Over Filtering
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » Over Filtering

Over Filtering

This is a discussion on Over Filtering within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Just wondered if anybody else over filtered their tanks ? And if so, by how much ? I have : - 75 Gallon Tank- ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Black Ghost Knifefish
Black Ghost Knifefish
White Cloud Mountain Minnow
White Cloud Mountain Minnow
Reply
Old 08-30-2011, 03:15 PM   #1
 
stevenjohn21's Avatar
 
Over Filtering

Just wondered if anybody else over filtered their tanks ? And if so, by how much ?


I have : -

75 Gallon Tank- 2x Rena XP-3 & 1x Emperor 400 = 1100GPH

20 Gallon Tank- 1x Penguin 350 & Penguin sponge filter = 520GPH

10 Gallon Tank - 1x Pengiun 200 = 200GPH
stevenjohn21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 03:22 PM   #2
 
without meaning to sound rude, why bother? I understand some fish are large waste producers and need lots of filtration to handle the ammonia. However, not many common tropical fish come from fast moving waters; therefore won't appreciate the high rate of water movement
sik80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 03:30 PM   #3
 
stevenjohn21's Avatar
 
You dont sound rude, it was just a thought as i know some people decide to take down some tanks and are left with filters so maybe they used them for the time being in other tanks along with their existing filter.
My 75 Gallon tank happens to be a turtle tank and my 20 gallon tank houses Etheostoma Caeruleum which are use to fast flowing waters. My 10 gallon is just for feeder platys so i have no reason to over filter that one but its the only filter i have spare.
stevenjohn21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 03:31 PM   #4
zof
 
zof's Avatar
 
Do you keep fish in these things??!?!? You have a 15 to 20 x turn over in your tanks every hour... I consider my breeder setup over filtered but thats because it has about 150-200 gallons worth of filter material for a 100 gallon setup, although my flow is probably only about 2-3x volume per hour. I think its better to have more material for bacteria to grow then it is to push water past it faster, of course the opposite is true for mechanical filtration.
zof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 03:35 PM   #5
 
stevenjohn21's Avatar
 
The GPH i gave are what the manufacturers guides are. All my filters are stuffed with filter floss so there is no way they produce that much GPH. I dont have any dead spots in the tank though thats for sure !
stevenjohn21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 11:12 AM   #6
 
Byron's Avatar
 
It sounds as though you have reasons for "over-filtration," such as turtles, etc. So I'll just add a couple of general comments for the benefit of others reading this thread.

Filtration must be suited to the aquarium, in terms of type, media [mechanical, biological, chemical] and flow rate. Too much "filtration" is as bad as too little; neither is beneficial but may often be very detrimental.

Several factors affect filtration, and these should determine the type of filter needed. Aquarium size and fish load, not only numbers of fish but species. Live plants, again both quantity and species [slow growing filter less than fast growing].

Moving more water through the filter faster will usually result in less efficient/effective filtration because the pollutants in the water are moving through the media too fast.

Some fish species cannot manage with excessive water movement and they will be stressed and prone to health problems and likely premature death; most forest fish are in this group. The same is true in opposite, if the fish in the aquarium require water currents (Hillstream Loach for instance) this must be provided or the fish will be weakened and more prone to health issues.

A given sized tank should always be aquascaped for the specific fish to be included. And this includes the choice of filter.

Byron.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 11:42 AM   #7
 
I'll just expand on Byron's post to emphasize that increased filter horsepower (gph) does NOT mean increased filtration - it just means increased water flow. As a matter of fact, increased water flow usually means less actual filtration - as Byron pointed out, water moving so swiftly through media usually allows small particulate matter to pass right through.
Increased filtration usually requires slower water flow and finer filtration media.
Most of the fish we have were tank or pond raised. Even those from the wild are most often from pools, ponds, ditches, etc. where water flow is all but nonexistent. Very few come from raging rivers. There are some exceptions. Even fish used to swift currents will do better in static pools, than fish used to static pools will do in swift current where they constantly struggle.
Perhaps just my opinion, but in most cases we need to have true increased water filtration with a minimum of water flow/current. One of the reasons I like the AquaClear design is that it's reduced water flow setting results in re-filtration within the filter box. I'm also in favor of using some type of baffle to reduce the return flow to the tank. I use simple 'free' water bottles (instruction on this forum) with holes punched with a soldering iron. This breaks the return flow and most is against the back wall of the tank.

AbbeysDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 03:34 PM   #8
 
stevenjohn21's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
I'll just expand on Byron's post to emphasize that increased filter horsepower (gph) does NOT mean increased filtration - it just means increased water flow. As a matter of fact, increased water flow usually means less actual filtration - as Byron pointed out, water moving so swiftly through media usually allows small particulate matter to pass right through.

By placing a sponge over the intake tube and stuffing the filter cartridges (2 of them) full of floss like i have done does mean increased filtration though. If i was to use what others think is the correct size filter for my 10 gallon tank and then using a pre filter and stuffing the insides with floss it would have a flow rate of what a 5 gallon tank should have.
stevenjohn21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 03:54 PM   #9
 
I dunno...your original post boasted very high flow rates and you asked if others ALSO over filtered...

75 Gallon Tank- 2x Rena XP-3 & 1x Emperor 400 = 1100GPH = 14.6x
20 Gallon Tank- 1x Penguin 350 & Penguin sponge filter = 520GPH = 26x
10 Gallon Tank - 1x Pengiun 200 = 200GPH = 50x

The notion that we need high flow rates for good filtration is wrong. Byron, for instance, has some large tanks with plants and nothing more than a bubbling sponge filter. There are tanks out there with nothing more than a bubble up UGF. I have managed a 60g with crystal clear water using a 100gph HOB (<=2x).

You are correct that to some degree, adding finer media reduces the flow some, while in some cases, straining the motor. The only way to know for sure would be to do testing, which few are likely to do.
AbbeysDad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 04:04 PM   #10
 
stevenjohn21's Avatar
 
I just feel that a higher flow rate going through as much media as you can manage to put in the filter would be better all round .
Posted via Mobile Device
stevenjohn21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Enough Filtering for a 55g burnsbabe Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 9 08-18-2010 10:05 AM
Need better filtering fredandfred Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 08-28-2009 09:05 AM
Over Filtering? JohnnyD44 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 8 04-04-2009 10:13 AM
I have a few questions about filtering... dave12678 Saltwater Aquarium Equipment 3 04-02-2007 09:36 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 AM.