Tank Size vs Depth - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 10:23 AM Thread Starter
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Tank Size vs Depth

Hello Everyone!

So i am wanting/needing to upgrade one of my 10 gallons to something larger.

I am really intrigued by the 40 gallon Breeder tanks.

One of the things i really hate about my 55 gallon is how skinny it is. When your trying to put wood and rocks and live plants etc etc etc in there its just too narrow for my liking.

so i have really been looking into setting up a 40 g breeder tank.

i know the reason tanks are made for height vs depth, its for viewing purposes

are there any other CONS to getting a tank of this size?

upgrading my 55g to a 75 for the added depth is also on the list of "to do" my plants are consuming it lol.
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post #2 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 10:29 AM
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40 gal breeder is much easier to work in than taller tank (ie) planting,maint.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
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post #3 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 11:35 AM
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Long, and not deep I think is ideal, but like you say a 55 is just too narrow.

A lot of fish really do enjoy longer swimming room so they can dash all the way across the tank without having to stop. I think the standard 125g is great for this, it's what I have. It's a 6 foot tank ... but unfortunatly it is also tall which makes dealing with plants rather hard (you only get a top down view, which means no depth perception at all).

As an example, a 20g long tank is far better for most fish than a 20g tall even though they are the same volume. I have a 20g tall and really regret it to be honest, wish I had gone for the long!

If I was ever to get a custom tank built, I would probably make it 10-12 feet long, but only 18" or so tall. I like small to medium sized fish, don't much care for most of the giants.
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post #4 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
A lot of fish really do enjoy longer swimming room so they can dash all the way across the tank without having to stop. I think the standard 125g is great for this, it's what I have. It's a 6 foot tank ... but unfortunatly it is also tall which makes dealing with plants rather hard (you only get a top down view, which means no depth perception at all).
I hear ya. The 220 is 30" deep and it is hard to work with.

Quote:
As an example, a 20g long tank is far better for most fish than a 20g tall even though they are the same volume. I have a 20g tall and really regret it to be honest, wish I had gone for the long!
Me too.

Quote:
If I was ever to get a custom tank built, I would probably make it 10-12 feet long, but only 18" or so tall. I like small to medium sized fish, don't much care for most of the giants.
That would be awesome.

I think it boils down to are you more interested in plants or fish? The wider tank is going to give you more room to aquascape, but 36" length vs 48" length is going to limit the fish you can put it in, less variety, smaller schools, smaller fish. So it really depends what you want to do with the tank. Personally, I like the dimensions of a standard 48", 55 gallon tank, but I can understand how it would be narrow if your priority was plants.



Last edited by Canadian Fish; 12-17-2012 at 03:17 PM.
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post #5 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
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I think it boils down to are you more interested in plants or fish? The wider tank is going to give you more room to aquascape, but 36" length vs 48" length is going to limit the fish you can put it in, less variety, smaller schools, smaller fish. So it really depends what you want to do with the tank. Personally, I like the dimensions of a standard 48", 55 gallon tank, but I can understand how it would be narrow if your priority was plants.
Its not necessarily that plants are my priority, but i just feel like my 55 is too narrow, and finding things that i like, that make the fish comfortable, like wood/plants is too difficult, my 55 is cramped, i have less than 20 fish in it and i feel like its too small :P

the 40 breeder is going to feature some Kribs i think.

maybe the title should of been length vs depth vs height.

i am fairly certain a normal 40 gallon and 40 breeder are the same length, just a height vs depth difference.
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 04:20 PM
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Its not necessarily that plants are my priority, but i just feel like my 55 is too narrow, and finding things that i like, that make the fish comfortable, like wood/plants is too difficult, my 55 is cramped, i have less than 20 fish in it and i feel like its too small :P

the 40 breeder is going to feature some Kribs i think.

maybe the title should of been length vs depth vs height.

i am fairly certain a normal 40 gallon and 40 breeder are the same length, just a height vs depth difference.
Usually it is

40 gallon Breeder 36" x 18" x 16"

40 gallon Long 48" x 12" x 16"

It's all a matter of opinion, as I said. I think the fish I keep have plenty of turning room in the 48" 55 gallon (including some big silver dollars), and make full use of the extra foot of tank length. Less swim length, as far as I am concerned, means smaller fish, and smaller schools.

(It all depends on the fish, I keep Silver Dollars in one 55, and Rainbowfish in the other, and neither of those should be kept in a 36" tank)



Last edited by Canadian Fish; 12-17-2012 at 04:31 PM.
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post #7 of 7 Old 12-17-2012, 05:36 PM
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The kribensis cichlid is mentioned. So considering this fish is not an active swimmer, the 40g will be fine. However, second consideration is territory, and "kribs" is plural so if more than a pair is intended, consider the surface space (area of the substrate). The longer a tank, the more individual territories it can accomodate, up to a point.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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