Springtime water check! - Page 3
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Springtime water check!

Springtime water check!

This is a discussion on Springtime water check! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by JDM It works. I still change water each week (most weeks) but even after a three week stretch the nitrates did ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Spotted Driftwood Cat
Spotted Driftwood Cat
Pictus Catfish
Pictus Catfish
Like Tree19Likes

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
Springtime water check!
Old 03-20-2013, 10:23 AM   #21
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDM View Post
It works. I still change water each week (most weeks) but even after a three week stretch the nitrates did not cross 5ppm. I'm not certain which plants are responsible as I have 16 varieties now... but that's just details. Of course a lot of this has to do with the plants taking up the ammonia in the first place so it does not go through the bacterial nitrification process and the little bit that does does not produce enough nitrates to be concerned about.

I do expect that, at some point, I will see zero nitrates without changing water.. but it's not my goal, just an interesting side bar.

Jeff.

One of the real fustrating things on our (or at least my) tanks is you finally do get nitrates down hopefully to unmeasureable levels. Then in a very short while (like a week or so) the tank is covered with cyano.


But those things just keep this hobby interesting.

my .02

Last edited by SeaHorse; 03-20-2013 at 10:30 AM..
beaslbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 10:34 AM   #22
JDM
 
JDM's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
One of the real fustrating things on our (or at least my) tanks is you finally do get nitrates down hopefully to unmeasureable levels. Then in a very short while (like a week or so) the tank is covered with cyano.


But those things just keep this hobby interesting.

my .02
Hmmm.... maybe regular water changes might help to keep whatever is building up in your tanks low enough to not promote cyano?


Couldn't resist.

Jeff.
VerdantGrotto likes this.
JDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 12:26 PM   #23
 
jentralala's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
FWIW, IME, IMHO and so on.

The following statement is absolutely true.

The only reason you have measurable nitrates (or ammonia, or nitrites, or phosphates, or anything) is because your tank is not reducing those as they are being added or created.

Whether or not that results in a course of action is a completely seperate question.

In my case I just use plant life (Fw plants, marine algae) to achieve unmeasureable nitrates.

But that's just me and my.


.02
I do have plants. Several amazon swords, a bunch of ludwigia, and tons of crypts. Plus duckweed. My stocking is also quite low, with only 5 kuhli loaches and 4 Harelquin rasboras in a 35g tank.
My nitrates have been between 5-10ppm for as long as I can remember (those colors can be really difficult to distinguish)
jentralala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 12:45 PM   #24
JDM
 
JDM's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jentralala View Post
I do have plants. Several amazon swords, a bunch of ludwigia, and tons of crypts. Plus duckweed. My stocking is also quite low, with only 5 kuhli loaches and 4 Harelquin rasboras in a 35g tank.
My nitrates have been between 5-10ppm for as long as I can remember (those colors can be really difficult to distinguish)
I suspect that the duckweed is a pretty good nitrate sink.

You should see if you can get some pics into your aquarium log sometime.

Jeff.
JDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 12:49 PM   #25
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jentralala View Post
I do have plants. Several amazon swords, a bunch of ludwigia, and tons of crypts. Plus duckweed. My stocking is also quite low, with only 5 kuhli loaches and 4 Harelquin rasboras in a 35g tank.
My nitrates have been between 5-10ppm for as long as I can remember (those colors can be really difficult to distinguish)

that's good.

With the exception of the duckweed those plants from what I hear are slow growers. Perhaps as they grow out you will notice nitrates dropping even lower.

I am absolutely sure that without the plants your nitrates would be much higher then the 10ppm from your replacement water.

And actually some low level of nitrates can be a good thing with plants. The plants could be consuming ammonia directly which is a good thing. As the aerobic bacterial build up the plants start consuming nitrates for nitrogen.


my .02
beaslbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 01:26 PM   #26
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDM View Post
Hmmm.... maybe regular water changes might help to keep whatever is building up in your tanks low enough to not promote cyano?


Couldn't resist.

Jeff.
It is a proven fact that increasing water changes will work to eliminate cyanobacteria. Cyano occurs from organics, period. So reducing the organics is how to combat it. And there are organics in the water column. This is why you get bacterial blooms in new tanks; the organics in the tap water feed the bacteria. In an aquarium, organics will continue to increase in the water naturally. The more fish, the more organics. These are used by plants, but only up to the point at which some factor limits further photosynthesis.

This is again part of the reason that those few sources that advocate fewer water changes also qualify that by saying the fish load must be kept moderate (= lower than most of us would prefer).

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 02:06 PM   #27
 
jentralala's Avatar
 
Perhaps the nitrates are why I'm seeing such great growth in my swords, I'm getting at least a full grown leaf a week if not more.

I have pics of my setup in my thread, but haven't gotten around to the aquarium log. I should probably do that sometime.
jentralala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 02:37 PM   #28
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
It is a proven fact that increasing water changes will work to eliminate cyanobacteria. Cyano occurs from organics, period. So reducing the organics is how to combat it. And there are organics in the water column. This is why you get bacterial blooms in new tanks; the organics in the tap water feed the bacteria. In an aquarium, organics will continue to increase in the water naturally. The more fish, the more organics. These are used by plants, but only up to the point at which some factor limits further photosynthesis.

This is again part of the reason that those few sources that advocate fewer water changes also qualify that by saying the fish load must be kept moderate (= lower than most of us would prefer).

Byron.

Gee

wonder why I don't have cyano problems.

But then both nitrates and phosphates are unmeasureable (phosphates--salifert low reading kit) in both my marine and Fw tanks.

Even with extremely heavy fish loads.

Guess I'm just wierd.


at .02 as always
beaslbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 02:40 PM   #29
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jentralala View Post
Perhaps the nitrates are why I'm seeing such great growth in my swords, I'm getting at least a full grown leaf a week if not more.

I have pics of my setup in my thread, but haven't gotten around to the aquarium log. I should probably do that sometime.

+1

at some point your plants may become nitrate starved hence the cyano bloom because cyano can fix nitrogen gas. At that point is it possible the cyano is taking phosphates from the plants. And the tank may in fact become cyano dominated vrs plant dominated.

What I do at that point is kill the lights to kill off the cyano and rebalance the tank for the plants.

But still just my .02
beaslbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2013, 05:24 PM   #30
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
Gee

wonder why I don't have cyano problems.

But then both nitrates and phosphates are unmeasureable (phosphates--salifert low reading kit) in both my marine and Fw tanks.

Even with extremely heavy fish loads.

Guess I'm just wierd.
I didn't say that not doing water changes will cause cyano; I merely said that one suggested remedy if you have it is to increase water changes because increasing water changes will reduce organics so logically this should help if cyano is present.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
water in your CO2 regulator? (AKA where to put a check valve?) SilersAngryMeow Beginner Planted Aquarium 3 04-16-2010 01:29 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:54 AM.