first ingredient as whole salmon, is just using that term as a substitute for fish meal! If they didn't process salmon into fish meal, how else would they get it into flake form? Another BTW, I feed my fish Omega brand flakes (besides other things).
I think we're all just debating marketing semantics.
Incorrect - The following is from the OmegaSea.net website:

Ingredients

The Omega One Facility is located on the wild and rugged coastline of Baranof Island in Southeast Alaska. We located our facility here in this remote location because it is the hub of a rich commercial fishing network. We are able to purchase our seafood ingredients directly from commercial fisherman. This is the only way to be competitive with such superior raw materials.

The salmon, herring, shrimp, and other seafood ingredients we use are food grade. The high levels of omega 3 & 6 fatty acids greatly enhance the immune system and make for incredible palatability. The skin on our whole salmon are rich in natural beta carotenes for outstanding color enhancement.

We harvest our own kelp, by hand, along the pristine Alaskan shoreline, far removed from any area of human habitation. Rich in vitamins and minerals, nothing can compare to this level of freshness.

Using fresh, cold water marine proteins and kelp, as ingredients, instead of fishmeal and a whole lot of starch (like everyone else) puts Omega One light years ahead of any other fish food on the market. It truly is the “Best Fish Food in the World”



AD
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Old 11-23-2011, 03:34 PM   #27
 
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Yup, direct from their marketing department.....

If it's on the internet., it MUST be true.....
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Old 11-23-2011, 04:36 PM   #28
 
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Yup, direct from their marketing department.....

If it's on the internet., it MUST be true.....

Last edited by AbbeysDad; 11-23-2011 at 04:38 PM..
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Old 11-23-2011, 05:23 PM   #29
 
why would it matter if it is fit for human consumption? They are fish not humans. A lot of the nutrition for carnivorous animals are in the parts that we generally scoff at eating. Liver being a good example. If the fish meal in my cheap fish food is primarily fish entrails and bones I'm not bothered by that in the least. Its still a perfectly fine protein source. IMO its more important that the fish have the option to eat their 'natural' diet requirements. What I mean by this is that omnivorous fish are not fed a high protein diet. Same way in that strict carnivores should have a high protein diet.

Someone mentioned dog food and this is on quiet a different level then fish food. Most fish are omnivorous, where as dogs are carnivores. I've had similar issues with cat food. Basically no dry food is good for a carnivore. My families 13 year old cat ate strictly science diet for 12 years. Then he became diabetic and the vet put him on insulin. Two weeks after starting insulin armed with a $10 blood glucose meter and a TON of web research I made the decision to stop the insulin. At that same time we switched him to canned fancy feast. In the end problem solved and he is no longer diabetic or dependent on insulin, BUT only as long as his diet remains low carb. Dry foods are quiet high in carbs due to the processing, things like corn meal do not belong in a carnivores diet. This only causes problems in the long run.

I lost a lot of trust in the pet(cat/dog) food industry because the food normally does the opposite of what it claims. Even the prescription dry "diabetic management" cat food the vet gave us listed its first main ingredient as corn! Who thought managing diabetes by feeding carbs was ever going to be successful? He wouldn't be able to eat that without having insulin injections. 'Light' or weightloss foods also have higher carbs which more often cause a carnivore to gain weight not loose it.

Fish being mostly omnivores they do much better on dry foods then any carnivore would. If you have a pretty strict carnivorous fish you should make sure you have a high protein food. Its hard to find high protein dry foods that are a 'reasonable' cost. It would be cheaper and better to just feed raw in this situation IMO. Thats why my fish eat mostly dry food, but my caecilian eats strictly raw food. The fish in that tank are lucky since they do clean up all the scraps of raw fish.

In my 55 gallon which has my breeding group of boesemani rainbows and my wild panda garras they get 2 types of dry foods, 'cichlid' pellets and algae wafers. While you are all debating about fish meal, I'm gonna say BOTH these foods I use have wheat listed as the first ingredient. Does this make them low quality? I don't think so. My fish are omnivores and they are adults, thus they don't need a lot of protein. They should have more forage/plant material. My rainbows munch on the stargrass in the tank too. They get blood worms once a week and as a group they spawn almost every day. The rainbowfish fry on the other-hand get food that is 60% protein because they need it for growth.
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Old 11-23-2011, 05:55 PM   #30
 
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Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post

Someone mentioned dog food and this is on quiet a different level then fish food. Most fish are omnivorous, where as dogs are carnivores. I've had similar issues with cat food. Basically no dry food is good for a carnivore. My families 13 year old cat ate strictly science diet for 12 years. Then he became diabetic and the vet put him on insulin. Two weeks after starting insulin armed with a $10 blood glucose meter and a TON of web research I made the decision to stop the insulin. At that same time we switched him to canned fancy feast. In the end problem solved and he is no longer diabetic or dependent on insulin, BUT only as long as his diet remains low carb. Dry foods are quiet high in carbs due to the processing, things like corn meal do not belong in a carnivores diet. This only causes problems in the long run.
That's why my dog gets fed grain free food. Not veggie free...but grain free.
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