Should I rescue this pleco?
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Should I rescue this pleco?

This is a discussion on Should I rescue this pleco? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> I have 67g tank measuring 48x18x18. I came across a post on our local classified ads from someone who has an 8" common pleco ...

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Should I rescue this pleco?
Old 10-16-2011, 04:53 PM   #1
 
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Should I rescue this pleco?

I have 67g tank measuring 48x18x18. I came across a post on our local classified ads from someone who has an 8" common pleco in a 10g. It breaks my heart thinking of the poor guy and i would like to take him... But will he be ok in my tank?

It is a planted tank with an eheim 2213 filter and pool filter sand substrate. Tankmates would be:

15 harlequin rasbora
1 adult platy
5 or more platy fry
1 german blue ram
2 dalmatian mollies
1 juvenile guppy
5 yoyo loaches
5 zebra loaches
1 bristlenose pleco
1 male betta
2 dwarf honey gouramis
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Old 10-16-2011, 04:58 PM   #2
 
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I would definitely rescue him, but you need to find out and I am not the person or that. I reccomend using AqAdvisor.
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Old 10-16-2011, 05:03 PM   #3
 
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AqAdvisor says i am already overstocked, but i always think their recommendations are overly cautious, and don't account for plants.
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Old 10-16-2011, 06:18 PM   #4
 
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While one is tempted to "rescue" this pleco, the fact is that you would be acquiring some very real risk for your existing fish. And you would likely live to seriously regret it.

A fish that is so obviously not well cared for, in such a small environment, is almost guaranteed to have health problems. The immune system has been severely weakened by the stress, and such fish are often overly aggressive. Aggression is a fish's only way of lashing out when it is under such stress. In the current tank, it is basically just sitting there as it has no other recourse. But move it into more spacious surroundings, and it might well display aggression, especially toward the loaches which it will view as invaders to its territory. Pleco are very territorial fish, and beyond this during the night could well eat anything smaller.

To avoid possibly destroying (literally) your existing community, I would not add such a fish.

Byron.
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Old 10-16-2011, 07:08 PM   #5
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
While one is tempted to "rescue" this pleco, the fact is that you would be acquiring some very real risk for your existing fish. And you would likely live to seriously regret it.

A fish that is so obviously not well cared for, in such a small environment, is almost guaranteed to have health problems. The immune system has been severely weakened by the stress, and such fish are often overly aggressive. Aggression is a fish's only way of lashing out when it is under such stress. In the current tank, it is basically just sitting there as it has no other recourse. But move it into more spacious surroundings, and it might well display aggression, especially toward the loaches which it will view as invaders to its territory. Pleco are very territorial fish, and beyond this during the night could well eat anything smaller.

To avoid possibly destroying (literally) your existing community, I would not add such a fish.

Byron.
Are you an Ickthyologist?
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Old 10-16-2011, 07:26 PM   #6
 
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Are you an Ickthyologist?
I don't have biology degrees after my name, but I have done and continue to do considerable research on fish species and habitats. One can learn a great deal even though an amateur and not professional--sadly, the amateur doesn't get paid.

It's ichthyologist, by the way. From the Greek ichthys or ichthus [the Koine or ancient classical Greek for fish] and logos [word].
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Old 10-16-2011, 08:25 PM   #7
 
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I don't have biology degrees after my name, but I have done and continue to do considerable research on fish species and habitats. One can learn a great deal even though an amateur and not professional--sadly, the amateur doesn't get paid.

It's ichthyologist, by the way. From the Greek ichthys or ichthus [the Koine or ancient classical Greek for fish] and logos [word].
oops, my bad.

I'm not sure one can keep fish healthy without doing research.
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Old 10-16-2011, 08:33 PM   #8
 
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Personally, I think you should get it. You can later try to rehome him and take the time to find a person with a huge tank etc, if you chose not to keep him, but the poor thing may end up going to someone else who will put him in a 30 gal or smaller.

Gwen
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Old 10-16-2011, 11:41 PM   #9
 
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I'm not going to get it. As much as my soft heart wants to do it, I will not jeopardize the fish I've already got by risking the scenario Byron described. 39 little fish are worth more to me than saving one large fish, no matter how mistreated the poor thing is.

I might, however, speak to a fish keeping co-worker tomorrow... Before I do, though, i can describe his tank to see if I should bother talking to him...

55g, aquaclear 70 (i think), rena canister filter... I don't know the size but I know it is rated for a larger tank than 55g. Inhabitants are 4-5 jack dempseys, maybe 7 convicts, a pictus catfish, and he also has a couple algae eaters... I want to say one is a siamese algae eater and some sort of pleco... But I'm not sure. there is a large piece of driftwood, a y-shaped piece of PVC pipe, and some large shells, some of which are leaned up against the tank walls to provide hiding spots.

If i were to hazard a guess based on what Byron posted in this thread, and what I read in the profile for plecos, I'm thinking this tank also would not be suitable due to the presence of the other two algae eaters? Any thoughts?
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Old 10-17-2011, 06:43 AM   #10
 
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Byron does have good points on this, and playing it safe would be best. To bad you don't have a way to keep him in a seperate tank, until you know he's healthy. Asking another person you know, will just be putting their tank at risk, unless he/she has a QT. You may just have to hope that the person trying to place it, knows it is too large for their tank, and will be finding it a suitable home. If they didn't care at all, they'd do nothing, and wait till it died. That's the upside :)

Gwen
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