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Stocking 10 Gallon?

This is a discussion on Stocking 10 Gallon? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I would not have a male Betta in a tank with small colourful fish; while it is not always the case, it most often ...

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Old 06-08-2011, 03:19 PM   #11
 
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I would not have a male Betta in a tank with small colourful fish; while it is not always the case, it most often is that the Betta will attack the colourful Endlers Livebearer and guppy. Also, they might nip its fins in reverse.

There are several small species in the Cyprinid order of fish that would admirably suit a 10g hard water tank. Some are in our profiles, click on the shaded name:
Emerald Dwarf Rasbora
Dario dario
Celestial Pearl Danio

In a well-planted tank, a group of any one of these would be very beautiful, as they are all very colourful fish.

I would be cautious with pygmy cory in hard water. Medium hard with a basic pH in the 7's is liable to work, but very hard will not.

If you do have common livebearers (platy, guppy, endler) be careful of having male and female. The tank will be over-crowded very quickly.

Byron.
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Old 06-08-2011, 07:40 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by Teishokue View Post
i would suggest bb gobies be in a species tank. and your 2nd tank should have a community tank. endlers are too many. betta will nip long fins. benthic fish wont work together as they require a certain ammount of aquarium floor to survive. for your tank 2 i suggest adding 1 java fern, easy to care, easy to clean.
What size tank do you suggest I keep two in? They seem to be doing fine but fish are hard to read.

My 2nd tank is a community tank 0.o

I've read up to 30 fit perfectly fine in a ten with no other fish, so I though cutting in half would do justice here? But how many would you suggest?

I'll take the betta out(:

The corries would be the only benthic fish in the tank, since the gobies are always in my giant anubias and other plants(:

I can't since the second tank won't have a light on it(:
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Old 06-09-2011, 01:28 AM   #13
 
java fern doesnt need so much light. room lighting or a slight light from the window will do for java ferns. unlesss you have them in the basement with absolute 0 light. the bb gobies. i have 10 in my 20 gal. they do perfectly fine with other fish in there also. although fin nip do occur. i suggest a slight saline condition for anything in with the bb gobies. since fin nip occurs, fin rot prevalence will be higher. For bb gobies, i like to keep them in a large group as big as 6-10. my past experience, they have died faster than when in a group. just to make sure you know gobies. gobies are benthic. and in my preference they do like a good wall with things that they can sit on and gaze upon the tank. its interesting how the goby society works.

its just that gobies can be in a community tank. but alot of fin nip will occur and fin rot begins and a snowball rolls down a hill till it gets really big. just a bit of salt will help prevent rotting. as long as your gobies are eating well, they do very good. that is the only hard part about gobies.

what are you feeding your gobies?

as for a java fern, very little light is required, very little co2 is needed to be added. and they will prosper in your tank. this is a very easy very hardy plant to grow. as long as you dont stick it into the gravel. attach it to a log or wood or rock they will grow fast.
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Old 06-09-2011, 12:42 PM   #14
 
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I have merged the two threads into one.
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Old 06-09-2011, 12:51 PM   #15
 
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You might have gotten lucky, and gotten a mated pair of goby purely by coincidence...

I agree that you need to reconsider tank one- 6 celestial pearl danio and 2 BB Goby would probably be quite happy.

Tank two looks good, but I would avoid fish with finnage... Colorful fish with short fins like platies could work.. It depends on the Betta. (Some are nicer than others.)

For the record, I do not agree with salt dosing to freshwater fish as a preventative measure. If you think there will be fin-nipping, then move your fish around. Don't stress the fish out more by adding salt.
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Old 06-09-2011, 04:47 PM   #16
 
first of all, they arent mated pair. as freshwater mate once and leave. 2nd thingis that bb gobies are brackish fish and that species (assuming its pure bb) is freshwater tolerant. moving the fish will stress more than a 1.0005 saline. salt actually helps prevent fin rot and increases gill function. also a higher salinity will cause the fish to produce more slime coat,increasing the resistance to infections and parasites.
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Old 06-09-2011, 05:12 PM   #17
 
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Salt is detrimental to freshwater fish [not considering brackish fish here] in varying degrees. To understand why, we must understand what salt does in water.

Salt makes the water more dense than the same water without salt. The aquarium contains water. The bodies of fish also contain water [just as we do--we are, what is it, 70-some percent water?]. The water in the aquarium and the water in the fish are separated by a semi-permeable layer which is the cell. Water can pass through this cell. When either body of water is more dense, the other less-dense body of water will pass through the membrane to equalize the water on both sides.

Water is constantly passing through the cells of fish by osmosis in an attempt to equate the water inside the fish (which is more dense) with the water in the aquarium. Put another way, the aquarium water is diluting the fish's body water until they are equal. Freshwater fish regularly excrete this water through respiration and urination. This is the issue behind pH differences as well as salt and other substances. It increases the fish's work--the kidney is used in the case of salt--which also increases the fish's stress in order to maintain their internal stability. Also, the fish tends to produce more mucus especially in the gills; the reason is due to the irritant property of salt--the fish is simply trying to get away from it.

Dr. Stanley Weitzman, who is Emeritus Research Scientist at the Department of Ichthyology of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington and an acknowledged authority on characoid fishes, writes that 100 ppm of salt is the maximum for characins, and there are several species that show considerable stress leading to death at 60 ppm. 100 ppm is equal to .38 of one gram of salt per gallon of water. One level teaspoon holds six grams of salt, so 1 tsp of salt per gallon equates to more than 15 times the tolerable amount. Livebearers have a higher tolerance (mollies sometimes exist in brackish water) so the salt may be safe for them.
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Old 06-10-2011, 11:52 AM   #18
 
u do know im only talking about a minute amt. just because 1 researchers find that a large amt of salt will kill the fish doesnt mean its bad. it is just lime vitamins, too much will cause problems, too little will also cause problems. his findings are about the limitation of salt towards a particular species, not if is detrimental.
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Old 06-10-2011, 12:18 PM   #19
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teishokue View Post
u do know im only talking about a minute amt. just because 1 researchers find that a large amt of salt will kill the fish doesnt mean its bad. it is just lime vitamins, too much will cause problems, too little will also cause problems. his findings are about the limitation of salt towards a particular species, not if is detrimental.
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Salt at any level is highly detrimental to any soft water fish. Your original post did not differentiate so I was clarifying; brackish water fish is a very different thing.

As for Dr. Weitzman, I doubt anyone alive knows what he does about soft water fish. And he was referring to all species of characidae.

I am not talking "opinions" but scientific fact; if you can counter it scientifically, do so.
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Old 06-13-2011, 11:57 AM   #20
 
Hi. I see that you want to add a betta with guppies. Many people have said that they will nip fins but this hasn't been a problem for me. My betta is quite peaceful and only chases my guppies when they steal his food
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