Peru Gold Stripe Cory - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
Peru Gold Stripe Cory

I bought a Peru Gold Stripe Cory a couple of weeks back. I love him. He's my tank favourite. He wasn't even for sale, but hidden away in a back, bottom tank at my local Big Al's. They know me pretty well now, and offered me one for $6.

I've done google searches and cannot find any information on them. About the only thing I can confirm is that the Peru Gold Stripe and the "Orange Laser" are not the same Cory and not to be confused as such. I'd like to find 2 more so they can school.

Anyone have any info on these cuties? Lifespan, adult size, etc.?
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post #2 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 10:30 AM
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This is, at present, considered a variant of Corydoras aeneus. If you have a read of our profile (click the shaded name) it mentions the various "stripe" species and there is a link in the References to some photos.

Further scientific examination may result in various new species, but for the moment, as far as I am aware, these laser strip corys are Corydoras sp. aff. aeneus and some have a "C" number to distinguish them apart.

Our profile gives water param and other info. Bear in mind that these will be wild caught fish and thus the water parameters are important.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
Thank you, Byron!

I assumed he was wild-caught, judging from his rarity. He seems to be doing extremely well in my 20 G tank. Active, gregarious, excellent appetite, beautiful colours. He seems to enjoy frozen thawed bloodworms the best. Sucks them up like a little Hoover.

My only concern is that the tank has small gravel substrate, not sand. His barbels seem fine, but this doesn't allow him to dig.

I asked when I bought him if he'd be ok alone, and was assured he would be. I will, however, find him some mates to hang out with.
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post #4 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Stormfish View Post
Thank you, Byron!

I assumed he was wild-caught, judging from his rarity. He seems to be doing extremely well in my 20 G tank. Active, gregarious, excellent appetite, beautiful colours. He seems to enjoy frozen thawed bloodworms the best. Sucks them up like a little Hoover.

My only concern is that the tank has small gravel substrate, not sand. His barbels seem fine, but this doesn't allow him to dig.

I asked when I bought him if he'd be ok alone, and was assured he would be. I will, however, find him some mates to hang out with.
He absolutely needs other corys. All corydoras are social fish, living in groups of hundreds. In the aquarium, different species is fine, they all get along. I have about 30 corys representing a dozen species in my 115g and even when there are 4 of a species, individuals will often chum around with a cory of another species, tickling each other with their barbels (a sign of affection one write put it) etc. Any species that you like, but another 4-5. If you want several species, minimum of 3 of each is best when possible.

Sand is best, but if the gravel is not rough it will be OK.

What species was he mixed in with, out of curiosity? I might be able to discern the locale.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 01:45 PM Thread Starter
He was alone in his own tank with his own species. IIRC, there were only 3 of them in the tank altogether.

I'm on the waiting list for 2 more of them. No idea when they'll be in.
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post #6 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 03:25 PM
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He was alone in his own tank with his own species. IIRC, there were only 3 of them in the tank altogether.

I'm on the waiting list for 2 more of them. No idea when they'll be in.
As the "common" name implies, they come from Peru, and fish exports from Peru are quite good these days. But this season has been nasty, and imports sporadic. One of the local exporters mentioned that he has never seen such rain in 23 years of collecting fish. Thousands of indiginous people are without homes because the flood took them. The collector said he was unable to collect in one region earlier because of drought this spring, and now he is unable to collect in another because of flooding.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
Interesting. Any ideas on how they catch them? I know with Otos there is discussion about collectors adding a small amount of cyanide to the water to slow them down. It made me feel guilty about buying them and supporting such a thing. I'm just curious since you know the details about how the Corys are caught.

When I got this Gold Stripe, I actually listed a pair of another kind of Cory I wanted to purchase. But the guy showed me the Gold Stripe and told me they weren't listed for sale, but he'd let one go to me. I should have asked for all three of them.

With Peru in such environmental turmoil, it may be a while before this little fella gets some friends. In the meantime, he has 7 bottom-dwelling friends — 4 ADFs and 3 Otos — to keep him company. He hangs out with one of the female ADFs quite a bit, actually. And she doesn't seem to mind him at all.
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post #8 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 06:56 PM
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Interesting. Any ideas on how they catch them? I know with Otos there is discussion about collectors adding a small amount of cyanide to the water to slow them down. It made me feel guilty about buying them and supporting such a thing. I'm just curious since you know the details about how the Corys are caught.

When I got this Gold Stripe, I actually listed a pair of another kind of Cory I wanted to purchase. But the guy showed me the Gold Stripe and told me they weren't listed for sale, but he'd let one go to me. I should have asked for all three of them.

With Peru in such environmental turmoil, it may be a while before this little fella gets some friends. In the meantime, he has 7 bottom-dwelling friends — 4 ADFs and 3 Otos — to keep him company. He hangs out with one of the female ADFs quite a bit, actually. And she doesn't seem to mind him at all.
I've heard of cyanide and blasting for reef fish, but not otos. But anything is possible, sad to say. But on a brighter note, there are programs in place in many parts of SA to maintain a sustainable ornamental fish habitat through responsible collection. Project Piaba is one. Several local families are able to maintain a decent economic life just by fish collecting for the hobby, and this preserves the forests which other wise might well be cut down for farming which ironically is not usually as successful.

Here's a video of collecting otos in their habitat:

I seriously would get a couple more corys of some species you like, soon. There are more than 100 described species, and many others awaiting classification. Several are in our profiles [second tab from the left in the blue bar across the top of the page]. A trio of a species you like and can find locally would be wise. The fact that your cory is trying to chum around with the ADF is a sign that he is getting lonely and thus stressed, and this weakens the fish quickly. A few weeks ago this cory was swimming in a Peruvian stream with thousands of his own; now he has undergone the rigors of netting, transport, and finds himself alone in a strange environment that nature did not equip him for. I'm not making this into a melodrama, but simply putting things in the proper perspective. The blue paragraph below my signature is apropos.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 18 Old 05-18-2012, 08:06 PM Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
A few weeks ago this cory was swimming in a Peruvian stream with thousands of his own; now he has undergone the rigors of netting, transport, and finds himself alone in a strange environment that nature did not equip him for. I'm not making this into a melodrama, but simply putting things in the proper perspective. The blue paragraph below my signature is apropos.
My Gawd! Now I feel even worse for him. Thanks so much, Byron! LOL!

Tomorrow he'll get some little buddies. I'll go down to the huge Big Al's where they have more Corys to choose from.

P.S. Hearing about responsible collecting makes me happy!
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post #10 of 18 Old 05-19-2012, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
All is well that ends well. The last shop I went to today, and the last tank I looked at... had a whack of baby Gold Stripes! So I picked up 3. That's not even the best part of all.

<drum roll please>

These 3 were captive bred locally.
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