Over-Stocked? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 23 Old 01-13-2010, 07:11 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Thanks for all the responses everyone. Here are my current water conditions:

Nitrates: between 20-40 ppm
Nitrates, Chlorine: 0
Hardness (GH): 300 ppm [I have been using tap water while home so this number is high and is generally closer to 75-100]
Alkalinity (KH): 80-120 ppm
Ph: about 7.2

I'm a bit worried that the nitrates are that high considering I changed the water (~25-30%) in the tank yesterday.
Fishingtons is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 23 Old 01-14-2010, 02:04 AM
MOA
New Member
 
Well, like I said, according to some standards your tank is overstocked. But there are other explanations: too much food, not enough porous decor, stray cleaning chemicals, absorbed chemicals from aerosol canisters, etc. I would try feeding the fish a bit less than you normally do and see if that produces an effect (I normally skip feedings one day a week).

MOA
MOA is offline  
post #13 of 23 Old 01-14-2010, 03:32 AM
Member
 
1077's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishingtons View Post
Hi everyone, this is my first post and thread. I have been keeping a ten gallon aquarium for about 5 months now. I've tried to research as much as possible and take the best care of the fish that I could. For most of the five months I had been keeping 3 spotted corydoras and 6 zebra danios (glofish). I have been performing 20-25% water changes every week. I have been doing occasional water testing (1-2 per month), my water conditions have been excellent for most of the life of the aquarium. I have also added appropriate amounts of aquarium salt during each water change. I have had such good experiences with this tank that I decided to start another 29 gallon tank. I keep both my 10 and 29 (currently uninhabited) tanks at my house in the city in which I go to college but I brought my 10 gallon and my fish home to a different city. While I've been home, I found a store with beautiful fancy guppies that I could not pass on. I bought 6 and put them in my 10 gallon with the intent to keep them there for no more than 1 1/2 weeks before placing some of the fish in my other tank. I have been told to strictly follow the 1 inch per gallon rule and have been mostly compliant. However, even with the 6 guppies, 6 zebra danios, and 2 corys (1 died as a result of stress from the trip I believe) my tank actually does not 'appear' crowded. Actually the guppies and glofish are quite beautiful together. My question is this: is my tank dangerously overstocked? I will separate these fish soon if they are but I would prefer to keep them in their current condition if they are not.

ALSO

If the tank is overstocked then I will remove the glofish and the corys and make my 10 gallon a guppy only tank. I have three pregnant females and I was hoping to try to raise their fry. How many guppies can I safely put in a 10 gallon tank? Again I am familiar with the 1 inch per gallon rule but I have seen many guppies (10+) in much smaller confines than a 10 gallon tank and I have also heard an extreme case where someone had nearly 100 in a 10 gallon (I have no intentions of coming close to that).

Thanks for your help.
With three pregnant female guppies ,assuming that water suits their efforts,, You could easily have upwards of sixty fish in the ten gallon tank within the next month and the population will increase rather quickly for it is what guppies do.
I have found that guppies do better with warmer temps than the danios would appreciate. I keep guppies at 80 degrees and I keep long finned danios at around 75 degrees.

The most important medication in your fish medicine cabinet is.. Clean water.
1077 is offline  
post #14 of 23 Old 05-08-2010, 11:40 AM
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
STOCKING: I don't usually count my work horses. i.e. cleaner fish. Yes, they have a bio load that has to be accounted for but they are part of the system. If you would like groups and a variety then plan on stocking your tank VERY slowly and monitoring it with regular testing. Its a balancing act and not as much fun as throwing a bunch of fish together but you might be surprised at the sheer amount and variety you can achieve if you go slow and stock your tank based on it's needs.
TexasTanker is offline  
post #15 of 23 Old 05-08-2010, 12:01 PM
Member
 
redchigh's Avatar
 
[QUOTE=Fishingtons;305610]Thanks for all the responses everyone. Here are my current water conditions:


Nitrates, Chlorine: 0

QUOTE]

I dont get it.

If you're worried about stocking, you need to test ammonia and nitrites. That will help tell you if you have a good balance or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Christople View Post
^^ genius
__________________

Soil Substrates Guide:
Part 1
--------- Part 2

_____________________
redchigh is offline  
post #16 of 23 Old 05-08-2010, 12:44 PM
New Member
 
Is this a bare tank, what is the filtration used?
rsn48 is offline  
post #17 of 23 Old 05-08-2010, 01:37 PM
Here's what I would do...

Move everything SLOWLY into the 29-gallon. Use the 10-gallon to raise the fry. Add some guppy grass to it.

Stop using salt.

Get 3 more corys, and 3 more female guppies.

Enjoy!
Mister Sparkle is offline  
post #18 of 23 Old 05-10-2010, 05:06 AM
Member
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTanker View Post
STOCKING: I don't usually count my work horses. i.e. cleaner fish. Yes, they have a bio load that has to be accounted for but they are part of the system. If you would like groups and a variety then plan on stocking your tank VERY slowly and monitoring it with regular testing. Its a balancing act and not as much fun as throwing a bunch of fish together but you might be surprised at the sheer amount and variety you can achieve if you go slow and stock your tank based on it's needs.
Hmm algae-eating fish usually come with a substantial bio-load. Bristlenose plecos seem to produce three or four times the amount of waste of a fish of equal size, for example. If anything, "work horses" should count extra against the bioload and for that reason, they should really only be added if you like the fish rather than with expectations of them reducing the load on the tank and the amount of work you'll have to do to maintain it as a result.

4 8 15 16 23 42
iamntbatman is offline  
post #19 of 23 Old 05-10-2010, 09:19 PM
Member
 
TexasTanker's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
Hmm algae-eating fish usually come with a substantial bio-load. Bristlenose plecos seem to produce three or four times the amount of waste of a fish of equal size, for example. If anything, "work horses" should count extra against the bioload and for that reason, they should really only be added if you like the fish rather than with expectations of them reducing the load on the tank and the amount of work you'll have to do to maintain it as a result.
I would never put a bristle nose pleco in a ten gallon tank. They get too big for that. I was referring to the various kinds of cory and catfish that stay below two inches. If I'm not mistaken their bioload would the equivalent of a same size tetra or like sized fish that is not actively or quickly growing.

What I said, is I do not count them in my "inch count" but I also said they have to be accounted for. Which means bioloads. At a certain point extra filtration, plants and all that cannot compensate the extra fish. But a better filtration system can allow for a few extra "inches" to be tacked onto the standard "inch rule". Three cory and six guppy is a sustainable bioload for a ten gallon tank. Assuming they have fry, they could very easy throw off that balance, but as others have said, short term is doable. Keeping the ten gallon as a strictly fry tank with the intention of releasing them to the larger tank later, assuming that tank can handle the load is also a practical plan.

Its just about maintenance and careful balancing.
TexasTanker is offline  
post #20 of 23 Old 05-11-2010, 12:00 AM
Member
 
teddyzaper's Avatar
 
also, ottos woudl fit that tank nicely. i agree with everything angel has said so far, and everone else. ditch the salt please.

Subject: Larry LaPrise dead at 93

With all the sadness and trauma going on in the world at the moment, it is worth reflecting on the death of a very important person, which almost went unnoticed last week.

Larry LaPrise, the man that wrote "The Hokey Pokey" died peacefully at the age of 93. The most traumatic part for his family was getting him into the coffin. They put his left leg in. And then the trouble started.
teddyzaper is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stocked after 1 day Trixsta Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 22 10-10-2009 02:13 AM
Is this ok or am I over stocked.... Calmwaters Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 11 09-09-2009 10:05 AM
Got it stocked, 1 more Question 36Bones Freshwater and Tropical Fish 2 02-12-2008 07:14 PM
Hmm over stocked? Little-Fizz Freshwater and Tropical Fish 11 01-03-2008 08:45 PM
Stocked 55G, comments Hyperlite Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 11 08-27-2007 08:36 PM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome