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Problems....

This is a discussion on Problems.... within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by k19smith Good question, a good weekly gravel vacuuming includes jamming lol into the gravel to get all the food and poo ...

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Old 10-05-2011, 03:57 PM   #21
 
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Originally Posted by k19smith View Post
Good question, a good weekly gravel vacuuming includes jamming lol into the gravel to get all the food and poo from between the gravel. You want a good churning.
You described it perfectly!! Thank you
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Old 10-05-2011, 03:59 PM   #22
 
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The two plecs i have are genuinely very small, and havent grown in the last two months at all, likewise with the loaches (less than 1.5 inches). i was assured by my lfs that these were small bred ones from their supplier which they have been breeding for years now at this size and do not grow any bigger than 2 inches at maximum. I will definately cut back on feeding them. the biggest fish this tank are the two mollies which are just about 2 inches.
personally, i'd ask if you can have the supplier's contact info to verify that information. it doesn't seem likely to me. i don't know of any plecos or loaches that stay that small.
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:03 PM   #23
 
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personally, i'd ask if you can have the supplier's contact info to verify that information. it doesn't seem likely to me. i don't know of any plecos or loaches that stay that small.

i will try and see if they can give me the info. i bought them from the same place another family member bought theres from last year as his are still small too, so i took it from that they were basically a 'tried and tested' as such!
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:07 PM   #24
 
one year isn't long enough. some fish grow very slowly but for a very long time.
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:09 PM   #25
 
ok, by this time next year i may have another tank anyway, so if they grow vastly, then it shouldnt be a problem
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:23 PM   #26
 
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You've had good advice from other members, so i won't repeat any of that, or try not to, except to say that nitrates are high [I assume you shake Regent #2 for 2 minutes when testing the tank too, just in case] due to the high fish load in the tanks, and too infrequent water changes. Live plants should keep them below 20ppm easily, often below 10ppm.

To the fish. Clown loach attain 12 inches. Or at least, they will if they have a 5 or 6-foot tank to grow properly. A small tank is only a temporary measure, so if a larger tank is not likely within a few months, I would consider re-homing them (other aquarists, store). Same with the pleco if it is a common pleco, they attain 18+ inches. Both fish are in our profiles, click the shaded names to see the info.

The nonsense about fish growing to the tank size is just that, nonsense. I am amazed that store staff say this. What actually occurs in too small a water volume is what we term stunting. The fish continues to grow but the internal organs cannot develop properly, so it is deformed. Immune system is weakened, so the fish acquires all sorts of other health issues it would otherwise be able to fend off. And they always die prematurely. This is a combo of physical space and water quality; so doing more frequent and larger water changes helps, to a point, but it is not the solution.

Salt: no. While livebearers can manage with salt, they do not need it. And soft water fish such as loaches, gourami, tetra, barbs, etc should not have it at all. There is no value to regular use of salt. But there is a detriment to many fish and plants.

The fish losses mentioned initially are likely due to cycling issues (ammonia or nitrite poisoning). An aquarium will cycle in 2-8 weeks. Using a bacterial supplement can speed it up, but the bacteria still must colonize the surfaces and this takes time. You can read more here in my article:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-74891/
so I won't repeat. Other than to say that a fish may survive the initial cycling issue (ammonia or nitrite or both) but it weakens them considerably and almost always leads to increased health issues and early demise. The nitrate issue would obviously be adding to the stress from the cycling; and the salt is adding more stress on top of that. You can see how each issue in itself may be minimal, but compounded they can be terminal.

Hope this helps explain things; don't hesitate to ask questions of us.

Byron.
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Old 10-05-2011, 04:41 PM   #27
 
Thanks very much for that detailed reply.

It is two ancistrus (bristlenose plecs) i have which are about 6 cm each just now, and shoul only grow to between 12cm-15cm so they should be ok, i will see about re homing the clown loaches though, my brother may add them to his in his huge tank!

i have gave the gravel another hoover (not much came up though) and changed out about 50% of the water tonight and have added no salt this time
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Old 10-05-2011, 05:34 PM   #28
 
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Thanks very much for that detailed reply.

It is two ancistrus (bristlenose plecs) i have which are about 6 cm each just now, and shoul only grow to between 12cm-15cm so they should be ok, i will see about re homing the clown loaches though, my brother may add them to his in his huge tank!

i have gave the gravel another hoover (not much came up though) and changed out about 50% of the water tonight and have added no salt this time
Sounds good. The BN are fine. Keep us posted; nitrates should go down. More plants will help, floating are especially good as they shade the light for the fish and consume a lot of nutrients.
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Old 10-06-2011, 01:02 PM   #29
 
Quick update, roughly 24 hours on, after changing approx 50% of the water last night, i have re-tested and the nitrates are still up high, so should i change more of the water again tonight? also, i have just added another 7 plants, am i best to leave it now for a day or two and retest then?
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Old 10-06-2011, 01:29 PM   #30
 
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Quick update, roughly 24 hours on, after changing approx 50% of the water last night, i have re-tested and the nitrates are still up high, so should i change more of the water again tonight? also, i have just added another 7 plants, am i best to leave it now for a day or two and retest then?
keep doing water changes. the plants will do more to keep more nitrates from forming (they primarily use the ammonia that eventually becomes nitrates normally) than they will to lower the current levels.
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