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This is a discussion on Please Help.. within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Responding to your question on the tap water nitrate. If you are using the API liquid test, make sure you shake Regent #2 for ...

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Old 10-14-2011, 11:25 AM   #11
 
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Responding to your question on the tap water nitrate. If you are using the API liquid test, make sure you shake Regent #2 for 2 minutes before adding the drops to the test tube. The instructions say 30 seconds, but many have had inaccurate (and high) results unless Regent #2 is shaken for 2+ minutes. Just to confirm the nitrate of 8 in the tap water.

And that is not high enough to be problematic, once the tank is established. If you have live plants especially. Nitrates in a fish tank should be as low as possible; most of us now accept 20ppm as the highest acceptable level. Live plants will keep it below 10ppm normally, and the influx at a water change would easily be handled by plants.

Prime also detoxifies nitrate, so this would benefit there too. Prime is effective for 24-36 hours.

Byron.
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Old 10-14-2011, 11:39 AM   #12
 
PH?

I heard that high ph with bad water is really not good isent 8.2 too high for danios even with out amonia nitrite and nitrate in the water?
i have a 26 g tank cycling right now with 5 zebra danio and 6 black ruby barb
and as long as i keep my ph between 6.0 6.5 all my fish seems to be living very happily even in high amonia lvl readings , my barbs are even full of colors and fighting for the females hehe!
so maybe lowering your ph while cycling would be a good idea?
just a question thx you!
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Old 10-14-2011, 11:49 AM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxillius View Post
I heard that high ph with bad water is really not good isent 8.2 too high for danios even with out amonia nitrite and nitrate in the water?
i have a 26 g tank cycling right now with 5 zebra danio and 6 black ruby barb
and as long as i keep my ph between 6.0 6.5 all my fish seems to be living very happily even in high amonia lvl readings , my barbs are even full of colors and fighting for the females hehe!
so maybe lowering your ph while cycling would be a good idea?
just a question thx you!
To explain your situation. Ammonia in acidic water, meaning a pH below 7, automatically converts into ammonium, which is basically harmless. This is why the fish are not being affected. If you had live plants in the tank, they would grab this ammonium as their source of nitrogen.

The danger with ammonium is that should the pH rise to basic (above 7), it changes back into toxic ammonia. This might well kill the fish within minutes. This is why aquarists who have neglected water changes and have a tank with acidic pH should not do a large water change using basic tap water.

On the general issue of pH, yes, the named fish are soft water and "prefer" a slightly acidic pH. But they seem to manage in a basic pH, as far as one can tell. This varies with species, and the level of the pH.

Byron.
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Maxillius (10-14-2011)
Old 10-14-2011, 11:54 AM   #14
 
I see Thank you!
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:06 PM   #15
 
Thanx Byron

is there any thing i can do to reduce PH of my tap water ??

is shop bought distilled water the ones sold in super markets good enough ??

could I mix it with Tap water to reduce thhe PH ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
To explain your situation. Ammonia in acidic water, meaning a pH below 7, automatically converts into ammonium, which is basically harmless. This is why the fish are not being affected. If you had live plants in the tank, they would grab this ammonium as their source of nitrogen.

The danger with ammonium is that should the pH rise to basic (above 7), it changes back into toxic ammonia. This might well kill the fish within minutes. This is why aquarists who have neglected water changes and have a tank with acidic pH should not do a large water change using basic tap water.

On the general issue of pH, yes, the named fish are soft water and "prefer" a slightly acidic pH. But they seem to manage in a basic pH, as far as one can tell. This varies with species, and the level of the pH.

Byron.
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:13 PM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by denisvarghese View Post
Thanx Byron

is there any thing i can do to reduce PH of my tap water ??

is shop bought distilled water the ones sold in super markets good enough ??

could I mix it with Tap water to reduce thhe PH ?
Yes, but before embarking on attempts to change pH it is essential to understand why the pH is what it is, and this is connected to the water hardness. Attempts to change pH without addressing the hardness will usually fail, and fluctuating pH is far more harmful to fish than a stable if slightly "out of range" pH.

And the best way to explain the hardness/pH relationship is to refer you to my article on the subject:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-73276/

Once you've read that, let us know the hardness of your tap water [the water supply folks can provide this, no need for a test kit; many have a website].

Byron.
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:16 PM   #17
 
I use a product that i add to the water to lower mine i use sera Ph minus
but i guess any brand would do they even sell those that add electrolytes to the water at the same time altho i do not know if they are good or not, you will have to keep cheking your ph at least twice a day if your cycling according to my experience ph can vary alot and according to byron if it goes up 7 it isent good. It happend to me once i came home from school and all my fish where pale and not looking good i did a ph test wich was above 7 so i lowered it slowly and everything is fine now you will just have to test it often! :)
now im no expert so dont take this as immdiate advices .. i would wait for confirmation for experts hehe
but ph minus works!
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:16 PM   #18
 
Thanx Byron

shall readup, look into it and reply..

D

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Yes, but before embarking on attempts to change pH it is essential to understand why the pH is what it is, and this is connected to the water hardness. Attempts to change pH without addressing the hardness will usually fail, and fluctuating pH is far more harmful to fish than a stable if slightly "out of range" pH.

And the best way to explain the hardness/pH relationship is to refer you to my article on the subject:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-73276/

Once you've read that, let us know the hardness of your tap water [the water supply folks can provide this, no need for a test kit; many have a website].

Byron.
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Old 10-14-2011, 12:50 PM   #19
 
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PH isn't all that important. Fish can usually withstand a PH slightly out of their "normal" range. My PH is at 8.0 but they say for my Pleco 7.0 is max and he is thriving. (see avatar) This won't be the case for delicate fish. When you start trying to change your PH, you run the risk of having it fluctuate and that is worse for fish. I tried to lower my PH once with peat in the filter. It lowered to about 7.6 but went back after a week. I haven't messed with the PH since and I do not recommend it.

Your ammonia should be 0. Nitrates should be 0 but under 20ppm is acceptable. Nitrites should be 0 as well. If any of these are above the safe levels, you need to do a partial water change and add a water conditioner. I personally use Prime. It works great and not a lot it needed. Treat for the entire tank. For example, If I change 10 gallons out of my 50 gallon tank, I add enough Prime to treat 50 gallons (which is one cap full).

If you lose your fish, do not get anymore until your tank is cycled. If you lose the fish and it is not yet cycled, I'd recommend a fishless cycle. I can tell you more if it comes to that point but hopefully it won't.

Good luck with your tank.
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Old 10-14-2011, 01:05 PM   #20
 
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Quote:
When you start trying to change your PH, you run the risk of having it fluctuate and that is worse for fish. I tried to lower my PH once with peat in the filter. It lowered to about 7.6 but went back after a week.
This is due to the hardness; I linked an article detailing this in my previous post, it will explain the connection.
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