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Substrate Change Question

This is a discussion on Substrate Change Question within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by MMAfish35 I heard that Malaysian Trumpet Snails are great at it. I'm planning on get some of those, along with some ...

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Substrate Change Question
Old 02-12-2013, 09:59 PM   #21
 
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Originally Posted by MMAfish35 View Post
I heard that Malaysian Trumpet Snails are great at it. I'm planning on get some of those, along with some Assassin Snails.

Luke
You will have no MTS if you put Assassin Snails in the tank with them. They will eat other snail species. You could put the Assassin Snails in and feed the MTS to them. They do breed easily.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:23 PM   #22
 
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O I know they eat other snails, thats why I want them. I plan on putting a good amount of MTS in, and having the Assassins in to keep them from taking over the tank. Assassins will also eat blood worms and other meaty foods, so they wont just prey on the MTS.
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Old 02-13-2013, 05:51 AM   #23
 
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Originally Posted by FishyFishy89 View Post
I don't remember, but I don't think MTS breed that easily. I don't remember tho.


ETA: Yes they do breed easily xD I've never gotten any assassin snails. I have loaches tho ;)
Breed like rabbit's
Assassin snail's are slower at reproducing.
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:07 PM   #24
 
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Originally Posted by MMAfish35 View Post
OK, Ok you guys convinced me, I'll just go with all sand lol. Now as for what type of sand, I am undecided. I hear play sand works well, and is inert, but I also hear that it can compact roots. Obviously you have been successful with play sand, so the question is, what do you do to ventilate the sand? I heard that Malaysian Trumpet Snails are great at it. I'm planning on get some of those, along with some Assassin Snails. Also, I heard that pool sand works great too. I like the color better than the color of play sand. Again, I hear it compacts the roots like play sand. Thanks for all the info in advance.

Luke
Compacting sand should not be a problem. First, you don't want the substrate too deep; with sand in the larger tanks an overall depth of 2-3 inches when the sand is in the tank fairly level across the entire surface is sufficient. I have just under 2 inches in my 70g, and 3 inches in my 115g. Second, plant roots release oxygen, lots of it; this keeps the area around the individual plants well oxygenated, and bacteria live there that use the oxygen. Third, burrowing snails (Malaysian Livebearing) contribute to this.

I like play sand because it is inexpensive and natural in appearance; it is identical to the sand in many Amazon streams for example, and you can't get much more natural than that. The mix of colours (black/gray/tan/white) also makes detritus on the substrate less noticeable. That was another issue with my black Flourite, every speck of stuff stood out; but I never see this with mixed substrates.

Pool filter sand is used by many, but you have to avoid the white, and then make sure it is inert and not too rough. I've never bothered with it, but I have read that it can be rather sharp. As can some other types like paver sand, etc. Play Sand is meant for kids to play in.

On the matter of snails reproducing, of course they will. They are there to help you, by getting into places you can't and eating all organic matter, breaking it down so the bacteria can more easily and readily handle it. Keeping them under control is a good idea, sometimes. Depends upon the tank.

Byron.
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Old 02-13-2013, 02:08 PM   #25
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If you want MTS, don't get Assassin Snails. Even though the MTS breed like crazy (live bearing so the fish don't get the eggs) they are mostly nocturnal so you might never see them anyway. Trying to control anything with another addition is not a great idea. See how the MTS make out. I put ten in my tank and have only ever seen two at any given time. I also have tiger snails and pond snails. Tigers don't reproduce in freshwater and the fish always get most of the pond snail eggs. Tigers clean up well, MTS dig up the sand and the pond, well, they just came with some plants.

I don't know what is the largest factor but I rarely see anything on my sand and my vacuuming doesn't pick up much. SOMEBODY seems to be eating almost everything.

Jeff.
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Old 02-13-2013, 02:32 PM   #26
 
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I don't know what is the largest factor but I rarely see anything on my sand and my vacuuming doesn't pick up much. SOMEBODY seems to be eating almost everything.

Jeff.
Same here! This week I'm not really seeing any fish poo. I usually vacuum once a week to remove the majority of the fish poos in the front of the tank, but I'm simply not seeing any and it's the day before vacuuming!

I mean, I see the shrimp and fish pooing, just not seeing a whole lotta poos on the floor o.O
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Old 02-13-2013, 08:17 PM   #27
 
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Compacting sand should not be a problem. First, you don't want the substrate too deep; with sand in the larger tanks an overall depth of 2-3 inches when the sand is in the tank fairly level across the entire surface is sufficient. I have just under 2 inches in my 70g, and 3 inches in my 115g. Second, plant roots release oxygen, lots of it; this keeps the area around the individual plants well oxygenated, and bacteria live there that use the oxygen. Third, burrowing snails (Malaysian Livebearing) contribute to this.

I like play sand because it is inexpensive and natural in appearance; it is identical to the sand in many Amazon streams for example, and you can't get much more natural than that. The mix of colours (black/gray/tan/white) also makes detritus on the substrate less noticeable. That was another issue with my black Flourite, every speck of stuff stood out; but I never see this with mixed substrates.

Pool filter sand is used by many, but you have to avoid the white, and then make sure it is inert and not too rough. I've never bothered with it, but I have read that it can be rather sharp. As can some other types like paver sand, etc. Play Sand is meant for kids to play in.

On the matter of snails reproducing, of course they will. They are there to help you, by getting into places you can't and eating all organic matter, breaking it down so the bacteria can more easily and readily handle it. Keeping them under control is a good idea, sometimes. Depends upon the tank.

Byron.
Play sand sounds like the way to go. It's cheap too. I'll put in some MTS to help out too. Maybe I'll let them take off a bit, and if need be I'll get some Assassins. Thanks for the help. I'll post pics when I get it all changed over.
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Old 02-14-2013, 09:50 AM   #28
 
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Play sand sounds like the way to go. It's cheap too. I'll put in some MTS to help out too. Maybe I'll let them take off a bit, and if need be I'll get some Assassins. Thanks for the help. I'll post pics when I get it all changed over.

I would add some peat mass also. to prevent hardness increases over time.

FWIW I do nothing for snails.

What happens is I do get a snail bloom but a year later the tank is down to only a few. I guess the population is self limiting.

my .02
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:46 AM   #29
 
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Playsand is inert. I've had playsand in my betta tank for 3 years and I've never seen an increase in water hardness.

Last edited by FishyFishy89; 02-14-2013 at 10:50 AM..
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