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Prime Users - dose per gallon

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Prime Users - dose per gallon
Old 07-08-2011, 11:14 AM   #11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
LOL you remember my canister. Don't worry I love my mulm. Maybe you will too once you switch to live plants. My filterless tank has a inch of black dirt under the sand in it to make up for that. The one I am redoing will be setup with the same. If you want anaerobic places that certainly has some.
I think such large volumes of decomposing organic matter is very bad - especially in a filter. It looked to me like you should have been servicing that filter much more often. All that mulm in the filter should have been in the substrate to feed the plants….right?~

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
Well copper and iron are certainly essential elements required by all living organisms to survive. You can bind up the ones in the tap water if you feel the need to, because luckily for your fishes sake these are all supplemented in most foods as well. If you are afraid of copper, just remember most parasite medications have an active copper ingredient. Iron we know is the key of the blood cells ability to transport oxygen. Lead is certainly not essential, but lead traces are quite normal. They were in my old well water and that was drink-water safe via lab tests. Most my fish are still living at that house and have been in that water for years if not their whole lives. If its drinking water you are using any harmful heavy metals like lead and mercury as well as non-heavy metals like arsenic are not going to be of concern since these must be very low for it to be drinking water safe.
I have read that even heavy metal levels 'allowed' in drinking water may be toxic to many forms of aquatic life. In part, this may be the difference between rain/run off/surface water vs. deep well where water has percolated though mineral rock...not to mention lead sweat copper plumbing (but I admit that I'm NO expert on water!).
Copper/Copper Sulfate IS a killer, including bacteria. I would not want or use it in a main tank.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
Washing the rocks and plastic plants is way overkill IMO.
Routinely cleaning the decor, like cleaning the glass makes it easier in the long run ... like pay me now or PAY me later. Cleaning the decor (and the gravel siphoning) this way would also help focus/concentrate the beneficial bacteria colony(ies) in the bio-media in the filter(s).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikaila31 View Post
But I know we do things very different. I prefer the natural way. I break all the 'rules' with my tanks. Turning filters off for days at a time, throwing bark, dead leaves, and other organics in the tanks. Next tank I am moving has not seen a gravel vac in years(and you though my canister was bad). It is one of the many reasons I have been putting off moving it for the last week. None the less all my tanks are perfectly stable. Two of mine actively consume nitrate, not produce it. One of the benefits of forsaking the bacterial cycle.
We'll need to agree to disagree. Throwing dead organic matter in the tank just unnecessarily increases the bio-load. Turning filters off just starves aerobic bacteria of necessary oxygen. The fact that algae and plants consume some nitrates does not ‘forsake the bacterial cycle’. Not sure what you meant by that?

Btw, my conventional UGF works great - just have to maintain the filter media which means gravel siphoning that I'd do even if I didn't have the UGF!
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Old 07-08-2011, 12:47 PM   #12
 
Copper sulfate is the active ingredient to copper safe, aquarisol and some other common external parasite medications. If you are not using copper then the medication usually contains formalin which is something I will not use on any of my fishes. I use copper medications exclusively for dealing with external parasites it has never once effect my fish or filter. If the heavy metals allowed in drinking water are harmful to our fish in even those traces, why are they in the fish food. You mention copper sulfate, have you ever noticed this is the same compound they add to most all fish foods to supply copper to the fishes. My hikari fish food has 7 heavy metal sulfates in the ingredients list, even NLS has 6 easily stand out heavy metals supplements in there ingredient list. The trace fertilizer I use for my plants is almost all heavy metal supplements. Along with the extra magnesium I dose. I also dose nitrates if my plants deplete them.

If large amounts of decaying organics or mulm is bad why is it at the bottom of most every lake and stream? Regardless of what I add to some of my tanks. Pounds of black dirt, sticks, bark, ect. Nitrates go down. I had 23ppm of NO3 out of the well at my old house, some of my tanks could take that down to almost nothing.

Algae and plants consume much more then just nitrates. A filterless tank does not produce nitrates in the excessive amounts a tank with a bacterial cycle does. Plants consume ammonia much more readily then they would nitrates. They also consume heavy metals, phosphates, and much much MUCH more. Plant uptakes ammonia as a form of nitrogen, no nitrite or nitrates are produced. I do foresake the bacterial cycle. My one tank has a circulation pump in it, no filter and no media. No bacterial filtration or mechanical. Sure their are bacteria, but not enough for the aquarium to be dependent on them with 20 some fish in 15 gallons along with shrimp and snails. I have pounds of plants in all my tanks. They actively consume ammonia produced in the tank, halting the typical cycling path. If you look at the nitrogen cycle in a natural pond plants play a important role in it. There is more then one way to cycle nitrogen in a aquarium. That is the basis of the walstad method.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:35 AM   #13
 
> I'm pretty sure we don't want heavy metals in the water which is why most conditioners detox for them.

> We really can't compare open flowing waters with our aquariums when it comes to handling organic waste.
In stagnant pools and swamps, excessive decomposition organic matter fouls the water and doesn't support many types of aquatic life.
I think we also have to recognize that mulm is a combination of actively decomposing material and the resulting, nearly inert humus like material. I think with the exception of that which has value to fertilize plants, excessive decomposing organic matter would best be avoided in the aquarium.

> Your probably correct - given sufficient plants with light and nutrients to support them, the aquarium may become a more manageable eco-system. I don't have a lot of experience with live plants in the aquarium but would like to at some point. The 'trouble' is my tank is now established. The (plastic) plants I have look natural and great every day and are unaffected by light, Co2, nutrients, etc. My filters are set for maximum filtration with minimum flow and the water is crystal clear and I believe spot on for the N2 cycle. So except for a side hobby of aquatic gardening, I don't have a burning incentive for live plants - maybe I'll just add some floating plants again, now that baffles prevent the surface flow from blasting them around as it did before.
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Old 07-14-2011, 02:20 PM   #14
 
Then why to plant fertilizers add them back in? I fertilize my tanks pretty heavily. N, P, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, B, Co and Mb are all elements that get intentionally added to my tanks. Most my fish have been raised in my water and breed in it. You can insist that heavy metals they are bad, but it doesn't change the fact that a lot are essential for all life. Why does it matter where they are? In the water, in the substrate, in the fish food?

Your correct about mulm being active, I use it often to boost start a tank cycle and it will give me decent nitrite readings in a day.

And established tank does not limit live plants. Crystal clear water has nothing to do with it either. You know what I throw in my tanks and my water is crystal clear too. I have a thread in the planted section of redoing a tank with a soil substrate. A couple pounds of dirt under the gravel and its still crystal clear a day after setup .
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