Is Sulfer water safe?
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Is Sulfer water safe?

This is a discussion on Is Sulfer water safe? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I am going to be moveing into a house that we bought but the water has sulfer in it. Is it going to be ...

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Is Sulfer water safe?
Old 09-13-2010, 08:12 AM   #1
 
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Is Sulfer water safe?

I am going to be moveing into a house that we bought but the water has sulfer in it. Is it going to be safe for my plants and fish? Or should I carry water from my moms house? Or is there something I can add or do to the water to make it safe if its not.
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:12 PM   #2
 
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That rather depends upon the amount of sulphur. If this water is from the district (as opposed to a private well) I would expect the water board knows the amount of sulphur and it is safe. Of course, safe for humans doesn't mean safe for fish. But it means the amount is likely to be minimal.

Sulphur is a macro-nutrient for live plants, and it is contained in many fertilizers for aquarium plants. Hiscock says sulphur in its raw form is toxic and should never be introduced into the aquarium. From my reading of Walstad I gather sulphur is not classed as a "metal" as in heavy metals. I have never had reason to ask Seachem or other manufacturers about sulphur detoxification by Prime and such water conditioners that normally handle "heavy metals," and plants have the ability of take up heavy metals. "Take up" means detoxify, not assimilate as a nutrient.

I would suggest you contact the water board (again assuming this is municipal water) and find out the numbers and get their comments. We can go from there.

Byron.
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:06 AM   #3
 
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It is well water not municipal water. Now what?
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Old 09-14-2010, 10:13 AM   #4
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calmwaters View Post
It is well water not municipal water. Now what?
I would have a sample tested by a lab. Before I drank any of it myself, as well as before using it for fish. Could be other substances in it too. Iron, zinc, copper are often present in well water. In her book Diana Walstad mentions her own well water being high in metals (zinc I think) and having to be treated before use in fish tanks. Iron is common. Also, you'll want to know the hardness.
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Old 09-14-2010, 10:52 AM   #5
 
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Ok I will have to see if I can find a lab around here that can test it. The landlord had a problem with a trouble maker here in the park that said the water was causeing her to have kidney stones and the state did come out and check the water and they said it was fine for people but I don't know about fish. What kind of lab would do water test?
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Old 09-14-2010, 11:16 AM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calmwaters View Post
Ok I will have to see if I can find a lab around here that can test it. The landlord had a problem with a trouble maker here in the park that said the water was causeing her to have kidney stones and the state did come out and check the water and they said it was fine for people but I don't know about fish. What kind of lab would do water test?
I don't know, never having to do this. If you can track down the office that did the previous testing, that may tell you something; you basically want to know what is in the water, and how much. If others are drinking the water with no issues, and subject to the verification that the previous tests turned up no issues, any substance is likely to be minimal. Metals would be handled by the water conditioner. It's the sulphur I know nothing about.
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Old 09-14-2010, 11:48 AM   #7
 
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Ok I will talk to the landlord tonight maybe he can give me there number or maybe even better he may have a print out or something of the test results.
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Old 09-14-2010, 04:06 PM   #8
 
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Ok I will talk to the landlord tonight maybe he can give me there number or maybe even better he may have a print out or something of the test results.
Yes, and while we're waiting for that, I have contacted Seachem to ask if Prime handles sulphur; that may help us too.
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Old 09-15-2010, 08:38 AM   #9
 
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Thank you Byron as always you are so helpful. I called last night and left a message for the landlord hopefully I will here something back today from him.
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:47 PM   #10
 
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Below is the response from Seachem:
Hello Byron,
Thanks for the question. The presence of hydrogen sulfide
(not elemental sulfur) in groundwater is common. Prime
will not reduce this in the water. There are a few options
for treatment of hydrogen sulfide. One option is to use a
filtration system to remove it. We make a Reverse Osmosis
unit along with a Carbon KDF filter which will remove
Hydrogen Sulfide from the water. Here is a link to these
products for further review:

http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/Pinnacle.html
http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/ROCartridges.html

Chlorination of the water using bleach is also an option
for removing hydrogen sulfide. The bleach will oxidize the
hydrogen sulfide and produce solid elemental sulfur.
However, the particulate should then be removed by passing
the water through an activated carbon filter.
An additional option would be to run the water through
Granular Ferric Oxide (GFO) media which is marketed as a
phosphate remover in the aquarium industry. These will
also convert the hydrogen sulfide to solid elemental
sulfur.

I hope this information was helpful and please let us know
if we can assist further.
I would suggest the first thing is to ascertain the results of that earlier test. I don't know how much sulphur fish can tolerate, compared to how much is safe for humans, or if there is even a difference.
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