Stocking lists?
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Stocking lists?

This is a discussion on Stocking lists? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I'm trying to creat a few stocking lists for my 10 gallon tank(: I want to base my choices off of the water from ...

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Old 05-15-2011, 11:36 PM   #1
 
Stocking lists?

I'm trying to creat a few stocking lists for my 10 gallon tank(: I want to base my choices off of the water from my tap but I have no idea how to find out what they are by looking online? I live in southern California but I'm not sure if thats too broad... can anyone help? I can pm you my location.

Some of the fish I REALLY love are: bristlenose pleccos; pygmy corries; DARIO DARIO; platys?; most livebearers; mosquito rasboras; neons, gourami(heard they're sickly though);

and lots of others, but those would be my top choices depending on the hardeness ect.
I also have a halfmoon betta who has a small tank and wouldn't mind upgrading with some peacefull fish^^
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:56 AM   #2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin8D View Post
I'm trying to creat a few stocking lists for my 10 gallon tank(: I want to base my choices off of the water from my tap but I have no idea how to find out what they are by looking online? I live in southern California but I'm not sure if thats too broad... can anyone help? I can pm you my location.

Some of the fish I REALLY love are: bristlenose pleccos; pygmy corries; DARIO DARIO; platys?; most livebearers; mosquito rasboras; neons, gourami(heard they're sickly though);

and lots of others, but those would be my top choices depending on the hardeness ect.
I also have a halfmoon betta who has a small tank and wouldn't mind upgrading with some peacefull fish^^

As far as putting a betta in with other fish i have been sucessful with a 10 gallon having a male and female betta, 3 danios, and 2 sucker fish
they all live on different levels and the bettas would have enough room from each other. i had that tank going until i threw in 13 gold fish
PS bad idea to do, killed everthing including themselves except 2 danios, and one of those danios lived though probably a couple of hundered fish that i added to his tank that all died except him, had him for 5 years, just died alone in my 29 gallon bout 6 months ago, but im up and running with fish again


IF i had the extra tank
i would do that set up again with the sucker fish danios and bettas
it looked rather marvlous
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Old 05-16-2011, 03:36 AM   #3
 
Hello

Come on.
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Old 05-16-2011, 05:27 AM   #4
 
Having your own test kit is very useful. If you can't afford one, then try asking your local fish store (not a chain store) - pH and hardness are the important factors to ask about - they should know - give them a call
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:43 AM   #5
 
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First, contact your water supply people and find out the hardness and pH of your tap water. Many have websites with water data posted, it is public information. If you find the website and can't decipher it, provide the link and I will take a look. You should have a pH kit, but I would not waste money on a hardness kit as once you know the tap water hardness you will not use it again.

Once we know what is coming out of the tap, selecting suitable fish will be relatively easy. While many are somewhat adaptable, some are not. One general comment, i would not have any gourami except for the pygmy sparkling gourami in a 10g with other fish. But aside from this, the other named species are possible, once we know the water.

Byron.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:19 PM   #6
 
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First, contact your water supply people and find out the hardness and pH of your tap water. Many have websites with water data posted, it is public information. If you find the website and can't decipher it, provide the link and I will take a look. You should have a pH kit, but I would not waste money on a hardness kit as once you know the tap water hardness you will not use it again.

Once we know what is coming out of the tap, selecting suitable fish will be relatively easy. While many are somewhat adaptable, some are not. One general comment, i would not have any gourami except for the pygmy sparkling gourami in a 10g with other fish. But aside from this, the other named species are possible, once we know the water.

Byron.
http://www.buenapark.com/Modules/Sho...documentid=625

That seems to have a lot of the information on it, but I'm not sure if it's detailed enough or not... and its from a few years ago and I can't find a recent one :/ The chart is on the bottom(:
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Old 05-16-2011, 04:29 PM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Erin8D View Post
http://www.buenapark.com/Modules/Sho...documentid=625

That seems to have a lot of the information on it, but I'm not sure if it's detailed enough or not... and its from a few years ago and I can't find a recent one :/ The chart is on the bottom(:
Right, here's what I deduce from the data in that chart; and I took the lower figures being the ground plus surface water since they say this combination provides the tap water.

Calcium and magnesium, the two principle minerals of general hardness (GH), are not high, but total hardness is stated to be 154-247 which is 12-14 dGH. That's not bad, in the medium hard range. All of the other minerals obviously contribute to this.

The pH is quite high, 8.1-8.3. This is likely to be fairly stable, due to the high bicarbonates. These are shown as HCO3 and given as 204-221 ppm, which equates to around 12 dKH. KH acts as a buffer to prevent shifts in pH. This will work to maintain the pH high rather than allowing it to acidify as it naturally does in an aquarium that is not buffered.

Nitrate is good, from non-detectable to a high of 4.9. Ammonia is not singled out, so I will assume it is within this nitrogen range since they do mention nitrate, nitrite and nitrogen. No problems here.

What all this equates to is medium or moderately hard water that is high in alkalinity and pH. Livebearers will be right at home. There are also other species that prefer this range; Celestial Pearl Danio and Emerald dwarf Rasbora come to mind, both do not do well in soft water but would thrive in yours.

Wild caught soft water fish such as Dario dario and Mosquito rasbora may struggle though. However, the good news is that with a relatively small tank (10g) it is not difficult to soften the water by diluting it and thus reduce the pH naturally. You can do this with rainwater (collected safely), distilled water or RO (reverse osmosis) water. The volumes for mixing will vary according to the initial source water (tap water) but with some experimentation it is possible to achieve a good medium soft water. And having organic elements in the aquarium (wood, leaves, etc) helps in this and works to maintain stability. Smaller partial water changes using similarly mixed water will also aid in this.

Byron.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:03 AM   #8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Right, here's what I deduce from the data in that chart; and I took the lower figures being the ground plus surface water since they say this combination provides the tap water.

Calcium and magnesium, the two principle minerals of general hardness (GH), are not high, but total hardness is stated to be 154-247 which is 12-14 dGH. That's not bad, in the medium hard range. All of the other minerals obviously contribute to this.

The pH is quite high, 8.1-8.3. This is likely to be fairly stable, due to the high bicarbonates. These are shown as HCO3 and given as 204-221 ppm, which equates to around 12 dKH. KH acts as a buffer to prevent shifts in pH. This will work to maintain the pH high rather than allowing it to acidify as it naturally does in an aquarium that is not buffered.

Nitrate is good, from non-detectable to a high of 4.9. Ammonia is not singled out, so I will assume it is within this nitrogen range since they do mention nitrate, nitrite and nitrogen. No problems here.

What all this equates to is medium or moderately hard water that is high in alkalinity and pH. Livebearers will be right at home. There are also other species that prefer this range; Celestial Pearl Danio and Emerald dwarf Rasbora come to mind, both do not do well in soft water but would thrive in yours.

Wild caught soft water fish such as Dario dario and Mosquito rasbora may struggle though. However, the good news is that with a relatively small tank (10g) it is not difficult to soften the water by diluting it and thus reduce the pH naturally. You can do this with rainwater (collected safely), distilled water or RO (reverse osmosis) water. The volumes for mixing will vary according to the initial source water (tap water) but with some experimentation it is possible to achieve a good medium soft water. And having organic elements in the aquarium (wood, leaves, etc) helps in this and works to maintain stability. Smaller partial water changes using similarly mixed water will also aid in this.

Byron.
I did some reading on them, and although they are beautiful, many people say they are too shy, and need TIP TOP water conditions. I would feel safer with hardier fish, since I often am to busy and forget every once in a while. I love the dario dario but I might save them for the future once I have a better grip on my fishkeeping skills.

The list that I think might work now is...

-1 male betta
-9 pygmy corries
-1 bristlenose plecco

Would that work okay? I know you aren't keen on bettas for community ( i see a lot of your posts ) but I've always had wonderful experiences with them, and I have one in a 1 gallon tank that would most likely love to be upgraded.

Similarly, all those fish read tolerating medium hard water, and I adore them greatly. The tank would be planted to a degree and have driftwood for the little plecco and corrie to hide in^^ My LFS just got black moon sand! I'm really excited(:
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Old 05-18-2011, 09:18 AM   #9
 
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Substrate fish generally work with a Betta; it is anything mid-water that may (I say may) cause issues, either to the Betta or from the Betta. There are always exceptions in fish as there are with dogs or people for that matter, but with fish it is best to lean on the side of probable rather than possibly.

I would not include the BN; a 4-inch fish in a 10g is going to be "obvious" and will have an impact on water conditions. In smaller tanks, keeping the fish reasonable close in size is better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin8D View Post
I did some reading on them, and although they are beautiful, many people say they are too shy, and need TIP TOP water conditions. I would feel safer with hardier fish, since I often am to busy and forget every once in a while. I love the dario dario but I might save them for the future once I have a better grip on my fishkeeping skills.

The list that I think might work now is...

-1 male betta
-9 pygmy corries
-1 bristlenose plecco

Would that work okay? I know you aren't keen on bettas for community ( i see a lot of your posts ) but I've always had wonderful experiences with them, and I have one in a 1 gallon tank that would most likely love to be upgraded.

Similarly, all those fish read tolerating medium hard water, and I adore them greatly. The tank would be planted to a degree and have driftwood for the little plecco and corrie to hide in^^ My LFS just got black moon sand! I'm really excited(:
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Old 05-18-2011, 09:31 AM   #10
 
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+1, the BN pleco would be a bit large for the tank.. In my experience, sucker fish in a small tank tend to move with sudden jerky movements.. (leaping from one side of the tank to the other).

While peaceful, I wouldn't rule out the possibility of one accidentally injuring the betta.

I think a Betta, the cories, and a handful of tracked or striped nerite snails would make a nice presentation
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