Starting new 20 gallon freshwater aquarium - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Starting new 20 gallon freshwater aquarium

Starting new 20 gallon freshwater aquarium

This is a discussion on Starting new 20 gallon freshwater aquarium within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> That makes a lot of sense. With that in mind, are there any non-live bearing fish I can put with the Guppies? Or should ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Bleeding Heart Tetra
Bleeding Heart Tetra
Badis
Badis
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Starting new 20 gallon freshwater aquarium
Old 05-02-2009, 09:10 AM   #21
 
That makes a lot of sense. With that in mind, are there any non-live bearing fish I can put with the Guppies? Or should I just forget about the guppies all together and go with Tetras and a dwarf gourami (if that works). I would like that setup as well.
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2009, 09:17 AM   #22
 
The chart also indicates that a Betta would work in this setup. What do you guys think of my 20 gal aquarium with the equipment above, various types of tetra, a Betta and a Dwarf Gourami? This setup sounds really good to me.

Speaking of Betta, I have a betta now in a 3 gallon cycled tank (i know that is small to be cycled but i have tested it regularly and it seems to be good) with an undergravel filter. Is there a way I can use that betta (Jovi) or his water to cycle this tank more quickly? Of course I do not want to cause any undue stress on Jovi. Thanks again!
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2009, 03:31 PM   #23
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pillar View Post
The chart also indicates that a Betta would work in this setup. What do you guys think of my 20 gal aquarium with the equipment above, various types of tetra, a Betta and a Dwarf Gourami? This setup sounds really good to me.

Speaking of Betta, I have a betta now in a 3 gallon cycled tank (i know that is small to be cycled but i have tested it regularly and it seems to be good) with an undergravel filter. Is there a way I can use that betta (Jovi) or his water to cycle this tank more quickly? Of course I do not want to cause any undue stress on Jovi. Thanks again!
Two posts here, first was:
That makes a lot of sense. With that in mind, are there any non-live bearing fish I can put with the Guppies? Or should I just forget about the guppies all together and go with Tetras and a dwarf gourami (if that works). I would like that setup as well.

The livebearers come from Central America and Mexico, and Carribean islands. There are (I would assume) non-livebearers from this region, but you know, I've never come across them. Others who know these locales/fish better than I do will probably have some suggestions. SA tetras and SE Asian fish will do nicely together because their water requirements are (in most cases) similar if not identical, soft and acidic. Shoaling fish from SE Asia are not as many as SA but would include rasbora: the familiar Harlequin (Rasbora heteromorpha or Trigonostigma rasbora) and the similarly-patterned and coloured rasbora Trigonostigma espei, the pygmy Rasbora maculata, Rasbora trilineata...the list is almost endless. I've attached some photos below for interest.

To the second post, I have reaqd from others about Betta being targets or being territorial, not sure how this goes with gouramis, so will leave this question to others with more knowledge.

As for cycling, I would not subject the betta to a new tank to cycle it. And the water is all but useless as there is little and more likely no bacteria in it (the bacteria colonize surfaces), it would be more useful to move the gravel into the new tank. But before you consider that--I would leave Jovi comfortable in his present home and cycle the new tank on its own. Using a biological product like "Cycle" significantly eases the stress on fish when cycling a tank (use only fairly hardy fish, nothing delicate) and you can cycle a tank with fish food (no fish, just put flake food in the tank as if you were feeding the tank inhabitants and it will start the cycle).

Not that I'm suggesting you do it, but if you were to move gravel or a filter to cycle a new tank remember that for the bacteria in it to continue to live they must have a source of food (ammonia for nitrosomonas bacteria, nitrite for nitrobacter bacteria) sufficient for their numbers or they will quickly die off. This would result in no bacteria and the tank would still have to be cycled. Cycling is a tedious process--waiting 2-8 weeks before being able to start adding those fish you want--but it is necessary.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Trigonostigma_heteromorpha_2.jpg (24.2 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg Rasbora Maculata.jpg (39.7 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg Rasbora pauciperforata.jpg (7.6 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg Rasbora trilineata.jpg (26.8 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg Rasbora espei.jpg (22.0 KB, 19 views)
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2009, 09:06 PM   #24
 
Thanks for the info!

I have the aquarium cycling now as per directions here: Tropical Fish Centre - Fishless Cycling Revisited. I decided to try fishless cycling because due to my research it happens faster, and it reduces the risk of fish loss, and I feel a great deal of guilt when my actions hurt a fish.

I used the recommended dose of cycle and a decoration from Jovi's tank as my source of bacteria, and I will monitor the water parameters closely until the cycle is complete.

I am currently reading about Bettas and Gouramis, and they seem to be fine together most of the time. My plan is to establish the tank, add Jovi to it then get another betta once Jovi has (hopefully) been accepted by his new friends. This way I can guarentee that Jovi will have a good home, and my new Betta will too! If the Gourami doesn't like it I will abort the plan. I also plan to put one tetra in Jovi's tank to maintain the nitrifying bacteria.

Please let me know if this is a good plan! Thanks again!
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2009, 07:48 AM   #25
 
Also, the tap water here is slightly basic (pH 7.6) and what I interpret as soft (one drop changes color in the hardness test). My research indicates that tetra and gourami require more acidic water, so would I need to take action to alter the water pH?
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2009, 09:46 AM   #26
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pillar View Post
Also, the tap water here is slightly basic (pH 7.6) and what I interpret as soft (one drop changes color in the hardness test). My research indicates that tetra and gourami require more acidic water, so would I need to take action to alter the water pH?
Some fish are more adaptable (with no "obvious" problems) than others. I would not try cardinal tetras in a pH of 7.5, although if the water is very soft it might work. Harder water can cause calcium deposits internally, leading to stress and usually death.

If you decide to alter the pH in your aquarium, do it with peat in the filter. Chemicals can sometimes cause fluctuations in the pH where it keeps going down and back up, depending upon the buffering capability of the water. I do not recommend altering pH with any chemicals. Aside from peat, using a RO system works; you would mix a bit of normal water with the RO treated water as you need to have some mineral content or the water is too sterile for fish (and plants). I'm lucky in having water out of the tap that is soft and slightly acidic at 6.8, and the biological actions in my two present aquaria keep the pH around 6.5 constantly (with the normal diurnal variation it goes from 6.4 to 6.6 and back every 24 hours, and this is natural and OK). In fact, I have a very small nylon bag of dolomite in both filter chambers to ensure the pH does not fall and in 12+ years this has never failed me.

A quick comment on getting a second betta--I understand this doesn't always work due to aggression. I will just mention this, and leave it to those with betta experience to explain, or correct me.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2009, 10:05 AM   #27
 
Update: Its actually 3 drops that changes the color, I was confusing two different tests. According to the info that came with the test kit, that is still considered soft.

Just to be clear, the general hardness and Carbonate hardness are 30ppm and 40 ppm respectively.

So from this, it seems that the water is pretty soft, and ok for tetras, but the pH is still an issue. I have noticed that a lot of fish stores around here have driftwood in their aquariums, possibly to combat the high pH of the local water. Might I try the same?

Also, about the peat. Is this something I should buy at a fish store, or can I just pull some out of the ground? Near my house there is a large bog.

Thanks again!
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2009, 10:12 AM   #28
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pillar View Post
Update: Its actually 3 drops that changes the color, I was confusing two different tests. According to the info that came with the test kit, that is still considered soft.

Just to be clear, the general hardness and Carbonate hardness are 30ppm and 40 ppm respectively.

So from this, it seems that the water is pretty soft, and ok for tetras, but the pH is still an issue. I have noticed that a lot of fish stores around here have driftwood in their aquariums, possibly to combat the high pH of the local water. Might I try the same?

Also, about the peat. Is this something I should buy at a fish store, or can I just pull some out of the ground? Near my house there is a large bog.

Thanks again!
Bogwood when new will leech tannin into the water (turns it slightly yellowish-brownish, fine for the fish but not nice to look at for some aquarists) but once the initial period is over this dissipates and the tannic release is very slow. It does help to lower pH and hardness, but unless you had tons of it in the tank, or depending upon the type of wood, it would probably not be that significant.

I've read that peat collected from bogs can be used, if treated to remove critters, and I'm sure others on this forum have experience with this so I'll leave it to them to explain for you.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2009, 10:36 AM   #29
 
Well I really like the look of wood anyway, so I think I will get a big hunk of it for the tank. If that doesn't work I will research using peat in the filter.

I have also read that you should soak the wood in aquarium water before putting it in the tank, which is no problem. It will also be a good opportunity to see how it affects the water chemistry.

Thanks!
pillar is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Starting up a planted ten gallon freshwater tank in a couple days, fishman09 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 3 01-04-2009 02:40 AM
New Freshwater 55 gallon aquarium! help! PhishPhood Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 9 12-05-2008 12:02 PM
Starting a 29 gallon freshwater tank Gunney87 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 29 10-17-2008 10:34 AM
Starting freshwater aquarium James Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 4 07-03-2008 06:17 PM
Starting fish for my new 36 gallon aquarium ShawnMcc Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 05-20-2007 04:12 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:07 PM.