Recommend Fish Books?
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Recommend Fish Books?

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Recommend Fish Books?
Old 12-11-2012, 04:45 PM   #1
 
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Recommend Fish Books?

Can anyone recommend some books on fish to me? Christmas is coming and I dont have room to put up any more aquariums so I figure this will be a nice alternative ^u^

Im not looking for basic books like ones that help you pick out stocking and plants, Im hoping to get into more... scientific topics I guess?

Topics like fish behavior in the wild as compared to in the home aquarium, in depth specifics on certain species and possibly some in depth books on inverts would be good, maybe even magazines? Oh and Biotopes would be a fantastic subject as well!


Ive only gotten my information from the internet so its been all over the place and I'm not really sure what I want e.e
Any suggestions would be incredibly appreciated though!
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Old 12-11-2012, 06:23 PM   #2
 
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These days your best source is more likely to be the internet. Books are out of date almost as soon as they are published. And aside from general books on fish species, few are coming out, probably because of the internet. Once you know the reliable sites, it is a mine of information.

Magazine subscriptions however are valuable. Most of these appear monthly (in English anyway) and you can get some valuable info almost as quick as online. And the major magazines have online subscriptions too. If I had someone to ask for this, I would ask for Practical Fishkeeping, perhaps the finest English-language aquarium magazine. Species articles in each issue, written by knowledgeable authors, along with excellent husbandry advice from ichthyologists and biologists. The new Amazonas is right up there too, and this deals much more with specific fish species without any general care and such. Tropical Fish Hobbyist is another.

Byron.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:15 PM   #3
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
These days your best source is more likely to be the internet. Books are out of date almost as soon as they are published. And aside from general books on fish species, few are coming out, probably because of the internet. Once you know the reliable sites, it is a mine of information.

Magazine subscriptions however are valuable. Most of these appear monthly (in English anyway) and you can get some valuable info almost as quick as online. And the major magazines have online subscriptions too. If I had someone to ask for this, I would ask for Practical Fishkeeping, perhaps the finest English-language aquarium magazine. Species articles in each issue, written by knowledgeable authors, along with excellent husbandry advice from ichthyologists and biologists. The new Amazonas is right up there too, and this deals much more with specific fish species without any general care and such. Tropical Fish Hobbyist is another.

Byron.
I suppose thats true, I'll always prefer a book over the internet though.
Would you be able to recommend any sites? Or should I just stick to forums like this one? Goodness knows here is where I've learned just about all I know so far!

Thank you for the magazine info, it looks like Ill be getting the Amazonas and the Tropical Fish Hobbyist for Christmas!
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:23 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by emeraldsky View Post
I suppose thats true, I'll always prefer a book over the internet though.
Would you be able to recommend any sites? Or should I just stick to forums like this one? Goodness knows here is where I've learned just about all I know so far!

Thank you for the magazine info, it looks like Ill be getting the Amazonas and the Tropical Fish Hobbyist for Christmas!
I have always preferred books myself, but over the past three-plus years since I have been active on this site, writing the profiles and articles, I have become more comfortable with using online resources. And as I say, even the latest books can be out of date quickly. Advances are occurring quite rapidly in scientific areas. And another advantage is the cost, most of it is free. As long as you know the source, you're OK.

I have done a lot of research for the fish and plant profiles plus the articles. I have kept the profiles to the basics but if there is anything you are looking for beyond those in the way of habitat and such, just ask. Depending upon the topic, I can easily suggest reliable sites.

Byron.
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Old 12-12-2012, 01:18 PM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I have always preferred books myself, but over the past three-plus years since I have been active on this site, writing the profiles and articles, I have become more comfortable with using online resources. And as I say, even the latest books can be out of date quickly. Advances are occurring quite rapidly in scientific areas. And another advantage is the cost, most of it is free. As long as you know the source, you're OK.

I have done a lot of research for the fish and plant profiles plus the articles. I have kept the profiles to the basics but if there is anything you are looking for beyond those in the way of habitat and such, just ask. Depending upon the topic, I can easily suggest reliable sites.

Byron.


Thank you Byron, I appreciate it very much.

If you can, right now I'm looking into fish behaviors in the wild as opposed to home aquaria and
biotopes since that would be something I would like to do in the future.

Some more in depth info on specific fish breeds would be nice as well, some of the more uncommon ones that arent necessarily available to home aquariums.

Last edited by emeraldsky; 12-12-2012 at 01:27 PM..
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Old 12-12-2012, 01:53 PM   #6
 
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If you can, right now I'm looking into fish behaviors in the wild as opposed to home aquaria and biotopes since that would be something I would like to do in the future.
I'm not sure I understand this precisely. Perhaps with a concrete example?

Quote:
Some more in depth info on specific fish breeds would be nice as well, some of the more uncommon ones that arent necessarily available to home aquariums.
My "first" site is always Seriously Fish's knowledge base. This site is owned by Matt Ford, a professional biologist with considerable experience, and I believe I can call him a friend though we have never met face to face. Matt knows his stuff.

Beyond that, I would have to know the specific species to suggest further, as there are some reliable sites on fish families, like Planet Catfish, Loaches Online, and so forth.

Byron.
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Old 12-12-2012, 02:15 PM   #7
 
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I have to agree with Byron. Books are fast becoming outdated; by the time they hit the publisher, new information on the subjects has already been published. I reference my ichthyology texts from school a lot, but some of the best information I feel is in peer-reviewed journals which are all online.

Most of my "fish books" are actually books describing the history of goldfish breeding and things of that sort. I prefer to find care articles online because our knowledge base is growing so rapidly.

Is there a specific species you are interested in? Maybe we could help you look for books on that species.
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Old 12-12-2012, 03:57 PM   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I'm not sure I understand this precisely. Perhaps with a concrete example?



My "first" site is always Seriously Fish's knowledge base. This site is owned by Matt Ford, a professional biologist with considerable experience, and I believe I can call him a friend though we have never met face to face. Matt knows his stuff.

Beyond that, I would have to know the specific species to suggest further, as there are some reliable sites on fish families, like Planet Catfish, Loaches Online, and so forth.

Byron.

Sorry Im not explaining myself well enough! Im really not sure on specifics to be honest, I really just want some more in depth information on fish I suppose?

Behavior wise, Im interested to see if being in home aquariums will change a fishes behavior as compared to in the wild. Like, how corys live in much larger schools in the wild that usually arent feasible in home aquariums so how would being in a much smaller school affect the behavior and quality of life.
Im not sure if thats a great example to be honest, but hopefully I made myself slightly easier to understand

I know of Seriously Fish and really like it, I browse there every now and then but it looks like I should look into it more seriously. Same with planet catfish and loaches online. Ill be sure to delve into them more, thank you!

As for specific Biotopes, I suppose Im looking for a reference as to which species of plants and fish can be found together. Like instead of finding one species I like and then trying to search for others that will also fit, I wonder if there is a website/book that has lists of the plants and fish that can be found in the certain areas.
What started me on the biotope was when you suggested keeping my ember tetras with my pygmy corys and mentioned it being an SA theme. I wanted to look into plants as well and possibly turn it into a Brazilian biotope if possible, but I dont know if ember tetra and pygmy cory are even found together in the wild or what the proper set up would be and Im not sure where to look for this information.
I was going to make another topic about it but decided to wait a bit so I wont be spamming the forums :P


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekoimaiden View Post
I have to agree with Byron. Books are fast becoming outdated; by the time they hit the publisher, new information on the subjects has already been published. I reference my ichthyology texts from school a lot, but some of the best information I feel is in peer-reviewed journals which are all online.

Most of my "fish books" are actually books describing the history of goldfish breeding and things of that sort. I prefer to find care articles online because our knowledge base is growing so rapidly.

Is there a specific species you are interested in? Maybe we could help you look for books on that species.

I suppose looking into the history of certain fish keeping aspects would be a great read, I adore history as well so I cant believe I didnt think to look into it
Since its history as well, it shouldnt really change too much, or at least I hope it wouldnt!


Hmmm, i would actually like some goldfish specifics, so I'm glad you stopped in ;)
As soon as I move out, Ive got a 40 gallon breeder thats screaming goldfish to me. Either ryukins or orandas I think, but Ill worry about that when the time comes.

Other fish would be corys, I just got some and adore them. Nano fish such as Scarlet Badis, Ember Tetras, and micro raspboras and some of the rarer anabantaids. Something about Sri Lanka would be nice as I keep coming across neat things from there and would like to look at it more in depth. Oh and danios!

Pretty sure thats all but I know I'll think of more :)







Also happy to report I'll be getting a subscription to Amazonas and Tropical Fish Hobbyist for Christmas!
Hopefully those will give me a better idea of what I'll want to look into more.




-Edit-
Neat, 600 posts :D
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Old 12-12-2012, 04:47 PM   #9
 
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Quote:
Sorry Im not explaining myself well enough! Im really not sure on specifics to be honest, I really just want some more in depth information on fish I suppose?
Beyond what is in our profiles? [I'll deal with behaviours berlow]

Quote:
Behavior wise, Im interested to see if being in home aquariums will change a fishes behavior as compared to in the wild. Like, how corys live in much larger schools in the wild that usually arent feasible in home aquariums so how would being in a much smaller school affect the behavior and quality of life.
Im not sure if thats a great example to be honest, but hopefully I made myself slightly easier to understand
This is not easy to answser, and frankly I am not sure if there are such studies, or if there could be. This is a fairly new area. Only last year the first scientific study on the effects of maintaining shoaling fish in groups was carried out, and it proved what many of us have long been advocating, that in too small a group these fish are highly stressed and this increases their aggression [or sometimes the opposite, they literally pale away]. Being in too small a tank also has the same effects. The fish are lashing out at their sheer frustration the only way they can, either by fighting or giving up, to put it in simple words. So obviously these environmental factors do affect their quality of life.

Quote:
As for specific Biotopes, I suppose Im looking for a reference as to which species of plants and fish can be found together. Like instead of finding one species I like and then trying to search for others that will also fit, I wonder if there is a website/book that has lists of the plants and fish that can be found in the certain areas.
Not that I know of, or I would own it (if I could afford it). There are bits and pieces here and there though. For instance, Planet Catfish now has this feature for each species; they list the stream or river in which species A is found, and you can click it for a list of other species in the same river/stream. Only catfish though, obviously.

This data can be pieced together from other sources. I have delved into this a bit, when I was considering a truer biotope for this or that fish, and I found the info is difficult to find if it does exist which often it doesn't. What we need to do is pick some brains. Heiko Bleher for instance has a vast knowledge of the fish in various rivers, a resource I have frequently made use of. And I remember his comment in the obituary he authored in TFH when the great Jacques Gery passed away in 2005, that if you named any river in the world, Dr. Gery could, without looking it up, tell you the fish species that live in it. An amazing ichthyologist.

Quote:
What started me on the biotope was when you suggested keeping my ember tetras with my pygmy corys and mentioned it being an SA theme. I wanted to look into plants as well and possibly turn it into a Brazilian biotope if possible, but I dont know if ember tetra and pygmy cory are even found together in the wild or what the proper set up would be and Im not sure where to look for this information.
This too takes some digging. But, start with our profiles. That of Corydoras pygmaeus says this species is endemic to the Rio Madeira system in western Brazil [you prob know, endemic means it is found no where else, as far as we know], while that of Hyphessobrycon amandae [which by the way was named by Gery in honour of Amanda Bleher, Heiko's mother] gives the Araguaia River basin in the Mato Grosso, Brazil. The Araguaia flows north into the Tocantins, and the Madeira flows north into the Amazon but these basins are several hundred kilometers distant. So I would greatly doubt these fish would ever see each other in nature.

Finding plants can be even trickier, as there are few resources. And most of the streams and rivers are devoid of plants anyway, so then you are into the flooded forest if not a bare stream with sand, branches and overhanging vegetation. Here again, our profiles may give some info; C. pygmaeus profile says this species is found in large groups around aquatic or marginal vegetation and tree roots. The Ember occurs in quiet tributaries off the river channels and in backwaters and oxbow lakes where it inhabits areas of aquatic, marginal or overhanging vegetation. Searching for photos and videos of these river systems might result in some ideas. Plant species will still be difficult in most cases.

Does that help?

Byron.
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:22 PM   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Beyond what is in our profiles? [I'll deal with behaviours berlow]



This is not easy to answser, and frankly I am not sure if there are such studies, or if there could be. This is a fairly new area. Only last year the first scientific study on the effects of maintaining shoaling fish in groups was carried out, and it proved what many of us have long been advocating, that in too small a group these fish are highly stressed and this increases their aggression [or sometimes the opposite, they literally pale away]. Being in too small a tank also has the same effects. The fish are lashing out at their sheer frustration the only way they can, either by fighting or giving up, to put it in simple words. So obviously these environmental factors do affect their quality of life.



Not that I know of, or I would own it (if I could afford it). There are bits and pieces here and there though. For instance, Planet Catfish now has this feature for each species; they list the stream or river in which species A is found, and you can click it for a list of other species in the same river/stream. Only catfish though, obviously.

This data can be pieced together from other sources. I have delved into this a bit, when I was considering a truer biotope for this or that fish, and I found the info is difficult to find if it does exist which often it doesn't. What we need to do is pick some brains. Heiko Bleher for instance has a vast knowledge of the fish in various rivers, a resource I have frequently made use of. And I remember his comment in the obituary he authored in TFH when the great Jacques Gery passed away in 2005, that if you named any river in the world, Dr. Gery could, without looking it up, tell you the fish species that live in it. An amazing ichthyologist.



This too takes some digging. But, start with our profiles. That of Corydoras pygmaeus says this species is endemic to the Rio Madeira system in western Brazil [you prob know, endemic means it is found no where else, as far as we know], while that of Hyphessobrycon amandae [which by the way was named by Gery in honour of Amanda Bleher, Heiko's mother] gives the Araguaia River basin in the Mato Grosso, Brazil. The Araguaia flows north into the Tocantins, and the Madeira flows north into the Amazon but these basins are several hundred kilometers distant. So I would greatly doubt these fish would ever see each other in nature.

Finding plants can be even trickier, as there are few resources. And most of the streams and rivers are devoid of plants anyway, so then you are into the flooded forest if not a bare stream with sand, branches and overhanging vegetation. Here again, our profiles may give some info; C. pygmaeus profile says this species is found in large groups around aquatic or marginal vegetation and tree roots. The Ember occurs in quiet tributaries off the river channels and in backwaters and oxbow lakes where it inhabits areas of aquatic, marginal or overhanging vegetation. Searching for photos and videos of these river systems might result in some ideas. Plant species will still be difficult in most cases.

Does that help?

Byron.


yes, beyond the profiles though Im not sure specifically on what unfortunately. Basically I want to learn more about fish but dont know how to go about doing it or which direction I should be taking to do so.



I see, after a bit of digging I was able to find the book in which started me wondering on this topic.

Fish Behavior in the Aquarium and in the Wild by Stephan Reebs (2001, Hardcover)
(Trade Cloth, 2001) Author: Stephan Reebs

Ill probably end up purchasing it since it looks like the information I want will be marginal but at least it should give me a starting point even if the information may be out of date.


Haha, I for once actually did start with the profiles! Though it was only on the plant section since you already told me that they were both SA fish, guess I should go back and reread them!
Super helpful, it gave me some great ideas to go with!

But as far as biotopes go, it looks like itll be just looking around and seeing what fits. It honestly sounds like a fun project though, maybe I'll put together a small reference over the vast amount of time I'll have at the end of the year. I can run by everyone on the forum for mistakes and such should it pan out :)
I have a feeling its going to be more work than I'm realizing though hah!

And shoot, I didnt think they would see each other, it would have been much to easy ;)
Guess I can keep it a SA biotope and see if i can make it work. It might not be 100% correct but for being my first biotope and one in a small tank, I think I can be happy with it.


Yes, this helps a lot, thank you so much!
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