PH high everything else 0 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 05:12 AM Thread Starter
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PH high everything else 0

So my tank has been going for a week with 2 goldfish in (suggested by pet shop even though want to start freshwater tropical and didn't know better at the time).
But my pH is 8 (tap pH 7.0) and ammonia, nitrites and nitrates are 0... Does that mean my biological filter is working correctly?

Thought it was the stones causing high pH: its not the aquarium checked they are just painted quartz and theres just some live plants everything is fake ornaments! Ive done water changes 20% and the drops slightly but back up the next day

The aquarium store thinks its new tank syndrome but they still don't know why everything else is 0 and that some ammonia should be detected by now??

Thoughts?
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post #2 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 05:13 AM Thread Starter
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Its 100L with the overhead filter with carbon, bioballs and ceramic rings. Theres also an airstone going.
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post #3 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by jc88 View Post
So my tank has been going for a week with 2 goldfish in (suggested by pet shop even though want to start freshwater tropical and didn't know better at the time).
But my pH is 8 (tap pH 7.0) and ammonia, nitrites and nitrates are 0... Does that mean my biological filter is working correctly?

Thought it was the stones causing high pH: its not the aquarium checked they are just painted quartz and theres just some live plants everything is fake ornaments! Ive done water changes 20% and the drops slightly but back up the next day

The aquarium store thinks its new tank syndrome but they still don't know why everything else is 0 and that some ammonia should be detected by now??

Thoughts?

Live plants will prevent the ammonia spike and raise the PH.

PH rises because the plants suck out the co2. So I always measure pH just before lights out. PH will be lowest just before lignts on. A high pH just before lights out indicates the plants are processing the co2 so the tank is a net consumer of co2 and producer of oxygen each 24 hour period.

my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #4 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
Live plants will prevent the ammonia spike and raise the PH.

PH rises because the plants suck out the co2. So I always measure pH just before lights out. PH will be lowest just before lignts on. A high pH just before lights out indicates the plants are processing the co2 so the tank is a net consumer of co2 and producer of oxygen each 24 hour period.

my .02
That's really interesting... I never knew plants could affect ph like that!


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post #5 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 10:25 AM
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That's really interesting... I never knew plants could affect ph like that!
Yep it does.

Plus plant also prefer to consume ammonia directly over nitrates. So it is possible to have an initial nitrAte spike during the cycle but low or no ammonia spike.

all my tanks have been planted with marine tanks using macro algae. Even with peat moss in the substrate, after a week or two the pH rises to purple (8.4-8.8) on the api high range test kit. But then my FW also does not have mechanical circulation of any type which could allow the co2 to become very low.

stll just my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #6 of 7 Old 10-02-2013, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
Live plants will prevent the ammonia spike and raise the PH.

PH rises because the plants suck out the co2. So I always measure pH just before lights out. PH will be lowest just before lignts on. A high pH just before lights out indicates the plants are processing the co2 so the tank is a net consumer of co2 and producer of oxygen each 24 hour period.

my .02
Thanks heaps!!! Also Someone said in another post that running the airstone gasses out the co2? So pretty much I have a double whammy of knocking out the co2 and raising my pH?

Thing is I want to stock fish with a pH mid to lowish 7's. what do you recommend? Reduce the amount of plants? Get driftwood??
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post #7 of 7 Old 10-03-2013, 09:19 AM
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Thanks heaps!!! Also Someone said in another post that running the airstone gasses out the co2? So pretty much I have a double whammy of knocking out the co2 and raising my pH?

Thing is I want to stock fish with a pH mid to lowish 7's. what do you recommend? Reduce the amount of plants? Get driftwood??

It's even simpler that that.

I simply find it very hard to believe that any fish from any wild environment will not do better in an environment low in carbon dioxide and high in oxygen.

I have had fish like silver hatchetfish and various tetras which are reported to "need a low ph soft environment like ph of 6-7" thrive and live for years in planted tank with a pH of 8.4-8.8.

I did find that using peat moss prevents the KH and GH from rising and neon tetras did much better in those environments.

So overall, to me it is not the pH value but the reason for that value that is important.

Simply sucking out co2 with the resultant pH rise can hardly detrimental to any fish.


my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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