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Springtime water check!

This is a discussion on Springtime water check! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 I tested my tap water and it has 1ppm of ammonia in it . What can I actually ...

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Springtime water check!
Old 03-18-2013, 06:56 PM   #11
 
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I tested my tap water and it has 1ppm of ammonia in it . What can I actually do? Perform smalled water changes? Add ammonia remover? I found a bottle of prime sitting around, if anyone is familiar with it can they tell me if it is the standard coverts to ammonium method? Thanks!
This is not so bad. With live plants the ammonia/ammonium will get taken up fairly easily. And even the bacteria will take it up. The only real issue is the initial influx at the water change. And for this, use a conditioner that detoxifies ammonia. Prime does, though you can use other conditioners too provided they say they deal with ammonia. This detoxifies the ammonia in the tap water, changing it to ammonium which is harmless, and the plants/bacteria will take up this additional ammonium by the time the conditioner becomes ineffective (24-48 hours usually).

Byron.
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Old 03-18-2013, 07:15 PM   #12
 
Chiming in to say that Spring or Not it is always possible for the source water to flux if you rely on tap water. Treatment plants that treat water have limitations in what they can treat/filter out, and can have issues with maintaining water quality. This can happen especially in areas that are wet/warm/really hot. You can get blooms within the water treatment plant themselves that lead to your tap water being different than what you are used to.

Recently we've had warmer weather, our trees are blooming sooner, and the weather is becoming quite wet. Lots of people are out working on their yards, and I'm seeing those (insert words that describe my hatred of this practice) chem lawn people out dosing lawns to make them unnaturally green.

Did a water change recently on one of my tanks, and my fish completely freaked out. I had loaches having seizures, shrimp going crazy, and my rasbora became quite stressed. Adding more prime seemed to fix the problem well enough. So now I have to up my Prime until I can test my source water and see what is going on.
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Old 03-18-2013, 08:29 PM   #13
 
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Springtime 'tis the season for algal blooms in surface reservoirs (caused by seasonal overturn of lake nutrients and, perhaps, aggravated by over-applied lawn products used by non-professionals?).
Water companies using surface water, at least those in the southeastern US, often add "extra" chlorine/chloramines this time of year to compensate for the additional algae load. This may, or may not be, announced. My local water system announces it over the radio (a single, solitary announcement on one day cautioning those sensitive to chlorine and those with aquaria - I'm lucky I even caught the announcement the one time I did).

Water systems may super-chlorinate at any time of the year, but typically do so after heavy rains, during algae blooms, and/or when a pipe repair has taken place.
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:33 PM   #14
 
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Urg. I always wondered why my tank had nitrates of 10ppm all the time, finally had a d'oh! moment and checked my tap. 10ppm nitrate -____-

Should I be doing anything special to 'fix' the problem? I've heard people using products to help lower nitrates but I'm leery about adding anything like that to my tank.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:52 PM   #15
 
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Urg. I always wondered why my tank had nitrates of 10ppm all the time, finally had a d'oh! moment and checked my tap. 10ppm nitrate -____-

Should I be doing anything special to 'fix' the problem? I've heard people using products to help lower nitrates but I'm leery about adding anything like that to my tank.
You are good. 10 is reasonable. We want to stay 20 and under. If you see anything above 20 then do a water change or 2.
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:24 PM   #16
 
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Thank you! :)
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:49 AM   #17
 
good reminder.

thanks

mayby some year I'll do it.

(pssst I don't do water changes so I don't worry. LOL)

my .02
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:38 PM   #18
 
Ok i'll just use the prime, thanks!

Now just to figure out what to do with about 230ml of my other water conditioner...
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:51 AM   #19
 
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Urg. I always wondered why my tank had nitrates of 10ppm all the time, finally had a d'oh! moment and checked my tap. 10ppm nitrate -____-

Should I be doing anything special to 'fix' the problem? I've heard people using products to help lower nitrates but I'm leery about adding anything like that to my tank.

FWIW, IME, IMHO and so on.

The following statement is absolutely true.

The only reason you have measurable nitrates (or ammonia, or nitrites, or phosphates, or anything) is because your tank is not reducing those as they are being added or created.

Whether or not that results in a course of action is a completely seperate question.

In my case I just use plant life (Fw plants, marine algae) to achieve unmeasureable nitrates.

But that's just me and my.


.02
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Old 03-20-2013, 09:13 AM   #20
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...

In my case I just use plant life (Fw plants, marine algae) to achieve unmeasureable nitrates.

But that's just me and my.


.02
It works. I still change water each week (most weeks) but even after a three week stretch the nitrates did not cross 5ppm. I'm not certain which plants are responsible as I have 16 varieties now... but that's just details. Of course a lot of this has to do with the plants taking up the ammonia in the first place so it does not go through the bacterial nitrification process and the little bit that does does not produce enough nitrates to be concerned about.

I do expect that, at some point, I will see zero nitrates without changing water.. but it's not my goal, just an interesting side bar.

Jeff.
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