Transferring fish...where did I go wrong? - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Transferring fish...where did I go wrong?

Transferring fish...where did I go wrong?

This is a discussion on Transferring fish...where did I go wrong? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I plugged in all of your fish into Aqadvisor, which is a site that compares fish needs and compatibility and how they potentially fit ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Flame Tetra
Flame Tetra
Adolfo's Cory
Adolfo's Cory
Like Tree30Likes

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Transferring fish...where did I go wrong?
Old 04-23-2013, 11:45 AM   #21
 
jentralala's Avatar
 
I plugged in all of your fish into Aqadvisor, which is a site that compares fish needs and compatibility and how they potentially fit together in an aquarium. This is based on decades of extensive research into fish care, by ichthyologists who have spent their lives researching their specific habitats, diets, and the water they live in. This is not just opinion or heresy, it is fact.

This is what Aqadvisor had to say about your stocking.

Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 4 inches.
Warning: At least 5 x Melanochromis Auratus are recommended in a group.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is not recommended to be with Oscar - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is not recommended to be with Albino Cory - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is not recommended to be with Rainbow Shark - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is not recommended to be with Frontosa - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Note: Oscar may jump - lids are recommended.
Warning: Oscar is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 14 inches.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus may become food for Oscar.
Warning: Albino Cory may become food for Oscar.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos may become food for Oscar.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus is too aggressive to co-exist with Albino Cory.
Warning: Oscar is too aggressive to co-exist with Albino Cory.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is too aggressive to co-exist with Albino Cory.
Note: Rainbow Shark may jump - lids are recommended.
Warning: Rainbow Shark is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 6 inches.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 4.5 inches.
Warning: At least 5 x Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos are recommended in a group.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is not recommended to be with Oscar - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is not recommended to be with Albino Cory - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is not recommended to be with Rainbow Shark - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos is not recommended to be with Frontosa - mbuna species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended for your tank - it may eventually outgrow your tank space, potentially reaching up to 12 inches.
Warning: At least 5 x Frontosa are recommended in a group.
Warning: Melanochromis Auratus may become food for Frontosa.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended to be with Melanochromis Auratus - lake Tanganyika species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended to be with Oscar - lake Tanganyika species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Albino Cory may become food for Frontosa.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended to be with Albino Cory - lake Tanganyika species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended to be with Rainbow Shark - lake Tanganyika species should not be mixed with other groups.
Warning: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos may become food for Frontosa.
Warning: Frontosa is not recommended to be with Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos - lake Tanganyika species should not be mixed with other groups.
Note: You have selected mbuna species. These species in general, need to be overstocked to control aggression (over 100% stocking level). Make sure your filtration is sufficient and keep up with water changes. (Read more about beginner mbuna species here).
Warning: At least 4 x Albino Cory are recommended in a group.

Warning: Your selected species may eventually require 158% of your aquarium space. You may need to deal with territorial aggressions later on. Try removing some of (Astronotus ocellatus, Corydoras aeneus) or get a larger tank.


Recommended temperature range: 24 - 26 C. [Display in Farenheit]
Warning: Water pH requirements are not fully compatible between all selected species.
=> 7.6 - 9: Melanochromis Auratus
=> 6.4 - 7.5: Oscar
=> 5.5 - 7.8: Albino Cory
=> 6 - 8: Rainbow Shark
=> 7.6 - 9: Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos
=> 7.6 - 9: Frontosa
Recommended hardness range: 10 - 15 dH.






Recommended water change schedule: 81% per week. (You might want to split this water change schedule to two separate 56% per week)
Your aquarium stocking level is 194%.
Your tank is overstocked. Unless you are an experienced aquarist who can meet the maintenance/biological needs of this aquarium, lower stocking levels are recommended
Chesh likes this.
jentralala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 12:06 PM   #22
JDM
 
JDM's Avatar
 
Well, I think that is the longest Aqadvisor posted here yet. I didn't know Oscars would jump.

Jeff.
JDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 12:12 PM   #23
 
jentralala's Avatar
 
I kind of thought I broke it when it spat that back at me.
jentralala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2013, 12:53 PM   #24
 
Chesh's Avatar
 
NJDfan - HELLO! Looks like you're fairly new to posting here, so welcome to TFK!

I'm glad that you found us, it always makes me happy to see fish-keepers taking the time out to learn about the animals that they keep. Regardless of how long any of us have kept tanks, there is always so much more to learn about this amazing underwater world. . .

I just stumbled onto this thread for the first time, and I must say, there is a LOT of information here to process! Looking over all of the information given by the others, I have to say that I'm in agreement. You have some very important decisions to make - and soon - if your goal is to keep a happy and thriving community.

I'd like to encourage you strongly to take some time out now to really look into the requirements and needs of the fish that are currently living with you. The others are correct in warning you that you are on a path that will ultimately lead to disaster, and the loss of many innocent little lives. Obviously, we fishy fanatics here will always do our best to give advice that has the best interests of the animals at heart. . .

You're in a great position right now to make the necessary changes to your set up and stocking to ensure that those fish who continue on in your care are given the best you can offer them, and will go on to lead long and healthy lives.

You seem to like Cichlids! I do, too. . . we have an area here devoted to them. It may help you to post a thread in our Cichlid subforum where people who are especially knowledgeable about them may be able to offer you more assistance. As mentioned previously, our fish profiles also contain a great deal of information, and are a wonderful place to start your research on the inhabitants of your tank.

I hope to see you take much of the advice you've received on this thread to heart, and stick around to become an active member of our happy fishy community! It would make me very happy to be given the opportunity to watch this tank grow and change as you learn more about how to care for and maintain the aquatic animals under your care!

Again, welcome! Always nice to 'see' a new face!
Chesh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 09:20 PM   #25
 
I want to thank everyone again for continuing to offer comments and advice, it is definitely much appreciated and I am certainly taking it all in and will hopefully learn from it.

With that said, I am a little taken aback by some of your comments, jentralala. I understand some of the issues that I may be facing soon, like my fish eventually outgrowing the tank, but I have to disagree about the whole thriving and happiness part. While I may not interpret that my fish are necessarily happy just because they are not dead, that in and of itself may actually be a good indicator, at least with aggressive fish like I have now, since as I mentioned the Auratus did kill the Ram in a matter of days, and before he died you could see him very isolated and scared, just sitting on the rocks and really not moving that much. But with all of that aside, I do pay close attention to my fish and enjoy watching them at various times throughout the day, and I think I have a decent idea of whether or not they are "happy" and/or "thriving". I may not be a fish mind-reader, but neither are you. It is not my goal to torment fish and keep them in conditions that would be harmful to them, and again I realize there may be potential for that to happen in the future, but as of right now I do feel they are all getting along great. This may be against odds, but for now it seems to be true.

I understand fish tend to be territorial, and I tried to aid in this aspect by adding lots of plants and décor for hiding spots and areas for the fish to make their own. I have seen this come to light in many ways. The Oscar for example tends to own the top part of the tank. My 36g bowfront is quite tall, and he hangs out along the top swimming back and forth. Conversely, the Johanni rarely leaves the bottom and enjoys swimming back and forth quickly along the substrate. The Auratus, naturally, is in between them, and is a mid-range swimmer. Next, the Frontosa doesn't seem to be secluded to any one area, but is generally a mid-range floater as well. The Cory has been doing exactly what I suspected -- sucking on the plants and/or décor, and even the rocks and glass. He keeps to himself, and although I understand he should be with and prefers to be with a handful or more of his kind, he seems happy, and none of the other fish bother him at all. Lastly, the shark, although potentially mildly aggressive, also seems to keep to himself. I will said that he is VERY small, maybe the length of my pinky finger at best, but also about HALF the width of my pinky. I have had red-tailed sharks before, even with cichlids, and there was never a problem. In fact, the only time the shark was aggressive, was to his own kind! I had another red-tailed shark with him, and the bigger one would frequently chase the slightly smaller one. Not sure if it was a male/female thing, or just a non-friendly thing, but the cichlids and sharks never had any issue with each other.


Anyway, I will stop ranting now, but I just wanted to express my observations thus far, and that I do believe I have a happy tank (for now). I think the best way to learn is by personal experience which is what I am going through now. I hope that these fish continue to co-exist peacefully the way they are now, but if there is a problem at any point I will act on it and hopefully do so before it becomes catastrophic. My goal is of course to see my fish live long and healthy lives, not only because I have invested time and money into this, but because, I do actually have a heart :)
NJDfan1711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 10:03 PM   #26
 
Tazman's Avatar
 
Auratus if it is a male has the ability to take on a full grown oscar, these fish can be really nice one minute and the next, floating around by themselves as they killed everything else off.

Aggression nearly all the time is actually missed by us, we see the end result but rarely the physical act.

The main concern here is the tank size and fishes ability to display its natural traits, something it wont be able to do in a small tank. The water parameters in which African cichlids live is totally different than South American, while the fish may look and behave healthy, actually it is not.

Oscars for one like water temperatures between 70-75F, African ciclids thrive and breed in around 75-80F. The water hardness for Oscars is soft-medium, while for African cichlids it is hard.

The other concern here is the sheer bioload this tank is going to have to deal with once these fish mature, frontosa are slow growers, Africans relatively but Oscars, no, they grow very fast. The waste they produce is also high as it is for the Africans as well. You might need to be doing increased water changes and also testing the water regularly with a liquid test kit such as API master.

No one is here to judge you, we are here to offer advice, we neither can nor have the ability to dictate what you decide to you. The information we provide is a recommendation only.
Byron, djembekah, Chesh and 1 others like this.
Tazman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2013, 11:44 PM   #27
 
AndrewM21's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJDfan1711 View Post
I may not be a fish mind-reader, but neither are you. It is not my goal to torment fish and keep them in conditions that would be harmful to them, and again I realize there may be potential for that to happen in the future, but as of right now I do feel they are all getting along great. This may be against odds, but for now it seems to be true.
I have went ahead and commented out a large portion of your post as I only intend to reply directly to the above mentioned.

No one here is a mind-reader, that's apparent. But you should realize that you have received great advice from a lot of experienced fish keepers and the end result in all of the advice has came down to the same thing. Would this not be something you are willing to consider before proceeding with your current plan?

I completely understand that you think everything is running as intended and you want to hold on to the hope that it will continue to stay that way, but I can assure you that it will not. You do not need to read the mind of a fish to know what is going on. The fish may seem happy, but could very well be dieing and you not even notice this until it is floating at the top of your aquarium. You asked for advice and it was given to you, please take a moment and consider the advice that was given and if you still wish to proceed as you plan to do, then feel free. We are only here to make sure that you get the best possible advice and hope that you follow the advice for the best interest of the fish you have in the aquarium, I do not believe any member here (or well, some might) but a majority will not intentionally give you advice that will harm your fish, so it is worth it to actually consider the advice that is given to you.

You have fish that are simply NOT compatible, period. As Tazman pointed out, you have fish that require very very different water parameters and no matter how hard you attempt to satisfy both, one will be left to deal with parameters that are not suited to them by nature. The worst case scenario would be that your attempts to satisfy both needs would result in increased stress on both sides and result in a disaster. You should always stock based on the current parameters in the aquarium and not alter them to fit the needs of new fish if you already have fish in the aquarium that are established.

I do wish you the best of luck with the hobby and our intent is not to discourage you but to ensure that you get the best and most accurate advice that we can offer, for the best interest of both your wallet and your fish.

Good luck!
Byron, djembekah and ERICVANCOUVER like this.
AndrewM21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2013, 04:16 AM   #28
 
MoneyMitch's Avatar
 
aside from the other issues, plants some fast growers will help keep the water params a bit more stable with that bio load. might be something to look into? =)
Chesh and ERICVANCOUVER like this.
MoneyMitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2013, 11:09 AM   #29
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I must add my agreement to the advice others have given which is very sound indeed. I will not go into all the scientific data that proves what has been said, but the article I authored on stress might help you understand what we are all advocating. Please read it. We are all concerned very much about fish, including your fish, and things are not OK in that tank.

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...um-fish-98852/

Byron.
Chesh and ERICVANCOUVER like this.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Byron For This Useful Post:
Chesh (04-26-2013), jentralala (04-26-2013), Persephone (04-27-2013)
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Transferring fish to new tank - what kind of cycling is needed? steagle Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 17 05-11-2012 02:52 PM
Transferring fish, not snails Flashygrrl Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 2 02-07-2008 08:12 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:09 AM.