Recommendations 6ft tank
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Recommendations 6ft tank

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Recommendations 6ft tank
Old 04-09-2013, 10:22 PM   #1
 
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Recommendations 6ft tank

Hello All,
just in advance any help would be greatly appreciated.
I am soon purchasing a 6x2x2 fish tank, well, my girlfriend and i have bought a house and the tank has came free with the house (cool huh) haha my question is what would be sufficient filtration for a tank that size? i am not 100% sure of these things.
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Old 04-10-2013, 04:47 AM   #2
 
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I would check to make sure the tank doesn't leak first =X
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Old 04-10-2013, 12:22 PM   #3
 
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I'd go with a canister filter for that size tank. Fluval, Rena, and Eheim are all great brands, and I've also heard good things about Marineland and Sunsun. Just get one rated for your tank size or a little over.
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Old 04-10-2013, 01:13 PM   #4
 
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Fluval doesn't make them that large, except the FX5 but that's overkill.

That tank is ~180 gallons.

My own six foot tank is a 125 gallon, I use the Rena XP3 (now called API Filstar XPL). With live plants you could get away with the same (the limit on the XP3 is 175 gallons) but you may wish to go with the XP4 (now called API Filstar XPXL) which is good up to 265 gallons.

Eheim has the same problem as Fluval, there is a massive gap in ratings. A classic 2217 does 159 gallons and the next classic model, the 2260, is good for 396 gallons! The only one in the ballpark for them is the Professional 3e 2078 which is good up to 185 gallons.

Still not as bad as Fluval though. The largest normal canister they have is the 406 which is only good up to 100 gallons ... then the FX5 monster that is good for 400 gallons. They have NOTHING between 100 and 400 gallons o.O

They just came out with the FX6 too which is also 400 gallons just has more bells and whistles.
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Old 04-10-2013, 03:56 PM   #5
 
I would go with two filters. One would be a dedicated bio-filter (canister) that would rarely require any maintenance and the other would be a dedicated mechanical filter (HOB) with ability for periodic chemical as/if required that would be serviced routinely.
Why?
Biological filtration benefits from slower flow rates and not being disturbed. Increased media capacity also allows us to leverage more advanced bio-filtration.
Mechanical filtration media is best serviced often to prevent trapped detritus from decomposing into dissolved organic compounds (DOCs) that pollute the water.

Although I'm using two HOBs, this is basically what I'm doing on my 60g and it seems very successful.
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Old 04-10-2013, 03:59 PM   #6
 
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just a tidbit, if your going planted run the other direction form HOB's
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Old 04-10-2013, 08:55 PM   #7
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyMitch View Post
just a tidbit, if your going planted run the other direction form HOB's
And canisters too?...Perhaps you should explain further.

Note: the reason I suggested a HOB for mechanical filtration is the ease at which the media can be serviced.

Last edited by AbbeysDad; 04-10-2013 at 09:15 PM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:38 PM   #8
 
Before anyone can give you proper advice we really need to know where you stand with stocking, substrate, lighting, and planting. Doing so gives us an idea of what type of system is best for your future tank.

I can give you some general advice based on my experience with larger tanks, and my 6 foot long 150 gallon.

If you have sand as your substrate you have to question "What will my fish be?". Once you know that ask yourself are these fish that can kick up sand? Bichirs, Rope Fish, Eels, Corydora, Loaches, etc are all fish that hang about the bottom and can uproot plants that are not well rooted, and kick up an enormous amount of sand. Other fish such as Gourami, Rainbowfish, Tetra, Bala Sharks, etc (upper to mid level) are fish that tend to not mess around with the bottom too much.

This is important. If you have fish that kick up sand you want filters that can deal with it. All HOB's and some Canisters pull water through a tube, into the motor, through the media and then back into the tank. This is fine if you don't have sand being kicked up. It is not if you do. So plan accordingly. You can use HOB's in this situation if you cover the intakes with something to filter the sand out and hope it doesn't burn out, and hope you don't end up with a clogged pre-filter while you are out which then burns your motor.

Yes I am hinting at something here. Hint Hint.

Moving on, you must also take plants into consideration. If you want to run a fully planted tank having current is important. Moving those plants around helps fight against algae overtaking the leaves. It also ensures even distribution of nutrients. Fully planted tanks when balanced correctly should not need heavy filtration. You still need current though. That's all I can offer as per advice.

I personally run a 150 gallon tank that is 6 feet long. I run two heaters and two filters. Both filters are Canisters. This works for me. The tank is planted though, with root heavy plants and things grow very well.

EDIT: One other thing. When you have larger tanks going into the 150 range and up there there is always the possibility of layering when it comes to water. This happens when you have heavier water that is loaded with nutrients/organics hanging around the mid to lower range of the tank. The cleaner lighter water sits at the top. This happens when you don't have a system forcing the water to mix or if you have your filters set up so that they are only effectively filtering the mid to top range. I had to fight this at some point until I finally realized was going on. When you set up filtration make sure you are pushing water around properly so you don't face this problem.

Last edited by Sanguinefox; 04-10-2013 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 04-11-2013, 06:58 AM   #9
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguinefox View Post

This is important. If you have fish that kick up sand you want filters that can deal with it. All HOB's and some Canisters pull water through a tube, into the motor, through the media and then back into the tank. This is fine if you don't have sand being kicked up. It is not if you do. So plan accordingly. You can use HOB's in this situation if you cover the intakes with something to filter the sand out and hope it doesn't burn out, and hope you don't end up with a clogged pre-filter while you are out which then burns your motor.
I believe on my XP3 the motor is on the output (so after media).

I'm not certain sand is such an issue with canisters though. I can see it being much more of an issue with HOBs since in a HOB the impeller is at the bottom of the reservoir and thus the sand will settle down there. In all canisters I have seen the impeller is located at the top.
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:14 PM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
And canisters too?...Perhaps you should explain further.

Note: the reason I suggested a HOB for mechanical filtration is the ease at which the media can be serviced.
cans aren't as bad for planted and are just as easy in my opinion to clean as a hob. I can explain in further detail if in fact he plans on going the planted route.
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