Should I add bacteria? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 23 Old 05-09-2013, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I wouldn't expect Stability to somehow lower nitrates; in fact, quite the opposite if anything.

Are the nitrates in your source water? Or solely from the aquarium itself?
Seachem disagrees. Although I've yet to prove them right, they claim that Stability in conjunction with De*Nitrate, Matrix or Pond Matrix will culture the anaerobic bacteria that will oxidize nitrate into nitrogen gas.
As you well know, the average aquarium is way to aerobic for the easy proliferation of anaerobic bacteria. Perhaps to some degree under decor or in deep sand, but not what we'd term typical. The media's macro/micro pores is supposed to create anaerobic regions. I can buy it in theory, but not for the lack of trying, I can't provide any testimony.

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Last edited by AbbeysDad; 05-10-2013 at 07:42 AM.
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post #12 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 08:47 AM
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+1

Additionally nitrates of 10-20ppm are almost normal and expected in a new planted tank. What I happening is the plants are using ammonia to get nitrogen and forgoing nitrates.

Then as the aerobic bacteria build up and consume the ammonia, the nitrates drop down. Usually tanks 3 weeks or so.

My advice is not to worry about nitrates, don't add anything, and stop doing the water changes.

But that's just my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #13 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
Seachem disagrees. Although I've yet to prove them right, they claim that Stability in conjunction with De*Nitrate, Matrix or Pond Matrix will culture the anaerobic bacteria that will oxidize nitrate into nitrogen gas.
As you well know, the average aquarium is way to aerobic for the easy proliferation of anaerobic bacteria. Perhaps to some degree under decor or in deep sand, but not what we'd term typical. The media's macro/micro pores is supposed to create anaerobic regions. I can buy it in theory, but not for the lack of trying, I can't provide any testimony.

Then I definately recomend against it!!!!!!!

And most especially in a planted tank when ammonia is consumed while consuming carbon dioxide and increasing oxygen.

the exact opposite of growing low oxygen bacteria.

still just my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #14 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 09:06 AM Thread Starter
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Which other test kits do you mean?
I mean the ones that test for free ammonia vs just ammonia in general
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post #15 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 09:57 AM
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I mean the ones that test for free ammonia vs just ammonia in general
I personally would not waste money on expensive tests you really don't need. I never test for ammonia or nitrite, haven't for years, except when something clearly is wrong (fish sick/dying) I do check water conditions as a first step. But aside from this, once a tank is established, and if proper aquarium husbandry is being done, you will not have issues with the nitrogen cycle.
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Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #16 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
Seachem disagrees. Although I've yet to prove them right, they claim that Stability in conjunction with De*Nitrate, Matrix or Pond Matrix will culture the anaerobic bacteria that will oxidize nitrate into nitrogen gas.
As you well know, the average aquarium is way to aerobic for the easy proliferation of anaerobic bacteria. Perhaps to some degree under decor or in deep sand, but not what we'd term typical. The media's macro/micro pores is supposed to create anaerobic regions. I can buy it in theory, but not for the lack of trying, I can't provide any testimony.
This may well be, I've no idea. My initial thinking was that bacterial supplements are adding bacteria to quicken the Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira establishment, and the third stage in the nitrification cycle is nitrates, so one might logically assume nitrate would result. Adding further products to deal with this is another step.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 05:23 PM
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So far as I know, stability advertises anaerobic denitrifyers.

Byron; As mentioned previously, my tap water is zero nitrates.

BEALS; I only wish but who needs to test nitrates when they have discus? They show it by their mood and if I don't change water they won't eat. My tank was set up in december.
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post #18 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 05:28 PM
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Then I definately recomend against it!!!!!!!

And most especially in a planted tank when ammonia is consumed while consuming carbon dioxide and increasing oxygen.

the exact opposite of growing low oxygen bacteria.

still just my .02
B; this will only denitrify excess n and not rob plants of nutrients. To the contrary, these are the microbes which work in the rhyzoshere and enhance n uptake.
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post #19 of 23 Old 05-10-2013, 07:34 PM
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This may well be, I've no idea. My initial thinking was that bacterial supplements are adding bacteria to quicken the Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira establishment, and the third stage in the nitrification cycle is nitrates, so one might logically assume nitrate would result. Adding further products to deal with this is another step.
Seachem Stability:

"The bacteria strains in Stability® have been in development for over a decade. The necessary conditions for growth of our bacterial strains encompass a very broad range. When other bacteria begin to die off (usually from high organic loads caused by the undetected death of an organism), Stability® simply works harder and grows faster! The strains function in fresh or saltwater. Stability® contains both nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria, a blend found in no other product. Additionally, Stability® contains facultative bacterial strains which are able to adapt to either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The bacteria in Stability® are non-sulfur fixing, another innovation in the industry. Most other bacterial supplements will form toxic hydrogen sulfide under the proper conditions. Stability® will not, ever."

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post #20 of 23 Old 05-11-2013, 12:15 PM
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They have likely put some PNSBs in the mix, which can remain in spore form in a bottle for extended periods. I use these bacteria in fermentaions for use on soil. Too bad I'm such a sad case at getting them to establish in my tank.
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