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Rescue Tank

This is a discussion on Rescue Tank within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> One of my exes, one of the rare ones that I'm still on good terms with anyway, works with a coworker at a pharmacy ...

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Old 05-14-2012, 05:24 PM   #1
 
Rescue Tank

One of my exes, one of the rare ones that I'm still on good terms with anyway, works with a coworker at a pharmacy who was looking to get rid what was SUPPOSEDLY a 40 gallon. She thought of me and asked me if I wanted it. I said sure. Then she mentioned that it had a...

dun dun dun duunnn.. dunn...

Purple Bloody Parrot. I was both shocked and not shocked because I know these guys need at least a 75 Gallon, IMO. A 40 was way too small for one of them. I wasn't shocked because most people don't know better. Then something hit me even harder.

There was also a Pacu.

I will admit that my immediate thought was NOT of a charitable nature for the owner. How could someone put a Bloody Parrot and a Pacu in a 40 gallon? I asked how large they were and she responded that they were the size of my hand. Then I knew what I had to do. I had to take these fish and find them homes. I couldn't give them one myself, but I could make sure they went to someone who knows what they're doing. And I would get a free tank out of it.

So I took it.

What met my eyes when I walked into that home stunned me. The first thing that hit me was this was not a 40 gallon. It was a 30 Gallon or most likely a 29 since it looked exactly like a 20 Long but taller. Then the second thing that hit me was how low the water level was. Apparently my ex had just started emptying the water, but it was already halfway down.

The third thing that floored me even further was the filth. The slime that coated the filter was... at least one inch thick. I couldn't even SEE the fish. It looked like there was nothing in there. My brain kicked into cleanup mode, taking out water into the cooler I had brought then the fish themselves. Next up was the filter media. What met my fingers was nothing but slime. Slime, slime, slime, and more slime. When I pulled out the filter cartridges, over half of the reservoirs was filled with slime. I scrubbed the best I could of the filters in the pitcher they had so kindly provided. Immediately the water was black. Not green, not brown, but black. Deep, dark black. I rinsed them out as much as I could in a limited time since the woman was trying to get out, but I wouldn't take the tank as it was. It had to be at least made manageable. I put the cartridges into a ziploc bag and put it in the cooler with the fish.

Took the tank outside and hosed as much as I could out. The bottom trim cracked. Great. I found the label, "Made by Marineland 1992" at the bottom. Then I packed everything up... except the heater. In the woman's rush to get us out of her house, I had forgotten the heater. I had already left and so had she. I took the tank home and cleaned it up. Hopefully soon the woman will answer me and I can go get the heater.

Here's the dirty tank emptied -




And the god-awful background it came with -




I took my trusty razor blade and went to town on it. It took me a good solid hour and more to clean everything up. By the time I had finally filled the tank up with water and gotten the filter running, I noticed the Pacu was listing, almost lying down. In the cooler -




So I quickly acclimated them in 30 minutes by taking out a cup of water then adding the fresh water in every 15 minutes. The Pacu was getting worse and worse by the minute until I was finally forced to dump the entire cooler, contents and all, into the tank. Both fish floated down to the bottom and didn't move.





The light that came with the tank didn't work. The switch was sticky, so I took one of my other tanks' lights for the photos. Now the water is starting to clear up thanks to the filter. For a bit there, I was worried that this thing, this Monster of the South, was not going to make it. I had forgotten one of the cardinal rules of rescuing fish: Don't do a complete cleanup. Allow them time to become used to a clean tank. This is my first actual rescue, so I had completely forgotten this. Fortunately, both fish seem to have recovered and are swimming around. I've turned the tank light and the room lights off to allow them to become more comfortable.

And so we come to where we are right now. I don't think this is a Red Belly Pacu. I'm not familiar with the different Pacu species, but hopefully someone here can ID this one for me. Once the water clears, I'll take a clearer photo.
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Old 05-14-2012, 05:37 PM   #2
 
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Oh, poor babies!
Hopefully they don't go through clean water shock. I can't believe people hear that they get used to this and then say that the water should never be changed.
He looks like a black pacu to me, the face is stubbier in them. Google image and be horrified at the sizes of those. Bigger species. I don't think anything considered a food fish due to fast growth and large size belongs in anyone's tank.
That "purple" bloody parrot probably was purple at one point- dyed to look that way. The dye has faded clearly and somehow the fish has survived pretty long.

The """"good news"""" (use that term very sarcastically) is that those fish are probably long stunted and will never reach their expected sizes. The parrot might be able to live out his days in the 30 even, depending on how long they've been there. But bigger would still be better.
I'd throw in some fake plants if you have any (to my understanding the cichlid will probably rip up live ones). The pacu really needs a planted tank.. but the cichlid does not, another conflict. Some floating live plants might work, like a hornwort.

Hopefully someone on here can take them.
You can try contacting a local public aquarium if there's one nearby. But most aquariums are really sick of getting tank busters and they may not take him, worth a shot though...
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Old 05-14-2012, 05:40 PM   #3
 
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Yeah, oddly enough going from really bad water to nice clean water causes stress.

Hopefully they make it, sad that people take on pets then don't care for them properly. Then act clueless when someone else points out how terrible their care is.
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Old 05-14-2012, 05:46 PM   #4
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
Oh, poor babies!
Hopefully they don't go through clean water shock. I can't believe people hear that they get used to this and then say that the water should never be changed.
He looks like a black pacu to me, the face is stubbier in them. Google image and be horrified at the sizes of those. Bigger species. I don't think anything considered a food fish due to fast growth and large size belongs in anyone's tank.
That "purple" bloody parrot probably was purple at one point- dyed to look that way. The dye has faded clearly and somehow the fish has survived pretty long.

The """"good news"""" (use that term very sarcastically) is that those fish are probably long stunted and will never reach their expected sizes. The parrot might be able to live out his days in the 30 even, depending on how long they've been there. But bigger would still be better.
I'd throw in some fake plants if you have any (to my understanding the cichlid will probably rip up live ones). The pacu really needs a planted tank.. but the cichlid does not, another conflict. Some floating live plants might work, like a hornwort.

Hopefully someone on here can take them.
You can try contacting a local public aquarium if there's one nearby. But most aquariums are really sick of getting tank busters and they may not take him, worth a shot though...
Thanks! I just hope they survive. I'm surprised the Bloody Parrot has lived this long too. I really hope these guys aren't stunted... but they probably are. That was another of the first thoughts I had about them. I'm going to have to get in touch with the woman and ask how long they've had these fish. :(

I have someone else coming by to drop what they say is a big tank but doesn't know how many gallons it is but it "takes many gallons". Hopefully that one will be larger and I can transfer these fish over to that one to at least give them more room. I need to give the Pacu cover. I think I'll have to take out half of the RCS's Guppy Grass and put it in there to give him at least a semblance of cover.

I'm going to try and contact the local NC Zoos and MonsterFishKeepers to see if anyone is willing to take the Pacu.
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Old 05-14-2012, 05:48 PM   #5
 
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Yea. I was thinking about that the other day.. I figured it's kind of like how if a person is malnourished for a long time, and suddenly they get really rich food it makes them incredibly sick. (was reading about WWII, starting thinking about fish). It doesn't mean that the person should be fed a horrible diet for the rest of their life, it just means you gotta adjust slowly. Just like the fish.

People at monster fish keepers are usually good people. The whole point of the site is to rescue fish like that, so hopefully you'll find someone for them!
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Old 05-14-2012, 06:07 PM   #6
 
where do you live, because i can house the parrot- but i would need the tank...
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Old 05-14-2012, 06:41 PM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Assault0137 View Post
where do you live, because i can house the parrot- but i would need the tank...
I think the parrot needs a bigger tank than this one, actually. I'd feel better if it went to a tank that's at least 75 Gallons and had other Bloody Parrots since they like others of their own kind. It's funny, I think Bloody Parrots are horrible mutations and shouldn't be bred but I can't help but feel sorry for this one.

I added Guppy Grass and a slate rock from my Blue Lobster to give the Pacu somewhere to hide if he wants to. Ironically enough, it's actually the Bloody Parrot who uses it, not the Pacu.

Hopefully I've made their stay here at least somewhat comfortable.







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Old 05-14-2012, 07:08 PM   #8
 
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Yea, cichlids are the cave fish. Pacu seems like he wouldn't really use caves since he's a big schooling fish in nature. :D
That poor parrot is SO washed out looking. :(
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Old 05-14-2012, 07:31 PM   #9
 
Yeah, the BP really is. He almost looks white to me.

I've been discussing with a well-known Pacu keeper and it turns out that this Pacu is actually one of the smaller species of Pacu. It's a C. bidens, which will grow to 15" in aquariums but can get to 30" in the wild. 15" is still a huge fish.

At least maybe there will be more of a chance for him for adoption. I'd like to keep him, but I don't have the space or the funds or the tank required to keep something of that size.
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Old 05-15-2012, 07:02 AM   #10
 
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Originally Posted by ZeeZ View Post
Yeah, the BP really is. He almost looks white to me.

I've been discussing with a well-known Pacu keeper and it turns out that this Pacu is actually one of the smaller species of Pacu. It's a C. bidens, which will grow to 15" in aquariums but can get to 30" in the wild. 15" is still a huge fish.

At least maybe there will be more of a chance for him for adoption. I'd like to keep him, but I don't have the space or the funds or the tank required to keep something of that size.
i created a thread to help out with that problem. http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...7/#post1081885
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