Pushing it?
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Pushing it?

This is a discussion on Pushing it? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> My 10 gallon is just about reaching the end of its cycle and I'm planning the stock. I decided I wanted to go like ...

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Old 03-24-2011, 01:42 AM   #1
 
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Pushing it?

My 10 gallon is just about reaching the end of its cycle and I'm planning the stock.

I decided I wanted to go like this:

6 Neon Tetras
4 Guppies (3 female, 1 male)
2 African dwarf frogs

Do you think I'm pushing it?
I checked the stocking calc and it says with my filter (Tetra Whisper 20) I should do atleast a 38% water change once a week.
I've also considered possibly getting another small filter just to keep up with the bio load, But, not sure yet.

Anyways what do you guys think?
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Old 03-24-2011, 01:51 AM   #2
 
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I would only get 2 guppies, both males. A 10 is not big enough for fry. Otherwise, you're okay.
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Old 03-24-2011, 01:59 AM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by jaysee View Post
I would only get 2 guppies, both males. A 10 is not big enough for fry. Otherwise, you're okay.
Yea, thats what I hear. Guppies get pregnant real easily.

So if I cut the 2 guppies out you think I should just add a few more neons? Or maybe 2 danios?
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Old 03-24-2011, 02:28 AM   #4
 
You're definitely pushing it if you go with your original plan. Not only will the likely fry overload your tank if you have both males and females, but each adult guppy will be 2 to 2.5 inches, maybe even 3" (although that's not likely with males, and even in females a 3" guppy is larger than average). Therefore, 4 or 5 guppies alone will be enough for a 10g tank, without the neons or the ADFs. Although it's not always a problem, male guppies without females can get aggressive with each other, and 10g won't allow them much room to get away from each other. I'd go with only females, if you don't want to deal with fry. Don't believe the rumor that they are colorless and boring. I have 7 female guppies who all have color, flair, and personality. (I also have 3 males, so I do get fry, but that's OK with me.)

Also, neon tetras prefer warmer, more acidic water than guppies. Guppies do best at neutral pH (7.0) or a little higher, and temps in the mid to upper 70s. Neons do best with pH around 6.5 - 6.8, and temps of 78 to 82. They are close enough that they can be housed together, but they might do better separately. Also, most sources say that neons do best in schools of at least 5, but better with more, and in odd numbers.

I think, if it were me, I would either go with 9 neon tetras alone, or 5-7 neons with ADFs, if they are compatible, which I don't know. Or, 3 to 5 guppies, with or without the ADFs, if they are compatible.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:07 AM   #5
 
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Originally Posted by Amethyst123 View Post
You're definitely pushing it if you go with your original plan. Not only will the likely fry overload your tank if you have both males and females, but each adult guppy will be 2 to 2.5 inches, maybe even 3" (although that's not likely with males, and even in females a 3" guppy is larger than average). Therefore, 4 or 5 guppies alone will be enough for a 10g tank, without the neons or the ADFs. Although it's not always a problem, male guppies without females can get aggressive with each other, and 10g won't allow them much room to get away from each other. I'd go with only females, if you don't want to deal with fry. Don't believe the rumor that they are colorless and boring. I have 7 female guppies who all have color, flair, and personality. (I also have 3 males, so I do get fry, but that's OK with me.)

Also, neon tetras prefer warmer, more acidic water than guppies. Guppies do best at neutral pH (7.0) or a little higher, and temps in the mid to upper 70s. Neons do best with pH around 6.5 - 6.8, and temps of 78 to 82. They are close enough that they can be housed together, but they might do better separately. Also, most sources say that neons do best in schools of at least 5, but better with more, and in odd numbers.

I think, if it were me, I would either go with 9 neon tetras alone, or 5-7 neons with ADFs, if they are compatible, which I don't know. Or, 3 to 5 guppies, with or without the ADFs, if they are compatible.


Neons prefer cooler, not warmer 75 degree F water as opposed to the 78 to 82 degrees F that guppies enjoy/thive in, and pH betwen 6.5 and 7.2 (for the neons)
Guppies prefer more alkaline water with ph between 7.4 and 8.0 and warmer water mentioned.
Guppies kept in cooler temps have much slower growth ,metabolisim.
Neons kept above 76 degrees F seldom live as long as those kept in cooler temps.IME

Last edited by 1077; 03-24-2011 at 03:09 AM..
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:38 AM   #6
 
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Guppies kept in cooler temps have much slower growth ,metabolisim.
Neons kept above 76 degrees F seldom live as long as those kept in cooler temps.IME
Both statements are generally true of ALL fish.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:54 AM   #7
 
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Both statements are generally true of ALL fish.


No ,both statement's are not generally true of ALL fish. Is why researching before you purchase them is encouraged.
Take cardinal tetra's for example They do indeed prefer warmer waters than the neons who prefer cooler temps.Cardinals will not last as long at cooler temps, nor neons in warmer temps
Guppies,mollies, prefer warmer water's than Platy's and Swordtails, and all livebearer's will fair much better in hard alkaline water, as opposed to soft acidic condition's that most of the tetra's and other soft water fishes thrive in.
Temp among ALL species is a big consideration not to be overlooked.Sure some fish can survive less than ideal
condition's including temps, but surviving and thriving are not the same.
Discus would be another example of fish that need warmer temps than say corydoras who prefer cooler temps with few exceptions.
Generally speaking,,, is how many folks wind up with fishes in stressful condition's which often leads to sick fish.

Last edited by 1077; 03-24-2011 at 04:08 AM..
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:26 AM   #8
 
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Neons prefer cooler, not warmer 75 degree F water as opposed to the 78 to 82 degrees F that guppies enjoy/thive in, and pH betwen 6.5 and 7.2 (for the neons)
Guppies prefer more alkaline water with ph between 7.4 and 8.0 and warmer water mentioned.
Guppies kept in cooler temps have much slower growth ,metabolisim.
Neons kept above 76 degrees F seldom live as long as those kept in cooler temps.IME
Well, that is exactly the opposite of everything I've ever seen or read, as well as my own experiences with both species.

Guppies may live longer in cooler water, because cooler water slows metabolism. That doesn't mean they're healthier.
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:35 AM   #9
 
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Well, that is exactly the opposite of everything I've ever seen or read, as well as my own experiences with both species.

Guppies may live longer in cooler water, because cooler water slows metabolism. That doesn't mean they're healthier.

Recent literature and info from those raising ,breeding, the two species will support what I have shared.
I never said Guppies would be healthier in cooler temps in fact.
Temperatures you mentioned above were/are backwards for the two species mentioned.

Last edited by 1077; 03-24-2011 at 04:37 AM..
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:42 AM   #10
 
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Recent literature and info from those raising ,breeding, the two species will support what I have shared.
I never said Guppies would be healthier in cooler temps in fact.
Temperatures you mentioned above were/are backwards for the two species mentioned.
You're right. You said they thrive in warmer temps, not cooler ones. Sorry about that.

As for the disagreement about which species prefers which temp range, I guess it depends on which experts you consult.
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