Totally lost 'doing reseach'
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Totally lost 'doing reseach'

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Totally lost 'doing reseach'
Old 03-11-2012, 05:27 PM   #1
 
Totally lost 'doing reseach'

I bought a 2nd hand 4ft fish tank approx 200 Litre on EBAY come with a cabinet and hood, the glass panels did not appear to be fitting and the whole tank appeared out of whack, as per the glass lids, a slight crack in it, road tested the tank and found the crack was all the way through,as per the leak in the corner, so I patched it up, again doing research, and also advice from my LFS then tested again, within 12 hours the crack went from the bottom corner right up to the top... I threw it out and bought a whole new tank, but it appears the cabinet may be out of whack, does anyone know how to get this level?, also I have read that I should be getting a 55 G tank (us younger skips talk in metric not imperial) the 4' fish tank is all I could afford, have bought an UGF and set it up, but I have been told to get a CF, Im so confussed as to what to do I am at wits end almost, I wanna do this slowly but surely, the water is running its paces through the undergravel filter but there is nothing else in the tank, Im looking at a tropical aquarium, preferably planted.... any ideas?
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:05 PM   #2
 
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First off, welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

Second, I moved your post to start a new thread. It had been posted in an old thread where few would see it. Now it should get more "action."

Third, to your questions. On leveling the stand, can you describe just what is out? If it is wood and warped, or just uneven, or... ?? Some of our members are very clever with fixing this.

To the tank. If you intend plants, I would not recommend an undergravel filter. In fact, I wouldn't recommend this in any case. There are better filters these days. A good canister rated to the tank size will do the job, especially with plants. There are many types and makes, most will "filter" OK, some do it superbly. Then there is the reliability and durability aspect. I'm sure many members will have comments here.

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Da11as (03-12-2012)
Old 03-12-2012, 04:25 PM   #3
 
Re: levellingh the stand

Thank you for the welcome, and also moving my post, Im the most computer illiterate bimbo there is in todays world... the tank appears to leaning to the front by about a good 5cm and it appears the cabinet is also, it made of wood and Im not sure wether it is warped or just out, or wether the floor is out, I was thinking of plants, and also a community tank with tetras in it, I were told to use an internal with an undergravel filter, thus I bought the undergravel filter, I was looking at the Eheim Pro 3 canister filter, but have read even though it is the best brand there are others out there almost just as good withoout the $$$ tag
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Old 03-12-2012, 05:13 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by Da11as View Post
Thank you for the welcome, and also moving my post, Im the most computer illiterate bimbo there is in todays world... the tank appears to leaning to the front by about a good 5cm and it appears the cabinet is also, it made of wood and Im not sure wether it is warped or just out, or wether the floor is out, I was thinking of plants, and also a community tank with tetras in it, I were told to use an internal with an undergravel filter, thus I bought the undergravel filter, I was looking at the Eheim Pro 3 canister filter, but have read even though it is the best brand there are others out there almost just as good withoout the $$$ tag
On the stand, it is very important to have it level. A tank that is tilted very little can, with all the weight of the water, substrate, etc on the frame, develop weak points and leak. And the glass may even crack from the stress. As long as the tank sits on a very even base (the top of the stand itself), the stand can be wedged up where it meets the floor provided this is not too great (so as to tip it if it is bumped or something). If the stand top is perhaps a bit uneven, the easy fix is a sheet of plywood or particle board, about half an inch thick, that is about 1/2 inch longer/wider than the tank frame. The tank will sit on the board and the weight will evenly distribute and the tank will be on a flat surface as the board will "give" sufficient to compensate.

On the filter, Eheim has the track record to be worth the cost. Other filters can filter just as well; will they perform as long and as reliably? We don't know because none of them have been around as long as Eheim. I have two Eheim Pro II which I bought back in 1996 and 1997, one has the heating element (avoiding heaters in the tank), and these have been operating without any issues since then. I also have a Rena XP3 that I bought just over two years ago; I have no issue with its filtering capability. But will it last as long? Will I end up spending what I "saved" in a couple years to repair or replace it? Don't know. BTW, the only reason I bought it was that no one locally was carrying Eheim at the time, and I prefer buying equipment locally for several reasons.

So, the Eheim Pro 3 (the newer version of my Pro 2) is certainly worth it. But I still recommend the Rena as a good filter too. And for both, I use Fluval media because it is considerably less expensive than either Rena or Eheim; talking here of the ceramic disks, bio rock stuff. The pads I buy Eheim or Rena so they fit. I chose the Rena over Fluval for tghe filter because all the reviews I could find rated them accordingly, with Eheim first, Rena second, Fluval third.

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Old 03-12-2012, 06:45 PM   #5
 
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Hi Da11as. Welcome to TFK!! I agree with Byron on the Eheim. I have both an Eheim 2215, real old reliable workhorse, and a Fluval something. The Eheim is 15 years old and that makes the Fluval even older. Both still work altho neither has a built in prime to start the flow after changing pads/cleaning. They do both have shut off valves in the hoses so that I can leave the hoses hanging on the tank and take the unit to the tub for emptying.
I don't change my media either. Only rinse or replace the sponge like pads. just make sure they are the right fit so that the water if forced to go thru them and not around.
Also, JIC...make sure anything you do with your filter is done in either old tank water, or new De-chlorinated water so that you do not kill your good bacteria in the filter media causing a new cycle.
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:38 AM   #6
 
Question now not so 'totally lost'

got an an absolute bargain on an 'Eheim 3e' woohoo! ask the right questions get the right answers :) have finally decided on the following...
a:) 2 x angelfish
b:) 2 x Pearl Gourami or Dwarf Gourami ( I like the colour)
c:) 10 x Blue Congo Tetras ???
d:) 8 x Julii Corydoras... but I NEED your opinion, yes the tapwater has chloramines/chlorine and every other ...ide/ine known to man. will test for PH and all other balances and what not, just a few things now, would you suggest a "Master' test kit or a 'Professional' test kit? and what is the diff?, next stop gravel, but is it would it be worth while connecting the canister to the UG pipes at all or at least one as either an output or an input?
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:37 AM   #7
 
Welcome mate.

No, you don't wanna hook a canister to a UGF - The UGF has just gotta go - they can work, but are more trouble than they're worth. If you don't routinely and aggressively vacuum the gravel, it tends to become a nitrate factory and fouls the water. A good canister or HOB filter is all you need.
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Old 03-16-2012, 12:38 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Da11as View Post
got an an absolute bargain on an 'Eheim 3e' woohoo! ask the right questions get the right answers :) have finally decided on the following...
a:) 2 x angelfish
b:) 2 x Pearl Gourami or Dwarf Gourami ( I like the colour)
c:) 10 x Blue Congo Tetras ???
d:) 8 x Julii Corydoras... but I NEED your opinion, yes the tapwater has chloramines/chlorine and every other ...ide/ine known to man. will test for PH and all other balances and what not, just a few things now, would you suggest a "Master' test kit or a 'Professional' test kit? and what is the diff?, next stop gravel, but is it would it be worth while connecting the canister to the UG pipes at all or at least one as either an output or an input?
I agree with AD, get rid of the UG filter. The canister alone will be sufficient.

The API Master test kit is adequate. You want to test for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate during the first few months (and pH too of course), then after that pH and nitrates periodically.

As for tap water, a good water conditioner will handle this. Test your water for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate when you get the kit. It is worth knowing if any of these are present. This will tell you what type of conditioner. Some handle just chlorine/chloramine, some also ammonia, and a few also nitrite and nitrate.

Do you know the GH (general hardness) and KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity) of the tap water? These you can ascertain from the water supply people, they may have a website with water data posted. Extremes in GH may need consideration, depending upon the fish.

To the fish. I would not mix angelfish and Gourami, males of both are territorial. And angelfish should be in a group, 5 would be nice in your 4-foot tank. Read more in our profiles, second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top.

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Old 03-16-2012, 06:19 PM   #9
 
Okay here goes... hopefully someone may assist me in analysing what this means....

PH: 7.6 - 8.3 - yet to do a High PH test but tested about right with a PH test kit
Total Hardness: 59 - 71
In case there is any technical info that is required from me about local water quality ---> http://www.sydneywater.com.au/WaterQ...011.pdf#Page=1
I have a Master test kit the only problem is I have only 1 test tube, so I wanna buy a whole new test kit, dunno if I'm able to use 1 test tube for all the tests, I am holding on to the UGF but wont be using it, also to do a fishless cycle, if I am to use a prawn, when I get up to that stage sooner rather than later, when do I take it out? and when and how often do I do a water change during a cycling?
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:10 AM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Da11as View Post
Okay here goes... hopefully someone may assist me in analysing what this means....

PH: 7.6 - 8.3 - yet to do a High PH test but tested about right with a PH test kit
Total Hardness: 59 - 71
In case there is any technical info that is required from me about local water quality ---> http://www.sydneywater.com.au/WaterQ...011.pdf#Page=1
I have a Master test kit the only problem is I have only 1 test tube, so I wanna buy a whole new test kit, dunno if I'm able to use 1 test tube for all the tests, I am holding on to the UGF but wont be using it, also to do a fishless cycle, if I am to use a prawn, when I get up to that stage sooner rather than later, when do I take it out? and when and how often do I do a water change during a cycling?
Water looks good. Hardness is very soft, 59-71 mg/l is roughly same as ppm, which equates to 3-4 dGH. The KH (Alkalinity) is slightly less, so this means the pH will be lightly buffered and thus in an established aquarium lower as the water acidifies.

What this means is that you will be good for soft water fish; those you mentioned are in this category, as are almost all the characins, many of the Cyprinids, catfish, South American cichlids. [Livebearers will not fare well so I suggest avoiding them, and same for rift lake cichlids.]

You can use the same test tube for all tests, just rinse it thoroughly under the tap after each test. If this is the API kit, the tube will have a 5ml mark, and all their tests use 5ml of aquarium water.

Cycling. My advice is to have live plants. With the water you have and the fish suited to it, plants are almost mandatory. While artificial plants will serve the purpose of providing cover for the fish, the benefit of live plants is so great it is well worth it. And they are not difficult. The benefit in cycling is that with sufficient fast-growing plants (floating plants are ideal here) you can start off with a few fish and the plants and never worry about "cycling." I strongly recommend this method; I have used it for years.

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