Planning for future tank. - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 12 Old 07-09-2011, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
puppyrjjkm's Avatar
 
It's actually that exact stocking list just without the swordtails and 2 leaf fish. Haha I wanted to switch everyone over to a bigger tank. Plus a snail. Everyone is doing very well together. It's been this setup for about 3 months now.The leaf fish will be upgraded here anyway in the near future as well. That's why I was surprised by some of the responses!

~3 betta boys~
~Goober~Snow~
~Bo~
puppyrjjkm is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 12 Old 07-09-2011, 12:33 PM
Member
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by puppyrjjkm View Post
It's actually that exact stocking list just without the swordtails and 2 leaf fish. Haha I wanted to switch everyone over to a bigger tank. Plus a snail. Everyone is doing very well together. It's been this setup for about 3 months now.The leaf fish will be upgraded here anyway in the near future as well. That's why I was surprised by some of the responses!
Perhaps I can explain a bit. "doing well together" is not so easy to determine. You've no idea, nor do I, as to what exactly the fish "feels" in the way of stress. Sometimes stress is easily seen in behaviours, attitude, appearance--but often it is not. If stress is present, it weakens the immune system; at some point down the road, the fish may develop some health issue related to this that it would not otherwise encounter, or it may just die "for no reason" as some would say. It is like the effect of ammonia and/or nitrite; fish may appear to survive cycling, but it has weakened them internally and this cannot be seen externally--until they suddenly get sick or die from some insignificant issue.

Second point is that nature created these fish in a certain way. They evolved over thousands and even millions of years. Ichthyologists studying the species can determine what is natural or normal for the species, i.e., what we can "expect." We cannot always explain why some fish might not be as obvious in their behaviours or reactions as others in the same species. All animals, even humans, are like this. What we do know is that certain factors can cause aggression to be intensified more often than not. Responsibility means researching the species, and providing what it is known to require and avoiding what may cause stress. This approach is more likely to result in healthy, "happy" fish, and that means a more successful community aquarium.

Here's another parallel. Smoking causes cancer, not in everyone, but the risk is high that if you smoke, you may well eventually contract cancer of some sort. Common sense tells us that if we avoid smoking, we remove the probable eventuality.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
Byron is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
future tank? alidawn15 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 23 05-23-2011 06:12 PM
Future tank fishyinpa Catfish 17 04-23-2009 03:26 AM
Future Tank , Help vinniemabuna Beginner Saltwater Aquariums 5 12-24-2006 10:56 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome