Suggestions for 10 gallon planted tank?
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Suggestions for 10 gallon planted tank?

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Suggestions for 10 gallon planted tank?
Old 04-03-2013, 12:24 PM   #1
 
Suggestions for 10 gallon planted tank?

I have a 37 gallon aquarium that has been up and running for a while now, so I'd like to turn my attention to setting up a planted (low light plants) 10 gallon bio-wheel aquarium that I've been neglecting. What would you suggest for interesting fish for a tank that size, other than the usual neon tetras? I've been putting off setting up the tank because I don't know of any cool fish that will thrive in a small tank. Thanks.
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Old 04-03-2013, 01:16 PM   #2
 
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There are quite a number of suitable fish for smaller tanks. Many of these will not be what we term the standard store fish, though some are, and often they will be wild caught, which means paying close attention to specific water parameters. So the first question is, what is the GH and pH of your tap water?

Byron.
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Old 04-03-2013, 01:28 PM   #3
 
My tap water is 7.2 and the water is soft, the last time I checked the water the GH was low but can't remember the exact number. I have bogwood and java fern to put in there. The lighting is the standard LED light that comes with the 10 gallon Marineland bio-wheel set-up. I'd possibly like to weigh down some pennywort in the corners and have the java ferns in the back for now. I've got a few nice looking rocks too. I'd like to get some small fish that would do well in a small aquarium but are a little out of the ordinary petsmart selection. Thanks!
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Old 04-03-2013, 05:28 PM   #4
 
How about endlers livebearers and some cherry shrimp?
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Old 04-03-2013, 05:49 PM   #5
 
I would not use the bio wheel for a planted tank. One of the functions of the bio wheel is to grow algae which will compete with plants for nutrients.

In fact I use not filters.

my set instructions.

1) substrate 1" sphagnum peat moss, 1" play sand, 1" pro choice select layered from bottom to top. Each layer wetted then leveled and the tank cleaned.

2) then add plants. 4-6 bunches of anacharsi 4-6 vals, 4-6 small potted plants and a single amazon sword. The idea is a mox of fast growers and slower growers.

3) fill the tank with water poured over a dish.

4) wait 1 week. (this is critical)

5) add a single fish (male platty or guppy for instance)

6) with one week with no food being added. (that is critical also)

7) add a couple of females and start feeding 1 flake per day.

6 months later you will have a tank full of fish and a more or less stable population for years and years.

Just to be sure. no water changes, no chemicals, no mechancal filtration or circulation. Just top off evaporative water with tap water from a commonly used cold water faucet that has been ran for 30 seconds or so.

But that's just my .02
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Old 04-03-2013, 06:17 PM   #6
 
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I wouldlessen the filtration too; a simple sponge is sufficient in a 10g planted tank, or no filter at all.

But to the fish, with soft water you have many options. In our profiles, second heading from the left in the blue bar at the top, check under the Cyprinids for the "dwarf" rasbora species Boraras brigittae and Boraras maculatus [there are some others as mentioned in those profiles that you may find now and then], Celestial Pearl Danio, Eyespot Rasbora, Hengels Rasbora. There are some small gourami in the Antabantids section. Under Characins, the Ember Tetra, some of the pencilfish in Nannostomus [not Nannostomus beckfordi, but any of the others]. For the substrate, oneof the "dwarf" species in Corydoras. The names that shaded can be clicked for that profile.

Byron.
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mcompagno (04-08-2013)
Old 04-08-2013, 03:14 PM   #7
 
Thanks for the suggestions, all are interesting and spark my interest. Great answers, thanks again.
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Old 04-08-2013, 03:46 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
I would not use the bio wheel for a planted tank. One of the functions of the bio wheel is to grow algae which will compete with plants for nutrients.

In fact I use not filters.

my set instructions.

1) substrate 1" sphagnum peat moss, 1" play sand, 1" pro choice select layered from bottom to top. Each layer wetted then leveled and the tank cleaned.

2) then add plants. 4-6 bunches of anacharsi 4-6 vals, 4-6 small potted plants and a single amazon sword. The idea is a mox of fast growers and slower growers.

3) fill the tank with water poured over a dish.

4) wait 1 week. (this is critical)

5) add a single fish (male platty or guppy for instance)

6) with one week with no food being added. (that is critical also)

7) add a couple of females and start feeding 1 flake per day.

6 months later you will have a tank full of fish and a more or less stable population for years and years.

Just to be sure. no water changes, no chemicals, no mechancal filtration or circulation. Just top off evaporative water with tap water from a commonly used cold water faucet that has been ran for 30 seconds or so.

But that's just my .02
i agree with the bio wheel part, but disagree with the algae competing vs plants. as long as conditions are right plants will always win the battle. the bio wheel is NOT made to grow algae but to reduce nitrates by its "wet dry" method of filtration which will REDUCE nitrates that algae LIKES.

in terms of the bio wheel though i removed my wheels from the hob itself, caused to much noise and really agitated the surface more then i was comfortable. as far as the water changes go i disagree with the non water change method. there are countless reasons WHY to change your water and the benefit of a WC GREATLY outweighs the benefits of not changing the water.

also might want to take a look here to get yourself started or a idea of what direction to head.
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...d-tank-144154/
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Old 04-08-2013, 04:16 PM   #9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyMitch View Post
i agree with the bio wheel part, but disagree with the algae competing vs plants. as long as conditions are right plants will always win the battle. the bio wheel is NOT made to grow algae but to reduce nitrates by its "wet dry" method of filtration which will REDUCE nitrates that algae LIKES.

in terms of the bio wheel though i removed my wheels from the hob itself, caused to much noise and really agitated the surface more then i was comfortable. as far as the water changes go i disagree with the non water change method. there are countless reasons WHY to change your water and the benefit of a WC GREATLY outweighs the benefits of not changing the water.

also might want to take a look here to get yourself started or a idea of what direction to head.
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...d-tank-144154/
The bio wheel will not remove nitrate as far as I know. It provides a surface for ammonia and nitrite eating bacteria. Why would you think it removes nitrates (just curious).

I do agree with your suggestion aggressive water changes in any tank. I have planted 37 gallon tank and have noticed that nothing perks up the plants (and the fish for that matter) than a weekly 40-50 percent water change. The plants seem to love water changes.
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Old 04-08-2013, 04:26 PM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcompagno View Post
The bio wheel will not remove nitrate as far as I know. It provides a surface for ammonia and nitrite eating bacteria. Why would you think it removes nitrates (just curious).
ahh brainfart, what makes the wet drys superior to normal "wet" fitlers is the amount of available oxygen. the more oxygen the better the bb can do their job.

i stand corrected, sure its not the last time :P
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