Overcrowding 58g? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 19 Old 01-30-2011, 10:14 AM Thread Starter
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Overcrowding 58g?

Hey everyone, well I finally finished the cycle on my new 58g (36x18x21). Now time to start stocking and getting serious on the aquascape, but I think my plans might be too heavy for this tank. So i need a few sugestions.

The tank will be moderately to heavily planted, filter is a trickle style holding an extra 6-8 gallons depending on how full it is, not sure on the flow rate of the pump, but it is enough to cause a small amount of current in the tank.

I transfered a few fish into it already:
2 M. Boesemani
5 Serpae Tetra
1 lonlely Zebra (will be removed soon)
1 lonley Red Eye Tetra (though he seems to be schooling with the Boesemanis. He is about 4 years old, so pretty close in size to the young bows)

My plan thus far:
8-10 Serpae Tetra
8-10 Lemon Tetra
5-6 M. Boesemani (5 if I currently have a m/f pair, 6 if I have 2 males)
1 Pleco

Up for thought:
Clean up crew (any thoughts? Ive got one corydora in one of my 10g that could use some mates)
Leave the Red Eye (He has been on his own and with me for 4 years, its hard to think about taking him out)
I really want some Cardinal Tetras, but I'm pretty sure the Boesemani would eat these once they were full grown.

Will these fish overcrowd this tank? Is there enough swiming area for these fish? I would think the bio load would be ok since I plan on moving many plants into the tank once I can find the appropriate river rocks I've been lookig for.

Thoughts? Sugestions? Relentless criticism? All welcome, and greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Sean
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-30-2011, 03:52 PM
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The Rainbow will be better in the group, 6+ but in a 3-foot tank 5-6 is probably max; they are active and like swimming space, so keep that in mind when planting [plants around the sides and back]. I would not add cardinals to this mix. Lemons will be fine.

Serpae Tetra is not a species I would ever have in community tanks due to their possible aggressive nature; a larger group as you're planning will lessen this, or may, but it is in the fish's nature to be feisty and this can be troublesome later even if not showing up now. I have twice acquired "possibly feisty" fish and in a 5-foot 115g aquarium, and had to remove them after a few days due to aggressive behaviour stressing out the other fish. This is a risk I would not want to repeat, so a caution.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 19 Old 01-30-2011, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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I was worried I would get that response. I really like my Serpaes but they are kind of agressive toward eachother, and I would not like that to spill out onto my more expensive fish.

If my tank was stocked with the following fish, would I have room / volume of water to add an additional school of non-agressive tetra?

5 M. Boesemani
5 Corydora
10 Lemon Tetra
1 Pleco

If so, any sugestions? I'm looking for some blues or reds.
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post #4 of 19 Old 01-30-2011, 07:03 PM
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Not sure if they would be an option as far as water needs but I think a group of black neon tetras would look stunning in a tank with the above fish.

Kindest Regards,
Amanda

Keeping fish its not a hobby it is a passion!

55 gallon, 44 gallon, one 20 gallon tank, three 10 gallon tanks, and a 2.5 gallon all with real plants.

I have MTS and there is no cure.

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post #5 of 19 Old 01-30-2011, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanmiller09 View Post
I was worried I would get that response. I really like my Serpaes but they are kind of agressive toward eachother, and I would not like that to spill out onto my more expensive fish.

If my tank was stocked with the following fish, would I have room / volume of water to add an additional school of non-agressive tetra?

5 M. Boesemani
5 Corydora
10 Lemon Tetra
1 Pleco

If so, any sugestions? I'm looking for some blues or reds.
Thinking colour then, the rainbows are bright yellow and blue. Lemon tetra complement this, more yellow. Tetra of near-identical colour to the Serpae are several species in Hyphessobrycon, like Rosy Tetra, Roberts Tetra. Very peaceful, a group of 7-8 would be fine.

If youhave soft slightly acidic water, cardinal tetra could work; but they do not last in hard water, as noted in the profile.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-31-2011, 05:15 AM Thread Starter
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Well, after taking all of your sugestions into account, I think I'm just going to worry about getting the tank aquascaped and breaking my bank trying to get another 3 Boesemani (Hopefuly female). I asked for a m/f pair at my lfs, but im not sure the employee was able to do it at such a young age. They are starting to show color, but not very much.

Does anyone know of a method for sexing young Boesemani?

Also, does anyone know of a reputable online store that I could order more Boesemani from that isn't going to cost me almost $29 (US) for two? I Think the LFS that had them in stock is a little expensive in town.

I have found a few retailers, but they seem like larger corperate style companies. I would much rather buy from someone who is actually passoniate about breeding and can breed fish with colors closer to those seen in nature.
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post #7 of 19 Old 01-31-2011, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Does anyone know of a method for sexing young Boesemani?
My research is that juveniles are impossible to tell, and lack the colour; it can be up to 12 months before the fish really show their vibrant colours. When that occurs, females will be rounder, and males will frequently display to each other and be brighter coloured if there are several of them (males).

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 01-31-2011 at 02:48 PM.
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-31-2011, 02:08 PM
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I like the mix a lot, but I would increase the cories to 8 or 9.
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post #9 of 19 Old 01-31-2011, 03:18 PM Thread Starter
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I guess I will have to wait to find out, Im sure an LFS would love to trade out a few full colored Boesemani for a few young ones if I wind up with all male. I really want a high female to male ratio.

Isn't the bioload from Corys fairly large? Also, will a mixture of different color Corydora still gain the benefits and comfort of a school or are they like Tetras and must be kept in a specific group?
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post #10 of 19 Old 01-31-2011, 03:38 PM
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Corys have no more impact on the bioload than other fish of comparable size. And they are shoaling fish, which live in groups numbering in the hundreds in their habitat waters, so they need companions. I have found that a minimum of three of each species works, but I prefer five of each if I have the space and can find them. Some species have a real preference for their own, others don't seem so concerned. I think the main thing is more corys, they interact quite a bit with each other, and the more there are the more "relaxed" they will be, which means less stress and better health. They are inherently very skittish, and higher numbers tends to ease this quite a bit.

In your 3-foot 58g tank, I would suggest 9 corys max, which could be 3 of 3 species, or 4-5 of two species, or all one.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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