Too much light?! - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 09:28 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
russp's Avatar
 
Too much light?!

I've been having an on going algae problem in my 10 gallon despite it having quite a few plants in it (3 java fern and two bunches of rotala indica). Since setting up my 29 gallon and realizing it only has one 17 watt flourescant tube, I'm suspecting the small tank having two 10 watt CFLs may be the problem. If I go to just one, half the tank is not lit so those plants wouldn't get much light and the tank looks odd. Any other thoughts? Are the standard 10 watt incandescants any good for the plants? I know they have much less light output than the CFLs.
russp is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 01:23 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
The intensity should not be too much, but the duration may be, and you haven't mentioned that. Java Fern is slow growing so it does not need much light, but if your Rotala indica is doing well I would not reduce the intensity.

I would stay with two CFL 10w daylight 6500K bulbs, I have this over my 10g. If you have a different spectrum, that might be part of the problem. The Daylight 6500K CFL's work very well over planted tanks.

Floating plants often help with algae control, and they also benefit other ways. In a 10g something like Brazilian Pennywort I find works very well, you can keep it controlled better than larger-growing plants like Water Sprite; just one of these would easily spread over the entire surface in no time.

On duration, not knowing what it is now, I would say no more than 8 hours daily. I can expand on this when I know the present duration. Also, what type of algae?

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
russp's Avatar
 
I have both this tank and my cichlid tank on the same timer set for 10 hours and the bulbs are marked as full spectrum. An email to the company got the reply that they were 5000K. The algae I'm getting is a very dark (almost black) algae on the fern leaves and a bright green, stringy algae in the corners of the glass. The ferns are constantly shooting off new leaves and roots and the rotala is developing a lot of new growth at the base of the plants while the tops are looking a little brown.
russp is offline  
post #4 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 01:44 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by russp View Post
I have both this tank and my cichlid tank on the same timer set for 10 hours and the bulbs are marked as full spectrum. An email to the company got the reply that they were 5000K. The algae I'm getting is a very dark (almost black) algae on the fern leaves and a bright green, stringy algae in the corners of the glass. The ferns are constantly shooting off new leaves and roots and the rotala is developing a lot of new growth at the base of the plants while the tops are looking a little brown.
The black algae on the fern leaves is likely brush algae. This often appears on Java Fern and Anubias if the light is too intense. The very slow-growing leaves attract this algae in light. Some shading with floating plants would help. And I would reduce the duration. Perhaps a second timer for this tank if the other is doing well with the 10 hours.

The "warmer" spectrum of your CFL's should be fine for the Rotala, so I wouldn't mess with that. It is possible the reduction may affect this plant, but you can always change it back. By the way, is any liquid fertilizer being used? This would help the plants use the light more and algae would be less able to increase.

The light reduction (duration) should solve the stringy algae (perhaps hair, or staghorn...) also. It may take some fiddling, you have a higher light and a much lower light requirement plants together, and in a small space it is not always easy to accommodate both.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 02:25 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
russp's Avatar
 
The cichlid tank has some amazon swords, wisteria and a couple java ferns and absolutely no algae. All the plants are doing well so I may try cutting back the timer to both tanks and see what happens. I haven't been running any fertilizer. The one time I did a few years back, the algae went crazy so I've stayed away from it ever since. Would the wisteria from the cichlid tank grow as a floater in the smaller tropical tank?

I see your from Vancouver, my favorite place on earth. I've been there a number of times and took the wife there for our honeymoon; she fell in love with it also. There is even a 40" wide panoramic phote of the Vancuver shoreline at night over my cichlid tank.
russp is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 01-23-2012, 07:18 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by russp View Post
The cichlid tank has some amazon swords, wisteria and a couple java ferns and absolutely no algae. All the plants are doing well so I may try cutting back the timer to both tanks and see what happens. I haven't been running any fertilizer. The one time I did a few years back, the algae went crazy so I've stayed away from it ever since. Would the wisteria from the cichlid tank grow as a floater in the smaller tropical tank?

I see your from Vancouver, my favorite place on earth. I've been there a number of times and took the wife there for our honeymoon; she fell in love with it also. There is even a 40" wide panoramic phote of the Vancuver shoreline at night over my cichlid tank.
I moved here 26 years ago, deliberately. It is a beautiful city. I remember then-President Clinton when he was here for the summit with President Yeltsin in 1993 or thereabouts, saying that he could never have imagined such a beautiful city, and he would be back. And he has been.

Wisteria will grow floating. I have no luck with this plant, my light is not sufficient. Wisteria should be good at keeping algae at bay because it grows fast and thus assimilates nutrients and uses the light.

If the plants are doing well, don't worry about fertilizer. Some tanks need these, some don't. Nutrients come from the fish food (directly or from organics) and tap water. If the plants are getting what they need naturally, fine.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 01-24-2012, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
russp's Avatar
 
Let's see what happens. I dropped the lighting time down and added a few stems of wisteria from the cichlid tank to the 10 gallon tropical. As fast as it grows in the cichlid tank, it should form a canopy in the 10 gallon pretty quick and I can add more if needed. Thanks.
russp is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marineland LED light system and low light plants mcb5522 Beginner Planted Aquarium 7 03-07-2011 03:40 PM
Hark, a light, a light at the end of the tunnel! jcinnb Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 2 01-18-2011 09:25 PM
Fish tank light blew.. How long can a tank go without a light?? thefishboy Freshwater and Tropical Fish 11 12-13-2010 12:06 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome