Springtime water check!
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Springtime water check!

This is a discussion on Springtime water check! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Just a note to remind everyone that tap water flux is very common this time of year with all of the rain - and ...

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Springtime water check!
Old 03-16-2013, 04:02 PM   #1
 
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Arrow Springtime water check!

Just a note to remind everyone that tap water flux is very common this time of year with all of the rain - and the ferts that people like to dump in their gardens. . . at least where I live! Always a good idea to keep an eye on the parameters in your tap water - especially in the springtime!
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Old 03-17-2013, 09:08 AM   #2
 
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good idea, however the ferts that are put into gardens usually dont runoff anywhere but are held in the soil. usually the onlytime you see anyrun off is when they are spilled on the sidewalk, applied to a slope or not cleaned the overspill after a application. still very valid suggestion ^^
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Old 03-17-2013, 09:34 AM   #3
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Quote:
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good idea, however the ferts that are put into gardens usually dont runoff anywhere but are held in the soil. usually the onlytime you see anyrun off is when they are spilled on the sidewalk, applied to a slope or not cleaned the overspill after a application. still very valid suggestion ^^
Do you not get rain in Ohio?

Fertilized lawns + rain = runoff

Gardens aren't the issue, it's the lawns. Of course outlying farming areas are huge culprits for getting ferts into the aquifer. Shallow wells, city river water collection... it all adds up. I'm glad that I am on a deep well and our water doesn't change much.

Jeff.
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Old 03-17-2013, 10:46 AM   #4
 
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We live in the country but have a pump house for our area that is treate, this year we still have snow we had tons in February. Llast year at this time we were in t shirts, had the craziest winters lately
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:25 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDM View Post
Do you not get rain in Ohio?

Fertilized lawns + rain = runoff

Gardens aren't the issue, it's the lawns. Of course outlying farming areas are huge culprits for getting ferts into the aquifer. Shallow wells, city river water collection... it all adds up. I'm glad that I am on a deep well and our water doesn't change much.

Jeff.
ill take your srcasim as a joke, i came from the green industry (lawn ferting and weed control etc) the only way you get runoff is when products are applied to a slope or not cleaned off the walks/drives or off target application to hard surfaces. the soil retains the nutrients that are applied to it.
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:34 AM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDM View Post
Do you not get rain in Ohio?

Fertilized lawns + rain = runoff

Gardens aren't the issue, it's the lawns. Of course outlying farming areas are huge culprits for getting ferts into the aquifer. Shallow wells, city river water collection... it all adds up. I'm glad that I am on a deep well and our water doesn't change much.

Jeff.

Lawns and industrial farming are major contributors but gardens still can be a source of water pollution as nitrogen readily leaches through soils (including clay) into the water table. In my area, an urban setting, phosphorous pollution is the most likely to be introduced into the waterways by overspraying on to concrete. The clay soils that make up this area will readily bind fertilizer phosphorous preventing it from leaching into the waterways.
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:52 AM   #7
 
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*shrugs* All I know is that in the spring I will often start seeing nitrates in my water that weren't there before. After periods of particularly heavy rainfall, I've even caught ammonia in my tap . . . generally my tap water is perfection, with no contaminates that I can detect. . . Caught me off-guard last year - not gonna happen again! Can't hurt to do an extra test or three on your tap water - just to keep the babies safe, neh?
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Old 03-17-2013, 01:27 PM   #8
 
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The advice was well given (thanks Chesherca), and should be considered by most of us. It depends where you live obviously, as the source water may or may not be affected by various things. And water can change seasonally.

Here in Vancouver our water comes from three huge lake reservoirs up in the Coast Mountains. When it rains very heavy as it does in the Spring and Autumn particularly, we can see more sediment in the water. This in itself is not harmful. But in some areas of the continent, the water authority might have different sources and switch from one to another at such times, and parameters can change accordingly. Or various substances might be added at such times to deal with issues.

Another possible issue can be increased treatment for bacteria. Additional chlorine, adding chloramine, etc., is sometimes used sporadically. Always using a good water conditioner protects against this, as published notices may not been seen in time.

Unless you have a track record over many years to go by, one shouldn't assume the water coming out of the tap will always be the same.

Byron.
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Old 03-17-2013, 02:20 PM   #9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyMitch View Post
ill take your srcasim as a joke, i came from the green industry (lawn ferting and weed control etc) the only way you get runoff is when products are applied to a slope or not cleaned off the walks/drives or off target application to hard surfaces. the soil retains the nutrients that are applied to it.
Actually fertilizers and pesticides most certainly do run off and leach into water systems. I have 60-80ppm Nitrates in my well water the result of a 95 acre farmers field across the road that gets ample amounts of organic and chemical ferts.
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Old 03-18-2013, 06:14 PM   #10
 
I tested my tap water and it has 1ppm of ammonia in it . What can I actually do? Perform smalled water changes? Add ammonia remover? I found a bottle of prime sitting around, if anyone is familiar with it can they tell me if it is the standard coverts to ammonium method? Thanks!
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