Sarting Our75 Gallon
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Sarting Our75 Gallon

Sarting Our75 Gallon

This is a discussion on Sarting Our75 Gallon within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Here is our 75 gallon: We spent $175 cash to get it. I haggled the guy down from $250. Well, a year later and ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Golden Pencilfish
Golden Pencilfish
Bloodfin Tetra
Bloodfin Tetra
Reply
Old 02-16-2012, 11:02 PM   #1
 
FishyParents's Avatar
 
Sarting Our75 Gallon

Here is our 75 gallon:

We spent $175 cash to get it. I haggled the guy down from $250. Well, a year later and still no full hood. Mid-April we'll be moving into a new place and hubs promises that I can finally get it up and running. xD
So I think we've settled on South American Cichlids with POSSIBLY some live plants. I'm also thinking about giving sand a try. Get rid of this "already dirty but hasn't been used" black gravel. The media inside the filter has already been used. But I'm not sure how long as they look pretty clean.

Any tips on starting my tank? Would a "kick start" kit be okay, or should I not use it? Should tank be cycling 24 or 48 hours? Any other tips will be greatly appreciated. BTW, this is the cheapest full hood I could find:
Fluorescent Aquarium Lighting: Marineland Fluorescent Aquarium Hoods If ANYONE finds one cheaper please let me know.
Thanks in advanced! :)
FishyParents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2012, 11:47 PM   #2
 
MinaMinaMina's Avatar
 
That's so exciting for you, that you'll finally be able to set up your tank. And very exciting, too, that its a 75g. That's a great size, and you'll have plenty of choices!

A tank will not cycle in 24-48 hours. You can read more here: http://http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-articles/bacteria-freshwater-aquarium-74891/
It won't matter, for the purpose of cycling, whether your substrate or filter material has been used or not, because its dried out and any beneficial bacteria will be long dead. You can seed from another, HEALTHY tank if the seed is kept wet in tank water, not expose to untreated water, and transported with in a short amount of time.
You may want to reconsider your choice on having plants. A heavily planted tank is beautiful, natural, great for the fish in many ways, and reduce or remove cycling hassles. We can help you figure out what kind of lighting to get, and what types of plants to get.
In the aticle above, take note of the different methods of "fish-less cycling", as these are the most humane. In this day and age, there's really no excuse for "fish in" cycling.
Before you decide on a type of fish or geographical area (which is a great idea, but let's back up for a moment), what are your water parameters (pH, hardness)? You can test your pH out of the tap and after having sit out for 24 hours with a testing kit. (You should get an API Master Kit, anyway, you'll need it later). The hardness (look for GH, KH) of you water can be found by either looking at your city's water works website, or by calling them. Knowing those numbers, we can see what species would like your water.

And, most importantly... WELCOME TO TFK!
MinaMinaMina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 01:17 AM   #3
 
FishyParents's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinaMinaMina View Post
That's so exciting for you, that you'll finally be able to set up your tank. And very exciting, too, that its a 75g. That's a great size, and you'll have plenty of choices!

A tank will not cycle in 24-48 hours. You can read more here: http://http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/freshwater-articles/bacteria-freshwater-aquarium-74891/
It won't matter, for the purpose of cycling, whether your substrate or filter material has been used or not, because its dried out and any beneficial bacteria will be long dead. You can seed from another, HEALTHY tank if the seed is kept wet in tank water, not expose to untreated water, and transported with in a short amount of time.
You may want to reconsider your choice on having plants. A heavily planted tank is beautiful, natural, great for the fish in many ways, and reduce or remove cycling hassles. We can help you figure out what kind of lighting to get, and what types of plants to get.
In the aticle above, take note of the different methods of "fish-less cycling", as these are the most humane. In this day and age, there's really no excuse for "fish in" cycling.
Before you decide on a type of fish or geographical area (which is a great idea, but let's back up for a moment), what are your water parameters (pH, hardness)? You can test your pH out of the tap and after having sit out for 24 hours with a testing kit. (You should get an API Master Kit, anyway, you'll need it later). The hardness (look for GH, KH) of you water can be found by either looking at your city's water works website, or by calling them. Knowing those numbers, we can see what species would like your water.

And, most importantly... WELCOME TO TFK!
I really would like to use live plants. Would the plants do better in sand or gravel? How long would my tank need to cycle? Which fertilizer do you recommend for the plants? I was thinking on getting one of these: Seachem™ Flourish Tabs™ - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart Seachem Flourish Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart Is this needed for the plants? Aqueon Aquarium Plant Food - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart What is Substrate?
The plants I'm considering:
Green Cabomba Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Hornwort Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Anacharis Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Frill Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Moneywort Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Anubius Plants - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Amazon Sword Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Java Fern Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
The taller, bushier plants I'd plant in the back and the smaller larger leafed ones I'd plant more in the front.
I've had fish since I was really young. 1st tank was 2 fan tails that lived for 5 years. 2nd tank had a shubunkin that i rescued from wally world (was terribly sick), 1 fan tail, 2 cories and a pleco. SOMEHOW the fish lived for almost 10 years. Since high school I've been owning betta after betta after betta. Along the while dreaming of the big tank set up.
I really had little to no knowledge of proper tank set up for whatever fish. Still kinda know little to none. But know a bit more. Especially after going through bettas.

I had a pH kit. Ran out of it last week. I am considering purchasing water test kits to do periodically on my own. What test kits would you recommend? Would you recommend stocking on any tablet treatments should my fish contract ick, fungus or other issues?
The Cichlids I am considering are: Jack Dempseys, Black Convicts, Red Devils, and Blood Red Parrots. I don't think I'll be adding all 4 of those breeds. I may also consider just getting some assorted african cichlids. Bottom feeders are FOR SURE going to be 4-6 Corys and possibly a pleco.

Sorry for all my questions BTw, in case you haven't noticed I'll be shopping at PetsMart the most xD
FishyParents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 02:04 AM   #4
 
MinaMinaMina's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FishyParents View Post
I really would like to use live plants. Would the plants do better in sand or gravel? It doesn't matter which one really, just what looks best to you. Play sand is your cheapest option, at about $3 per 50# bad in the US.
How long would my tank need to cycle? Please read the link above. It depends on which method you use. If you chose to plant the tank heavily from the get go, and stock slowly, you may not have to worry about it at all since the plants will suck up the Ammonia from the fish before it has a chance to cause a problem.
Which fertilizer do you recommend for the plants? I was thinking on getting one of these: Seachem™ Flourish Tabs™ - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart Seachem Flourish Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart Is this needed for the plants? Aqueon Aquarium Plant Food - Plant Care - Fish - PetSmart It depends on the plants, but you'll like need a comprehensive liquid fert, like Flourish Comprehensive, for sure. If you have plants that are heavy root feeders, then a root tab is recommended. Of the list below, the only one that would need root tabs is the Amazon Sword. You can use the "Tropical Fish Profiles" tab in the dark blue navigation bar above to research the plants you want. It will tell you what type of water they like, what temp, how big they get (important for placement in area of the tank), etc. If a name is shaded like Scalare Angelfish then you can click on the shaded name to go right to that profile.
You can also use the box at the top right of the page to run a search on any question you may have to see if its been asked/answered before.
What is Substrate? Substrate is the covering on the bottom of your tank. It could be sand, gravel, fluorite, EcoComplete, soil, laterite, or a combination of these, or others. You'll want to stick to either gravel or sand.
The plants I'm considering:
Green Cabomba Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Hornwort Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Anacharis Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Frill Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Moneywort Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Anubius Plants - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Amazon Sword Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
Java Fern Plant - Decorations - Fish - PetSmart
We can't really say anything about how well these plants might work for you, because we don't yet know about your water, and your lighting. But I can tell you to count on adding a floating plant, and Water Sprite is a great one.
The taller, bushier plants I'd plant in the back and the smaller larger leafed ones I'd plant more in the front. You have a good eye for scaping, just make sure that you keep in mind the plant's adult size. The "smaller large leafed" ones may be small now, but perhaps not later.
I've had fish since I was really young. 1st tank was 2 fan tails that lived for 5 years. The normal lifespan of a fantail Goldfish is up to 25 years.
2nd tank had a shubunkin that i rescued from wally world (was terribly sick), 1 fan tail, 2 cories and a pleco. SOMEHOW the fish lived for almost 10 years. Since high school I've been owning betta after betta after betta. Along the while dreaming of the big tank set up.
I really had little to no knowledge of proper tank set up for whatever fish. Still kinda know little to none. But know a bit more. Especially after going through bettas. There are many very knowledgeable people on this site that are here to help!

I had a pH kit. Ran out of it last week. I am considering purchasing water test kits to do periodically on my own. What test kits would you recommend? The API Master Kit is the gold standard. Dip tests are notoriously inaccurate, and the stick-on-the-glass types are, too. The Master Kit is an invaluable tool when starting up a new tank. You'll be testing so you'll know when your Ammonia or Nitrite is over 0ppm (do a 50% water change) or your Nitrates are over 20ppm (do a 50% water change). To repeat, because its vitally important- do a 50% water change any time your Ammonia or Nitrites are over 0ppm, your Nitrates are over 20ppm, or weekly... whichever comes first.
Would you recommend stocking on any tablet treatments should my fish contract ick, fungus or other issues? If you follow the cycle advice in the link, do your water changes as outlined above, employ a QT tank, pick appropriate fish, and don't overstock... you shouldn't have to worry about disease. Medications go bad quickly, anyway, so its a waste of money to buy it ahead of time.
The Cichlids I am considering are: Jack Dempseys, Black Convicts, Red Devils, and Blood Red Parrots. Any and all of these cichlids are very likely to destroy a planted tank in about 3.4 nanoseconds. I don't recommend any of these for a planted tank!
75g is a tight fit for Red Devils.
But before choosing fish, we need to find out about your water parameters.

I don't think I'll be adding all 4 of those breeds. I may also consider just getting some assorted african cichlids. Africans will also destroy a planted tank.
Bottom feeders are FOR SURE going to be 4-6 Corys and possibly a pleco. Corydoras need to be in a group of at least 5 (preferably more). Corydoras species cannot be housed with larger Central America cichlids, or with African cichlids. Besides needing different water parameters, the Corys would be lunch in a second. (And Corys have lockable spines that are likely to get them caught in the bigger fish's mouth or throat, killing both the Cory and the cichlid.) A Common Pleco is more versatile, but if you get one, I would encourage you to get one from someone who bought if for a too-small tank and needs to re-home it. Plenty of people do this, trust me, so ask around and check on local lists (like craigslist.com). Also, click on the shaded name. The Common Pleco needs driftwood in his diet, gets huge, and they only really eat algae when they're young. It may not be the best choice.

Sorry for all my questions BTw, in case you haven't noticed I'll be shopping at PetsMart the most xD If shopping at a large chain like this, I encourage a few things- 1. Get and use a quarantine tank (AKA QT tank or hospital tank). Fish, inverts, and plants more often carry diseases from these chain stores. Its much cheaper in the long run to go with the added expense of a QT tank, than the expense and heartache of disease in your main tank. 2. Ignore any advice the employees give you, and ignore the little blurbs about "needs x number of gallons" or "peaceful" or any of those little blurbs about the fish/inverts/plants. They lie. Come talk to us first. 3. Research any plant before you buy it. They are notorious for selling semi-aquatic plants as fully aquatic. Then they just slowly die. Not cool.
That's all I can think of for now...
MinaMinaMina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 09:59 AM   #5
 
FishyParents's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinaMinaMina View Post
That's all I can think of for now...
I'll definitely be considering getting a water sprite. When looking at it's profile it seems to be a very hardy plant :) I'll purchase an API test kit today when I get the dog's food as well. Why are the test strips commonly inaccurate?

Thank you for the helpful advice :)
FishyParents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 10:27 AM   #6
 
Tazman's Avatar
 
Jack Dempseys, Black Convicts, Red Devils are aggressive and not really what I would recommend looking at getting for someone who is just starting out.

Agreed that a 75g tank is the minimum size for a Red Devil and a single fish at that.

Plants - Anbuias (off hand I cannot remember which species) work with cichlids, there is something in them that doesnt taste too good for them, I have it in both my cichlid tanks and it has never been chewed at or destroyed.
Tazman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 11:10 AM   #7
 
Geomancer's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FishyParents View Post
I'll definitely be considering getting a water sprite. When looking at it's profile it seems to be a very hardy plant :) I'll purchase an API test kit today when I get the dog's food as well. Why are the test strips commonly inaccurate?

Thank you for the helpful advice :)
They absorb moisture from the air over time. I'm sure there are more technical explanations as well on a chemical level.

The API Master Test Kit is $25 off Amazon.com which contains the 4 tests you need (Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, and pH (both high and low).

Buying those individually in strips costs more than that, and gives you fewer tests. Not a good deal anyway you look at it.
Geomancer is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Geomancer For This Useful Post:
MinaMinaMina (02-17-2012)
Old 02-17-2012, 11:20 AM   #8
 
MinaMinaMina's Avatar
 
What Tazman said about Anubias tasting bad is right on. Java fern, too. Both of these can and should be tied to rock or wood. So this makes them a little bit more resistant to a large cichlid's (esp. Central Americans) 'redecorating', they won't be uprooting those plants, but being knocked around is going to take a toll on them. Its usually not worth the effort.
MinaMinaMina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 01:24 PM   #9
 
FishyParents's Avatar
 
I saw this Aquarium salt for Freshwater. I read the container and it said it is to be added after water changes and when treating diseases? Why add salt to FRESHwater? Should it really be added on a regular basis?
FishyParents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2012, 01:37 PM   #10
 
MinaMinaMina's Avatar
 
Wow, that's a can of worms. Many different opinions on that. The short answer is that it depends on the species and situation. Most people here agree that its only possible use in a freshwater system is for treating specific illnesses in specific situations. So, do you need it for regular, daily use? The consensus is "no".
MinaMinaMina is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
pics of 45 gallon community and 10 gallon betta tanks Salix Freshwater Journals 4 12-31-2010 12:12 AM
120 Gallon With Home Made Stand and In Wall 55 Gallon With Drain and Fill Plumbing WTFJayJay DIY Aquarium 2 07-20-2009 03:33 PM
Stocking my 105-gallon display tank and 20 gallon sump fishr4life Saltwater Fish 2 01-27-2008 02:51 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:46 PM.