Suggestions for 300 gallon tank?
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Suggestions for 300 gallon tank?

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Suggestions for 300 gallon tank?
Old 04-07-2010, 11:05 PM   #1
 
Suggestions for 300 gallon tank?

Hey guys, as a few of you might remember, I've got my three still young and small goldies, and I'm trying to get a bigger tank for them in the 55-90 gallon range as my budget allows, but it seems that one of my friends knows someone getting rid of a 300 gallon tank.

I have a few questions about all this, since obviously going from my 10 gallon tank to a massive 300 gallon tank is a really big move.

I don't know if it has a filtering system, and if it doesn't I'm assuming even several large HOB filters just won't do the job, so if anyone has suggestions on the route I should go(I don't plan on drilling the tank, and assume it isn't drilled) so it seems like a canister filter would maybe be the right choice?

I'm also curious on if the cycling process would be extremely long for it?
I plan on doing a fishless cycle, I'll see if I can find pure ammonia, since it seems like it would be cheaper than the large amount of shrimp I would need to throw into it.

Obviously the 300 gallon seems like it should be enough for my 3 goldfish even at adulthood, since the highest number I've heard is 80 gallons per goldfish, but would there be enough room for a handful of weather loaches in the future, or maybe a few more goldfish(any clue how many would be too many)

Any other suggestions on good coldwater fish to keep with them?

I plan on using play sand for the substrate, since it seems like my cheapest option(getting a ton of gravel or aquarium sand would cost a fortune compared I'm sure) so does anyone have any thoughts on how much sand would be necessary to fill the tank well, I am guessing about 300 pounds or more, but not sure(just guesstimating by the size of the 50 pound bag I already have, but I know I'll probably need more than that after I've cleaned it and lost a good amount)

I'm going to put in some large rocks I've been hunting for, try to get some driftwood, and there were a few listings I saw on ebay for a pretty large amount of slate (upwards of 30 pounds or more) so I'm thinking that may be the way I go for decorations, but any other suggestions for cheap decor for the tank would be helpful as well!

Right now I don't know the size, or if it comes with a stand or hood, but I am figuring with a tank that large I can have it on the ground for the time being, since in the basement we have solid concrete level floors.


I know this is alot to ask all at once, but any thoughts on any of it would be greatly appreciated!
Unfortunately I haven't heard many details yet, but know she wouldn't tell me if it was cracked, so I'm assuming at worst case re-siliconing it should have it holding water, but it probably holds water as is.

Just found out as I'm writing this, that the owner of the tank currently has nurse sharks in it, and as they were his sons he is trying to sell the sharks(supposedly they're negotioating with the boston aquarium), and then he told the friend who contacted me that she could have the tank, I'm waiting to hear back on if anything is included, but it's looking like I might luck out and it will have the equipment as well(which would be amazing)

After all that I wrote. it seems like I might not need all the advice I asked for, but since I'm not sure if it will have anything included, or if it maybe has cheap filtration or something, I would still love any help!

Thanks alot
Anthony
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Old 04-07-2010, 11:10 PM   #2
 
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I would love to answer all of your questions, but I don't have the time.

I would say that in a 300 gallon tank (now that would be huge), you would easily be able to accomodate 12+ goldfish.

I have never seen a canister filter built for any tank over 150 gallons. I would say get 2-3 of a very large canister filter model.

There are not many coldwater fish that are suitable with goldfish -- I would say that you should just try to focus on different types of goldfish for a stunning aquaria.

Hope this helps
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Old 04-07-2010, 11:31 PM   #3
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fusion MK View Post
I would love to answer all of your questions, but I don't have the time.

I would say that in a 300 gallon tank (now that would be huge), you would easily be able to accomodate 12+ goldfish.

I have never seen a canister filter built for any tank over 150 gallons. I would say get 2-3 of a very large canister filter model.

There are not many coldwater fish that are suitable with goldfish -- I would say that you should just try to focus on different types of goldfish for a stunning aquaria.

Hope this helps
It looked like in a few places that weather/dojo loaches were suitable to live with goldfish, so I'm hoping to get a few of those, and I'm thinking maybe just two or three more goldfish(I would assume that it's not a problem if the tank is understocked if thats even possible?)

I've got two comets and a common now, so I've been advised to stay away from fancy goldfish, which is fine with me, but I'm not sure how much more there is for non-fancy goldfish, although I've been eying some large white common goldfish, but are there any other interesting goldies that would be able to co-exist?
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Old 04-08-2010, 03:31 AM   #4
 
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Shubunkins would be fine with comets/commons.

A couple of thoughts:
1) If you keep the tank on the floor, I'm not sure how well canister filters would work. The pump water back into the tank but the intake works via siphon so if the canister is sitting level with the tank it won't work very well.
2) If he was using it for saltwater fish, there might be a lot of equipment that comes with it that you might not be able to use. Luckily for you this stuff is probably worth a pretty penny so you can resell it to cover some of your losses. Things like protein skimmers, fancy marine lighting, etc.
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Old 04-08-2010, 07:27 AM   #5
 
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Shubunkins would be fine with comets/commons.

A couple of thoughts:
1) If you keep the tank on the floor, I'm not sure how well canister filters would work. The pump water back into the tank but the intake works via siphon so if the canister is sitting level with the tank it won't work very well.
2) If he was using it for saltwater fish, there might be a lot of equipment that comes with it that you might not be able to use. Luckily for you this stuff is probably worth a pretty penny so you can resell it to cover some of your losses. Things like protein skimmers, fancy marine lighting, etc.
The saltwater filtration and such couldn't be cleaned thoroughly and used for freshwater if it was included?

Also, I've apparently seen a bunch of shubunkins at te stores, I just assumed they were comets with more speckledness lo. I guess they'll be something to look into too.
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Old 04-08-2010, 08:19 AM   #6
 
I would just cycle the tank with the 3 goldfish you own, there is NO WAY 3 goldfish will overoad a 300 gallon unless you feed them a side of beef.

Skip your LFS for the gravel, check building supply/garden stores in your area. Also check them for the slate/rocks, you are throwing money away if you buy them on ebaY.

And, as I'm sure you know, do mot use any marine gravel or coral/shells that may come with the tank.
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Old 04-08-2010, 04:36 PM   #7
 
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I would just cycle the tank with the 3 goldfish you own, there is NO WAY 3 goldfish will overoad a 300 gallon unless you feed them a side of beef.

Skip your LFS for the gravel, check building supply/garden stores in your area. Also check them for the slate/rocks, you are throwing money away if you buy them on ebaY.

And, as I'm sure you know, do mot use any marine gravel or coral/shells that may come with the tank.
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As I figured, I'm planning on going with play sand for the substrate, and I'll poke around quarries and garden stores for slate and such(the large rocks I have I've just been picking up around the yard lol)

I figured the substrate in the tank and decor won't be much use for a freshwater setup, but if theres anything possibly usable, I'll be cleaning it very well(warm water many many times) and giving it the vinegar test, but I'm not counting on having much for decor involved in the deal.

Any clues on if the current saltwater filtration will probably be cleanable for use with freshwater, or if it would be a base by base situation dependant on the filter(s)?


(Also, I kind of want to go with a fishless cycle just so I know everythings working properly, since after over a month, my 10 gallon with the 3 goldfish still has zero nitrites, so I feel like I might be safer doing a fishless cycle to guarantee that it cycles properly)
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Old 04-08-2010, 10:53 PM   #8
 
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Saltwater filtration, if left to run by itself in a different tank (a bathtub, perhaps) full of warm water for a few days, should be cleaned out enough to be suitable for freshwater. However, protein skimmers and the like have no place in a freshwater tank.
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Old 04-08-2010, 11:05 PM   #9
 
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Originally Posted by Fusion MK View Post
Saltwater filtration, if left to run by itself in a different tank (a bathtub, perhaps) full of warm water for a few days, should be cleaned out enough to be suitable for freshwater. However, protein skimmers and the like have no place in a freshwater tank.
I plan on keeping this project as low tech as is healthy, so protein skimmers are something I haven't really looked into.

I'm hoping to stick with a simple play sand substrate, a basic but decent filtration system, and possibly some planting of low-need plants (java mosses and such)

I'd like to be able to have the tank established and healthy, and not overstocked, so that i can keep the maintenance on the lower end (hopefully less than 50 gallon pwc's a week along with regular filter cleaning, or canister changes or whatever is involved with the filtration system I end up with)

I'm not quite sure what more is involved with a tank of that size, but I'm assuming some sort of sump system, or multiple canisters, and then just siphoning/vacuuming the substrate, and mixing up the sand regularly to avoid gas buildup.

At this point, for decoration I'm planning on trying to find cheaper slate and rocks, adding mosses to some of them, and maybe a few large live plants preferably, but the plants are still something I'm looking into.


Is there alot more involved in large tank care that I'm missing here, I imagine it's a whole nother ball game than just having a hob filter and doing small water changes in my 10 gallon, but I'm really not sure how big of a difference I'm really going to be getting myself into.
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Old 04-09-2010, 03:47 AM   #10
 
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Well, "filtration" for a saltwater tank can mean a lot of things. Basically, the same type of filtration you'd want on a freshwater tank, i.e. the type that provides places for bacteria to grow with the ultimate goal of turning ammonia into nitrate, are discouraged in saltwater tanks these days. Such filtration systems are described as "nitrate factories" and because nitrate is so much more harmful in saltwater than in fresh, they're best avoided. Instead, saltwater hobbyists use things like sumps that include live rock rubble, refugiums with macro algae, protein skimmers, deep sand beds (in both the sump/refugium and display tank) and live rock in the display itself to provide filtration. Essentially, the algae in the refugium eats up nitrate and thus discourages algae growth in the display, the sand beds and live rock provide places for anaerobic bacteria which converts nitrate to nitrogen gas to develop and the protein skimmer removes larger waste molecules that contribute to nitrate buildup.

Long story short, it's a very different sort of animal than freshwater filtration. However, that doesn't mean that whoever owns this thing isn't "doing it wrong." He may very well have a whole bunch of "nitrate factories" on that tank, i.e. canister filters, HOB filters, etc. If he does, they can be cleaned thoroughly and used on a freshwater tank no problem. Some of the HOB protein skimmers are sort of combination filters/skimmers and can be used as plain ol' filters (I have a Skilter 250 HOB skimmer that works as a power filter so long as you don't hook up an air pump and use the skimmer tray on top). I guess once you get more details about what exactly comes with the tank you can list it here and we can tell you what will be useful and what won't. Like I said, some of this stuff could be worth a lot of money (protein skimmers, live rock, marine lighting systems, etc.) so would be worth selling and replacing with cheaper freshwater equipment.
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