Stocking New 20 Gal - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Stocking New 20 Gal

Stocking New 20 Gal

This is a discussion on Stocking New 20 Gal within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> awesome, you guys are really helpful! i'm not sure of my tap water peramaters, i put water conditioner in it and had it running ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Platy
Platy
Mosquito Rasbora
Mosquito Rasbora
Reply
Old 12-01-2010, 07:53 PM   #11
 
awesome, you guys are really helpful! i'm not sure of my tap water peramaters, i put water conditioner in it and had it running for about a week, right now just my betta is in it and i'm hoping to add the corys and tetras soon. black ruby barbs also if i can find them, i suppose i'll end up taking the betta out. i want to add a pearl gourami and will def remove the betta in that case. i guess my tank might be pretty full at that point. i'd like maybe one or 2 fish that stand out however.
NewFisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 07:57 PM   #12
 
Byron's Avatar
 
I will merge this thread with your other as the issues are identical.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 07:59 PM   #13
 
thanks, i couldnt figure out how to delete the first one.
NewFisher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 08:01 PM   #14
 
Byron's Avatar
 
OK, now that's done...there are some issues with the ideas in your last post, could you have a look please at my posts in the second thread which are now here. No point repeating everything.

Re the water parameters, your water supply folks can tell you the hardness and pH of your water, they may have a website with this info and a list of what's in the water (minerals, nitrates, etc). This is a must-know, as the tap water may determine this or that with respect to fish. A t4st kit is also highly recommended, the API liquid test kit is good quality, there is a Master that includes pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate; this is well worth having when setting up an aquarium. Fish stores will often do water tests, but running back and forth every day or so can be a nuisance.

Byron.

Last edited by Byron; 12-01-2010 at 08:05 PM..
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 08:50 PM   #15
 
Not trying to confuse you, my friend, but these days the pH and most of the water parameter stuff is just not an issue. The vast majority of fish you will get a your local fish store are hatchery raised, predominantly in higher pH and harder water conditions. I keep altum angels, for example, in very hard, high pH Houston TX tap water with no issues whatsoever-- and these are wild caught! You can see a clear image of these fish on my website under the "Hardscape Only" gallery. Unless you are trying to breed fish or induce some very specific behaviors, this whole pH matching business only confuses and deters new hobbyists unnecessarily.
Why can I say this with profound certainty? Because it's my life- my career- my absolute passion and I have an unmatched portfolio to back it up. We have over 500 fully aquascaped, freshwater aquariums of every imaginable size and makeup in our care and we do not test water and do not concern ourselves with matching "parameters" for the vast majority of fishes- right up to cardinal and rummy-nose tetras, discus, and many other notoriously "sensitive" fish. I only point this out to offer a powerful visual reference to substantiate what I am saying, not to brag. The Internet doesn't need any more "self-styled experts", and that's all I'd be without proof.
I'd rather see you be able to focus on creating and enjoyable, engaging aquascape rather than fretting over what pH your tap water is. I'm telling you in more than most cases the common fish you will be keeping will and/or already are perfectly adapted to your tap condition.
In a tank your size, you may want to consider more of a themed tank- not trying to squeeze too many different species, but rather a feature fish, and accompanying/complimentary school around them, and a bottom dweller group to complete the scene. Maybe think about the creation of an underwater scene- an aquascaped- and not just a "fishy tank". Tetras, many small barbs, danios, rasbora, cory cats, dwarf loaches, dwarf rainbows- all pose viable, interesting options for a 20 gal. I mean, if you want, I (or many here) could spec some specific combinations for you, but you probably get the idea!

I will defend but not argue about the above comments. Ive been doing this too long and at too high a level to argue about realities that I experience and deliver on for hundreds of clients everyday. It pains me to see so many new hobbysist frustrated and turned off to the hobby because of being overwhelmed with factoids and details that are not "incorrect", but often unnecessary.
jsenske is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 09:34 PM   #16
 
Hi im thinking you should do
5 sworzi corys

2 gouramis

Some tetras mabe red eyed

and then add on start out slow at first..
dylanfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2010, 09:57 AM   #17
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsenske View Post
Not trying to confuse you, my friend, but these days the pH and most of the water parameter stuff is just not an issue. The vast majority of fish you will get a your local fish store are hatchery raised, predominantly in higher pH and harder water conditions. I keep altum angels, for example, in very hard, high pH Houston TX tap water with no issues whatsoever-- and these are wild caught! You can see a clear image of these fish on my website under the "Hardscape Only" gallery. Unless you are trying to breed fish or induce some very specific behaviors, this whole pH matching business only confuses and deters new hobbyists unnecessarily.
Why can I say this with profound certainty? Because it's my life- my career- my absolute passion and I have an unmatched portfolio to back it up. We have over 500 fully aquascaped, freshwater aquariums of every imaginable size and makeup in our care and we do not test water and do not concern ourselves with matching "parameters" for the vast majority of fishes- right up to cardinal and rummy-nose tetras, discus, and many other notoriously "sensitive" fish. I only point this out to offer a powerful visual reference to substantiate what I am saying, not to brag. The Internet doesn't need any more "self-styled experts", and that's all I'd be without proof.
I'd rather see you be able to focus on creating and enjoyable, engaging aquascape rather than fretting over what pH your tap water is. I'm telling you in more than most cases the common fish you will be keeping will and/or already are perfectly adapted to your tap condition.
In a tank your size, you may want to consider more of a themed tank- not trying to squeeze too many different species, but rather a feature fish, and accompanying/complimentary school around them, and a bottom dweller group to complete the scene. Maybe think about the creation of an underwater scene- an aquascaped- and not just a "fishy tank". Tetras, many small barbs, danios, rasbora, cory cats, dwarf loaches, dwarf rainbows- all pose viable, interesting options for a 20 gal. I mean, if you want, I (or many here) could spec some specific combinations for you, but you probably get the idea!

I will defend but not argue about the above comments. Ive been doing this too long and at too high a level to argue about realities that I experience and deliver on for hundreds of clients everyday. It pains me to see so many new hobbysist frustrated and turned off to the hobby because of being overwhelmed with factoids and details that are not "incorrect", but often unnecessary.
I would generally agree, but only to a point. If one has soft water coming out of the tap, maintaining livebearers will be impossible. And I also speak from experience. I live in Vancouver, and the water here, as in neighbouring Seattle, Washington, is very soft. Aquarists have no success with livebearers unless they harden the water, which fortunately is very easy to do with calcareous rock/gravel or certain preparations.

As for soft water fish maintained in hard water, those that are tank-raised for generations may adapt. I say may because unless you dissect the fish and examine it, it is next to impossible to be absolute. Some fish are more adaptable. Some are not. You mention cardinal tetra; if you have managed to maintain these fish healthy for more than 10 years in your harder water, I would be interested to hear that. They have a 10-year lifespan, if maintained in very soft slightly acidic water, as Dr. Jacques Gery ascertained. In hard water they develop calcium blockage of the kidneys and seldom live beyond a couple of years. I suspect many of the very soft water fish react the same. And these are largely wild-caught, which obvious also makes a considerable difference.

It is also proven that many tank-raised fish maintained in hard water do not have the colour of their counterparts maintained in less hard water. The fact that many soft-water species will not spawn in hard water, or if they do the eggs will not hatch, indicates that the hardness does have an effect on the fish. The fish may manage, but obviously it is not in the best environment, and numerable other health and behavioral issues may likely result solely due to this fact.

Dr. Stanley Weitzman, Emeritus Research Professor at the Smithsonian in Washington, DC, and an acknowledged authority on characoid fishes, wrote a series of articles in TFH in the 1990's wherein he set out that soft water fish absolutely must be maintained long-term in soft water to avoid internal issues. Neither Dr. Weitzman nor any other ichthyologist of standing has countered those articles to this day. I think it behooves us to take heed.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2010, 11:13 AM   #18
 
Not sure how I let myself into this one... I know– science trumps all in the end. My apologies to the OP-- poor guy just trying to get his new 20 gallon stocked. What should be a simple question with simple suggestions turns into something more complicated (my fault, agreed). My goals are usually not spawning and producing contest-winning fish (in most cases), but rather an aquarium that is more of an overall experience/presence in the space. I'm probably in the minority in those terms, especially as forum conversations and expert opinions go.

And no, my cardinal tetras didn't live 10 years in hardwater conditions- honestly I don't tend to keep any one layout up that long. After 2-3 years either myself or my client is generally desiring a new look.

Bottom line NewFisher: I would avoid wild caught and touchy, condition-specific fishes when stocking your first/new 20 gallon aquarium. There's literally hundreds of options and combinations. Most fish are going to adapt and be fine.

I apologize for my attempt to simplify and inspire. Do enjoy your tank!
jsenske is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stocking for my new 55g Magzmoir Cichlids 19 07-19-2010 06:03 PM
fun fun fun stocking!!! teddyzaper Freshwater and Tropical Fish 4 10-31-2009 11:35 AM
Stocking my 20g Opliter Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 10-03-2009 06:50 PM
10 G Stocking Malcolm Little Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 8 09-08-2009 04:36 PM
Stocking LincolnS Freshwater and Tropical Fish 6 03-03-2008 08:27 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:56 AM.