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Please HELP!!! My fishes are dying left and right.

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Please HELP!!! My fishes are dying left and right.
Old 12-11-2009, 07:57 PM   #31
 
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Small correction

* The bone rock bubble but not fast enough to call a fuzz
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Old 12-11-2009, 08:35 PM   #32
 
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Then I'd def suggest to find a solution for the Tetra before you loose them upping the hardness. If I would have another trip to the Airport down there I'd stop by and take 'em...but I'm not up for another day trip for a while now (Atlanta traffic can really kill ya)

You had your KH reading from yesterday w/out the rock in there correct?
Test in the AM which will then give you a 12hrs span and see how much if any it went up.
Adding Coral I'd then determine off of that. If nothing measurable happened I'd start with a ~1/2 cup coral and up it a little bit each day till you notice a rise in hardness, but I'd add no more then 1 cup to the tank (well in a sock or alike in the tank, so you can easily pull it out if its rising too far). I'd measure 2x day to see how its rising.
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Old 12-12-2009, 12:51 AM   #33
 
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aahh.. I agree with you on Atlanta traffic.. I brave it everyday :(

Thanks for the idea.. i will check the kH and pH tomorrow morning. I have a question. Initially Byron mentioned that at low pH levels Ammonia is not a problem. Now I do have ammonia in my tank. When I raise my kH (there by hoping to raise pH) will the current ammonia levels cause to problem to the survivors that I have???
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Old 12-12-2009, 05:49 AM   #34
 
50% water change,add a good amount of aquarium salt and that will help reduce nitrates,about 2 teaspoons should suffice
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Old 12-12-2009, 07:57 AM   #35
 
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Lord no! Please do NOT add salt to the tank, that'll be a clean cut kill for the Tetra's!
Just keep up your regular w/c, if you make another large one now despite your readings going down already, you'll also remove the water that's (hopefully) hardened up over night some and that's obviously not what you want to replace it with more soft tap water.
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:55 AM   #36
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madhu View Post
aahh.. I agree with you on Atlanta traffic.. I brave it everyday :(

Thanks for the idea.. i will check the kH and pH tomorrow morning. I have a question. Initially Byron mentioned that at low pH levels Ammonia is not a problem. Now I do have ammonia in my tank. When I raise my kH (there by hoping to raise pH) will the current ammonia levels cause to problem to the survivors that I have???
Fist off, you are doing things that will definitely alter the water chemistry to some extent, so be careful. Rapid changes could kill the fish, or at the very least stress them to the point they are susceptible to other internal and external problems. These things have to be done slowly.

I've no idea the extent towhich that white rock may affect hardness. I would not add crushed coral until this has sat for a couple weeks to guage the effect, with hardness readings daily at first.

Second, subsequent posts have made a couple of very inaccurate suggestions. Prime is not going to affect the tank stability (nitrification cycle). Second, salt is not going to help, and it does nothing on nitrates. Salt will counter nitrite, but one has to assess the other ramifications of using salt beforehand

Third, my earlier comments on deciding what fish were intended to point out that you cannot keep fish of differing water parameters in the same tank and expect all to be healthy. These fish come from completely different habitats. If you could get the hardness and pH to the point where it results in a slightly basic pH (slightly above 7) the existing fish would probably be fine. But this has to be done gradually over a few weeks. And you need to decide what fish in future you want--if livebearers, then work towards that and forget more characins that will never be totally happy (=healthy) in such an environment.

Byron.

Edit: Forgot the ammonia question, sorry. Yes, this can be a problem. The ammonia produced by fish changes to ammonium in acidic water, but if that water changes to basic (alkaline) the ammonium changes back to ammonia. However, using Prime and similar detoxifying products changes the ammonia to ammonium in basic water. However, another reason to avoid too rapid a change. B.

Last edited by Byron; 12-12-2009 at 02:53 PM..
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Old 12-12-2009, 02:27 PM   #37
 
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The 6.0 pH is not the thing killing your fish, it is the 1.0 ppm of ammonia. I would do a couple of massive water changes on the tank and get the ammonia under control. With tap water at a pH of over 7.0, that should also help bring the pH up a little and get your biological filter working right again. At values below about 6.2 of pH, the biological filter's action will stall.
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Old 12-12-2009, 02:44 PM   #38
 
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Ok todays readings are as below

KH - may be 0.5 dH (i tested with 10 ML and first drop almost was colorless or a pale blue, second drop a pale yellow)

pH - 6.4

Ammonia - 0.25

Nitrite - 0

Nitrate - 10

As you can see I am not sure if the bone rock increased the hardness but the pH seems to gone up from 6.0 to 6.4. can a rock increase just the pH and not raise the kH?? If yes, I want to remove this rock. Moreover, pH change from 6.0 to 6.4 in almost 23 hours is not healthy right?? should i just remove 2 out of 3 rocks? or let them continue...??

Ammonia has definitely reduced... from 1.0 on wednesday to .25 today. Should I do a water change today??

Also.. Ammonia has reduced from 1 to .25 but nitrate has not changed at all... how is this possible??

Byron, I did notice the 2 posts that were misleading... thanks for addressing it.

Like I mentioned before I am planning to get a 5G for my tetra and keep all livebearers in 10G.

May be sometime this week itself I might get it as I realize that raising the kH might impact tetra right away and I cant wait for this tank to stabilize.
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Old 12-12-2009, 02:49 PM   #39
 
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This is an identical thread (issue-wise) to http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...ng-left-33595/ in the Freshwater section. But before dealing with combining them, some comments on the two responses to correct some misinformation.

First on the ammonia, at a pH of 6 ammonia is actually ammonium and this is harmless to fish. Doing massive water changes with tap water that has a pH on the basic/alkaline side could be death to the fish. As the water in the tank becomes less acidic and gets basic/alkaline, the ammonium changes back into ammonia which will harm the fish and if sufficient could kill them. Not to mention the shock of a relatively quick pH fluctuation from 6 to 7.2 which will at the least stress the fish and possibly cause severe internal damage and death. Each degree in pH (from 6 to 7 for example) represents a ten-fold change in acidity, and that is very significant.

Second on the pH for livebearers. A pH of 6 is not recommended for livebearers that need more hardness in the water to be healthy. The pH by itself is not so much the problem as is the lack of hardness. Livebearers require water that has mineral in it, calcium and magnesium creating some hardness, and the pH will normally be above 7 as a result. From the other thread it is known that the hardness in the tap water in this case is minimal, which is why the pH in the tank drops to 6 due to the normal biological action. The advice in the other thread from several members to correct the problem can't all be repeated here.

Byron.
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Old 12-12-2009, 03:05 PM   #40
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madhu View Post
Ok todays readings are as below

KH - may be 0.5 dH (i tested with 10 ML and first drop almost was colorless or a pale blue, second drop a pale yellow)

pH - 6.4

Ammonia - 0.25

Nitrite - 0

Nitrate - 10

As you can see I am not sure if the bone rock increased the hardness but the pH seems to gone up from 6.0 to 6.4. can a rock increase just the pH and not raise the kH?? If yes, I want to remove this rock. Moreover, pH change from 6.0 to 6.4 in almost 23 hours is not healthy right?? should i just remove 2 out of 3 rocks? or let them continue...??

Ammonia has definitely reduced... from 1.0 on wednesday to .25 today. Should I do a water change today??

Also.. Ammonia has reduced from 1 to .25 but nitrate has not changed at all... how is this possible??

Byron, I did notice the 2 posts that were misleading... thanks for addressing it.

Like I mentioned before I am planning to get a 5G for my tetra and keep all livebearers in 10G.

May be sometime this week itself I might get it as I realize that raising the kH might impact tetra right away and I cant wait for this tank to stabilize.
The pH and KH are connected, so it may be due to a slight rise in KH (hardly discernable with our test kits reading in parts per million) caused by the rock. Without knowing what this rock actually is, and anyway not be a geologist, I can't answer more.

A pH rise of .4 in 24 hours won't hurt. In my planted tanks there is a natural diurnal shift in pH equal to this every 24 hours back and forth, as occurs in nature. I'm not aware of any problems for fish with this. Let's hope you're on the right track; time will tell.

I assume you are not doing daily water changes; I wouldn't, as this will cause continual fluctuation in pH and the aim is to slowly raise it over a period of time. The tetras won't have a problem with this, and provided it is not much above 7.2 in the end they should manage--but only if it occurs over time.

Nitrate should remain fairly constant, unless something occurs to affect the biological stability in the tank.

As nitrite is zero, I would not do a water change; if nitrite remains zero, regular weekly pwc is adequate. The ammonia is not an issue, Prime is handling it.

Byron.
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