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Overcrowding 58g?

This is a discussion on Overcrowding 58g? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Thanks! For some reason I thought that they created a heavier load than other comparably sized fish....

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Old 01-31-2011, 03:42 PM   #11
 
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Thanks! For some reason I thought that they created a heavier load than other comparably sized fish.
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Old 01-31-2011, 03:54 PM   #12
 
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You might be thinking of plecos. Their bioload is fairly large for their size.
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Old 01-31-2011, 04:33 PM   #13
 
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I want to say I was mislead at petsmart when I got my first aquarium and that just kind of stuck. Thanks for the info guys!

The lonely guy I have now is an Emerald Corydora. He is kind of large, maybe 2.25 - 2.5 inches, I'm looking for a species a little smaler and very good looking, any sugestions?
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Old 01-31-2011, 04:53 PM   #14
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanmiller09 View Post
I want to say I was mislead at petsmart when I got my first aquarium and that just kind of stuck. Thanks for the info guys!

The lonely guy I have now is an Emerald Corydora. He is kind of large, maybe 2.25 - 2.5 inches, I'm looking for a species a little smaler and very good looking, any sugestions?
With a "common" name of Emerald Cory, it is quite probably Brochis splendens and not Corydoras aeneus. These two look almost identical in pattern/colour, but the Brochis is larger and has a longer dorsal fin. You can see this in the photos in the profile of the species here, click on the shaded name. Brochis and Corydoras are very close families, some ichthyologists have suggested combining them, or at least putting Brochis in with a few of the "different" Corydoras as a separate genus. Care and habits are basically identical, but Brochis is considerably larger and that needs to be considered from the point that a group of them will be much more visible.
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Old 01-31-2011, 07:42 PM   #15
 
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Byron, you are, once again, correct. It is a B. Splendens.

Any thoughts on going with a group of about 10 dwarf style Corydora? Would their size (about 1") be a problem with the Boesemani?
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Old 01-31-2011, 07:58 PM   #16
 
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Byron, you are, once again, correct. It is a B. Splendens.

Any thoughts on going with a group of about 10 dwarf style Corydora? Would their size (about 1") be a problem with the Boesemani?
I have not personally kept rainbows, but my understanding is that they are not aggressive. Remember that the dwarf species of cory spend much more time mid-water than on the substrate; point here is that "substrate" fish are best on the substrate for interest.
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:04 PM   #17
 
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I had read that, I just didn't know how much time they actually spent off the substrate. Is it just for getting from point A to B or do they also feed mid level? I do not see a dwarf Corydora being able to compete for food with a rainbowfish.

Last edited by Seanmiller09; 01-31-2011 at 08:04 PM.. Reason: forgot
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:14 PM   #18
 
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I had read that, I just didn't know how much time they actually spent off the substrate. Is it just for getting from point A to B or do they also feed mid level? I do not see a dwarf Corydora being able to compete for food with a rainbowfish.
I've had all three "dwarf" species from time to time, now I have C. pygmaeus which seem to be a bit hardier. These three species are certainly the most sensitive and delicate of the corys, at least in my 15 years keeping about 30 different species. The dwarfs do swim off the substrate most of the time, generally over plant leaves, wood, etc; they feed everywhere, they love to browse over plant leaves for tidbits, and will eat from sinking foods on the bottom. Mine have never fed at the surface.
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Old 02-01-2011, 04:43 AM   #19
 
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A few years back I had a really amazing looking Corydora. He was about 1.25" blue green and black, with a small amount of red near the dorsal fin. I never knew what it actually was since all that was written on the glass was "Corey Cat". He only lived about 4 months, but he would flip upside down when I would feed the tank, and skim the surface, then go back to digging around the substrate. My favorite Corydora I have ever seen.

A little off topic but I was reminded by your last post.
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