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post #1 of 13 Old 04-06-2013, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
Ph

I have a ten gallon planted tank with 3 guppies (and a snail that hitchhiked). I just added the guppies 2 days ago. Back when I was still cycling I added an extra bag of gravel and the Ph shot up to 8.2. Because my tap water has 7.6 Ph it was slowly comming down with water changes. However, I just tested it again and got this:
Ammonia- 0
Nitrite- 0
Nitrate- 10
Ph- 8.2

What made it come back up?? The only thing different lately is I added fish... But that shouldn't do anything to Ph. I know that livebearers like more basic water but 8.2 seems a little high.

On another note, I just added 3 guppies and my biological filter and plants are handling it with flying colors. Is it safe to add another 3 guppies? If not when do I know when it is safe to add more?

Thanks in advance
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post #2 of 13 Old 04-06-2013, 08:21 PM
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What kind of rocks did you add? Calcareous rocks will raise your pH, this would be things like crushed coral, aragonite, or similar. They will continue to 'dissolve' minerals forever until gone.

However, a pH of 8.2 is nothing to worry about with these fish. A perfectly neutral 7.0 is actually extremely abnormal in nature. The important thing is stability. You don't want the pH swinging by a large amount. pH will often change a little throughout the day, but not by a large amount in a healthy system. Be sure you test at the same time every day because of that.

As for adding fish, I would wait at least 2 weeks, if not 4 weeks, before new additions. This is assuming the new fish were not quarantined as most people don't.

Even if quarantined, I'd wait 1 week minimum. You want to give the tank time to adjust and to ensure no ammonia/nitrite is forming.
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post #3 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 10:16 AM
JDM
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Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
....

As for adding fish, I would wait at least 2 weeks, if not 4 weeks, before new additions. This is assuming the new fish were not quarantined as most people don't.

Even if quarantined, I'd wait 1 week minimum. You want to give the tank time to adjust and to ensure no ammonia/nitrite is forming.
Ditto.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #4 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 11:11 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Geomancer View Post
What kind of rocks did you add? Calcareous rocks will raise your pH, this would be things like crushed coral, aragonite, or similar. They will continue to 'dissolve' minerals forever until gone.

However, a pH of 8.2 is nothing to worry about with these fish. A perfectly neutral 7.0 is actually extremely abnormal in nature. The important thing is stability. You don't want the pH swinging by a large amount. pH will often change a little throughout the day, but not by a large amount in a healthy system. Be sure you test at the same time every day because of that.

As for adding fish, I would wait at least 2 weeks, if not 4 weeks, before new additions. This is assuming the new fish were not quarantined as most people don't.

Even if quarantined, I'd wait 1 week minimum. You want to give the tank time to adjust and to ensure no ammonia/nitrite is forming.
It was just normal aquarium gravel... Now that I think about it I put in a single rock to tie my java fern to as well. But I don't think that could cause a .4 Ph jump...

Ok, I'll wait longer to add more fish,

Thanks for the feedback
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post #5 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 01:04 PM
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you c an try a viegar test on the rocks and décor you have in the tank. if it fizzes when vinegar is poured on it then it messes with ph.
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 01:42 PM
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I would re-test your tap water. Assuming you tested it yourself, you may not have out-gassed the CO2, and this will give an incorrect (and lower) reading. To out-gas the CO2, let a glass of tap water sit for 24 hours, or place some in a jar and shake it very briskly for a few minutes. Then test. You may find the tap is closer to 8.2 in fact.

Regardless of that, as someone mentioned the livebearers will be fine in harder water with a higher pH. Soft water fish would be a very different story.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
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I would re-test your tap water. Assuming you tested it yourself, you may not have out-gassed the CO2, and this will give an incorrect (and lower) reading. To out-gas the CO2, let a glass of tap water sit for 24 hours, or place some in a jar and shake it very briskly for a few minutes. Then test. You may find the tap is closer to 8.2 in fact.

Regardless of that, as someone mentioned the livebearers will be fine in harder water with a higher pH. Soft water fish would be a very different story.

Byron.
Ok, thats probally a good idea. Ok, I will.

Edit: I just realized that as well as adding fish I have also kept the air pump much longer every day.. Your post on Co2 gassing out reminded me of that. Thats probally why my Ph went back up.

Last edited by fish keeper 2013; 04-07-2013 at 01:56 PM.
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-07-2013, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 View Post
Ok, thats probally a good idea. Ok, I will.

Edit: I just realized that as well as adding fish I have also kept the air pump much longer every day.. Your post on Co2 gassing out reminded me of that. Thats probally why my Ph went back up.
+1
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post #9 of 13 Old 04-08-2013, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by fish keeper 2013 View Post
I have a ten gallon planted tank with 3 guppies (and a snail that hitchhiked). I just added the guppies 2 days ago. Back when I was still cycling I added an extra bag of gravel and the Ph shot up to 8.2. Because my tap water has 7.6 Ph it was slowly comming down with water changes. However, I just tested it again and got this:
Ammonia- 0
Nitrite- 0
Nitrate- 10
Ph- 8.2

What made it come back up?? The only thing different lately is I added fish... But that shouldn't do anything to Ph. I know that livebearers like more basic water but 8.2 seems a little high.

On another note, I just added 3 guppies and my biological filter and plants are handling it with flying colors. Is it safe to add another 3 guppies? If not when do I know when it is safe to add more?

Thanks in advance

Simple.. the plants are reducing carbon dioxide which raises pH.

Very common in planted tanks. In fact with my non filtered, no circulation tanks those values are normal and expected.

IMHO it is hardly dangerous to the fish to have a low co2 environment.


my .02

maintain Fw and marine system with a strong emphasis on balanced, stabilized system that as much as possible are self substaning.

have maintained FW systems for up to 9 years with descendants from original fish and marine aquariums for up to 8 years.

With no water changes, untreated tap water, inexpensive lighting by first starting the tank with live plants (FW) or macro algae( marine)

see: http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/a...-build-295530/
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post #10 of 13 Old 04-08-2013, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post
Simple.. the plants are reducing carbon dioxide which raises pH.



my .02

you have this revers, ph lowers not raises :P
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