SO SICK of this recurring algae! - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 20 Old 03-25-2012, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by etanico View Post
I'm on day three of the blackout, and I've got a question about what comes after I'm done.
While this blackout could potentially sole my algae problem right now, isn't it possible that the green crap will just return like it has every other time? In other words, after I destroy it...how can I prevent it?
Yes, if the cause is not resolved, it will return. This was covered in the thread linked in my earlier post.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #12 of 20 Old 03-25-2012, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks so much, I went back and read each of the posts. I noticed that you said something about how adding plants could potentially help? Is that a possibility, do you think? I have plenty of room, I think. Also: you seem to be very well-informed. Everywhere says that my plant should be getting about 10 hours of light per day. Is this accurate or can I cut down on that?
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post #13 of 20 Old 03-26-2012, 11:54 AM
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Thanks so much, I went back and read each of the posts. I noticed that you said something about how adding plants could potentially help? Is that a possibility, do you think? I have plenty of room, I think. Also: you seem to be very well-informed. Everywhere says that my plant should be getting about 10 hours of light per day. Is this accurate or can I cut down on that?
Adding more plants will make it more difficult for algae to increase because the more plants there are the faster they grab the nutrients and use the light; fast growing plants and especially floating plants do this best. It is when light continues and one or more nutrients are no longer available that algae can increase because the plants can no longer utilize the light.

So light is the limiting factor, or should be. Which brings us to your second question. Plants can manage with as little as six hours of good light per day. If everything is available, they will photosynthesize provided the light is present. As soon as something is missing, they slow and may even stop. It is all about balance. Saying plants need "x" hours of light is rather meaningless, because the nutrients have to be available and provided they are, whatever the light period, plants will photosynthesize until something is no longer available.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #14 of 20 Old 03-26-2012, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
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Alright, cool. I think I'm gonna try to see how buying a Moneywort will affect the tank. I'm about to go check things out now that it's been four days of blackout.
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post #15 of 20 Old 03-26-2012, 08:52 PM Thread Starter
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Byron (and everyone else who's helping me out). I've decided to proceed with the following. If something is going to be detrimental or harmful to the fish, please let me know as soon as possible.

A complete tank overhaul. I'll put my fish in temporary jars/vases/gallon-sized tanks as I empty about 95% of the water. During the process, I'll thoroughly vacuum out the gravel until it looks new. I'll clean up the plant (scraping away black mold). I'm going to remove my artificial plant. I'll readjust the position of my Amazon sword. Then, I'll stick ONE Moneywort plant towards the back of the tank. I'll refill the tank with conditioned water. I'll give it about an hour to reach the appropriate temperature, with the filter running. I'll decrease the amount of light to 7 hours per day. Then, I'll give the fish time to adjust to the water temperature, and then release them to their "new" tank.

Objections? Advice?
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post #16 of 20 Old 03-27-2012, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by etanico View Post
Byron (and everyone else who's helping me out). I've decided to proceed with the following. If something is going to be detrimental or harmful to the fish, please let me know as soon as possible.

A complete tank overhaul. I'll put my fish in temporary jars/vases/gallon-sized tanks as I empty about 95% of the water. During the process, I'll thoroughly vacuum out the gravel until it looks new. I'll clean up the plant (scraping away black mold). I'm going to remove my artificial plant. I'll readjust the position of my Amazon sword. Then, I'll stick ONE Moneywort plant towards the back of the tank. I'll refill the tank with conditioned water. I'll give it about an hour to reach the appropriate temperature, with the filter running. I'll decrease the amount of light to 7 hours per day. Then, I'll give the fish time to adjust to the water temperature, and then release them to their "new" tank.

Objections? Advice?
If this is solely intended to get rid of the algae issue, I would take a second look. All that is needed is to restore the tank's balance between light and organics. With only one live plant previously, all the natural organics (fish waste primarily) was not being used so some form of algae will usually appear and take advantage. Getting more plants, especially fast growing plants, is probably the better solution.

When a tank is torn down and re-started, just like a new tank, it is more unstable and algae will frequently take advantage again. Rather than risk this, and the stress on the fish, I would simply correct the balance, by adding more plants. Floating plants are ideal for this, as they get lots of light, CO2 from the air, and thus assimilate a lot of nutrients from the water column. Plus they release a lot of oxygen into the water through their roots.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 20 Old 03-27-2012, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
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So scratch all that. I'll head to Petsmart and get some Moneywort AND a floating plant...maybe? Then I'll vacuum out the gravel until about 50% of the water is gone, scrub off some algae and then I'll stick the plant(s) in, and put new water in?
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post #18 of 20 Old 03-27-2012, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by etanico View Post
So scratch all that. I'll head to Petsmart and get some Moneywort AND a floating plant...maybe? Then I'll vacuum out the gravel until about 50% of the water is gone, scrub off some algae and then I'll stick the plant(s) in, and put new water in?
Sounds good. Lots of floating plants, which can be even stem plants that do well floating.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #19 of 20 Old 03-27-2012, 04:57 PM Thread Starter
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Well my local pet stores don't carry Moneywort, but Corkscrew Vallisneria is a new one I'm looking at. I think I'm gonna go hard on this planted tank thing. So I'll get a Corkscrew or two, and then I might get some Pennywort or something. Do you have any suggestions for floating plants? I'm having a hard time finding some.
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post #20 of 20 Old 03-27-2012, 05:46 PM
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Well my local pet stores don't carry Moneywort, but Corkscrew Vallisneria is a new one I'm looking at. I think I'm gonna go hard on this planted tank thing. So I'll get a Corkscrew or two, and then I might get some Pennywort or something. Do you have any suggestions for floating plants? I'm having a hard time finding some.
Water Sprite is my favourite. If you can't get it (it is rare to find it seems), post a request for anyone local to you (where you live) who might either know of a store or be able to send you some. Brazilian Pennywort grows well floating. Other stem plants that do are Green Cabomba, and maybe Wisteria (this is iffy sometimes).

Corkscrew Vall is nice. They may sell it in a small bunch. Once settled, it sends out runners and spreads fairly quickly.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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