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post #11 of 29 Old 08-27-2010, 10:37 AM
the hearter aint that horrible to look at but just not natural looking in the tank thats all =)

5x2x2 aro,highfin bat,fei feng,ST,albino tinfoil,c.perch
4x1.5x1.5 planted tetras,harlequins,
otto,WMM,2 types of celebes rainbows,rcs,amano, bamboo,red ramhorns,MTS
3.5x2.5x2 flowerhorn,pleco
3x1.5x1.5 russel's lion,blue cleaner,sixline and leopard wrasse,maroon clown pair,green chromis,scorpion,tiger cowrie,turbo,lyretail anthias,jewel,anemone,star polyp,marbled and giant green mushi,zoa
2x1x1 nano sw shrimps
22 May 2012
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post #12 of 29 Old 08-27-2010, 11:14 AM
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Inga, your tank looks great! As far as the heater goes, you can always do what many of us do. Tilt it horizontally instead of vertically, and push it down lower. My heaters sit about an inch up from the substrate, in the back of the tank. The plants hide it completely, and being horizontal disperses the heat more evenly than it does when the heater is vertical. Sweet looking tank!

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post #13 of 29 Old 08-27-2010, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by aunt kymmie View Post
Inga, your tank looks great! As far as the heater goes, you can always do what many of us do. Tilt it horizontally instead of vertically, and push it down lower. My heaters sit about an inch up from the substrate, in the back of the tank. The plants hide it completely, and being horizontal disperses the heat more evenly than it does when the heater is vertical. Sweet looking tank!

Yeah, I am thinking of doing that. I just wonder, how do you guys check it to make sure it is working then? I mean, other then checking the temps. I am thinking of that day when mine started making an odd noise and I looked back and saw it bubbling. If it was under the plants, I might not have been able to see it well enough before it exploded or something. Yup! I am a little paranoid after that incident. lol
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post #14 of 29 Old 08-28-2010, 12:42 PM
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It won't be under, just behind, the plants. Bubbles would be seen.

I check temp regularly. And I have two of the best systems for this. On my 90g I have an Eheim with a heating unit included, so there is a digital thermometer that sits on the top of the canister filter and gives the current temp; this is easy to see and read.

On the 115g I have two internal heaters, one at either end, and one of them is the Fluval model that has a LCD display showing the current temp of the water; a green background means it is within 1 degree either way of the set temp, blue means it is cooler than 1 degree, red that it is warmer than 1 degree. I really like this heater, by just glancing at the colour in the corner I can instantly know the temp is OK (or not as the case may be, as during the hot spells when it rises a bit).

On the other tanks, I have the floating thermometers stuck in a front corner with a suction cup; harder to read (with my old eyes anyway).

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 05:57 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post

On the other tanks, I have the floating thermometers stuck in a front corner with a suction cup; harder to read (with my old eyes anyway).

Byron.
LOL Yeah, my old eyes are part of my problem with this as well. I did move my heater but it is not quite as low. It is still visible from behind the wood, If I look. It too has a top that shows either Green or Red depending on temp. A good visual for me to remember to check it. It is a lot less obvious now though and unless you are looking for it behind the wood and leaves, you wouldn't see it. Thanks for that hint. It does look much better.

I still think I need more plants though. I am thinking of getting rid of the Rotala as to me, it looks raggedy. I have planted a Sword behind it, and in front of the sponge filter. As that fills out, I will see how it looks, maybe the Rotala will go.

I have also been throwing around the idea of getting rid of the HOB filter altogether. Just having the sponge? What are your thoughts on that. Is that an acceptable idea for a 60 gallon tank, or do you think it needs both?
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post #16 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 01:59 PM
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LOL Yeah, my old eyes are part of my problem with this as well. I did move my heater but it is not quite as low. It is still visible from behind the wood, If I look. It too has a top that shows either Green or Red depending on temp. A good visual for me to remember to check it. It is a lot less obvious now though and unless you are looking for it behind the wood and leaves, you wouldn't see it. Thanks for that hint. It does look much better.

I still think I need more plants though. I am thinking of getting rid of the Rotala as to me, it looks raggedy. I have planted a Sword behind it, and in front of the sponge filter. As that fills out, I will see how it looks, maybe the Rotala will go.

I have also been throwing around the idea of getting rid of the HOB filter altogether. Just having the sponge? What are your thoughts on that. Is that an acceptable idea for a 60 gallon tank, or do you think it needs both?
I certainly agree on the filters. I am not a fan of HOB filters on planted tanks, and a sponge is sufficient with plants.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 02:01 PM
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I certainly agree on the filters. I am not a fan of HOB filters on planted tanks, and a sponge is sufficient with plants.
Any recommendations on a sponge filter for a 10-15 gal?

:[ I'm a bad man
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post #18 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 02:45 PM
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Any recommendations on a sponge filter for a 10-15 gal?
A very basic sponge will work; they need an air pump. I have a double sponge on my 20g, just two sponges about 5 inches in length I think side by side. I bought it years ago. On my 33g I have an Eheim sponge, it is a basic sponge filter but in a housing with a small morot rather than needing an air pump. I've had it for 20 years too, and someone here mentioned they no longer make this model. Shame, it is a super little filter.

A suggeston on the air pump, in case you are not aware of this. It is always good to have a bleeder line, which means using a valve with 2 (or more) outlets, one of which will be connected to the sponge filter, and one will have a short piece of tubing with an old airstone on the end, that just hanges or lays on the shelf/floor, whatever. You can then adjust the air in the tank's sponge filter, and have the "bleeder" line open a bit. This allows the air pump to work at full power. I read sometime ago that air pumps will work longer and better if they are full open. With just one sponge filter you could control it with a valve but you would then be blocking the air from the pump. Hope that makes sense.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 08-29-2010 at 02:49 PM.
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post #19 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 03:15 PM
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i think your tank looks really nice.
i like the idea about the heater i think that's a great one.

when you set up a new tank,hide an extra
sponge or two behind some decor,that way you have
something seeded for you next filter.
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post #20 of 29 Old 08-29-2010, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
A very basic sponge will work; they need an air pump. I have a double sponge on my 20g, just two sponges about 5 inches in length I think side by side. I bought it years ago. On my 33g I have an Eheim sponge, it is a basic sponge filter but in a housing with a small morot rather than needing an air pump. I've had it for 20 years too, and someone here mentioned they no longer make this model. Shame, it is a super little filter.

A suggeston on the air pump, in case you are not aware of this. It is always good to have a bleeder line, which means using a valve with 2 (or more) outlets, one of which will be connected to the sponge filter, and one will have a short piece of tubing with an old airstone on the end, that just hanges or lays on the shelf/floor, whatever. You can then adjust the air in the tank's sponge filter, and have the "bleeder" line open a bit. This allows the air pump to work at full power. I read sometime ago that air pumps will work longer and better if they are full open. With just one sponge filter you could control it with a valve but you would then be blocking the air from the pump. Hope that makes sense.

Not really but as I said, I am old. I don't suppose there is a diagram somewhere to show what you are sayings?

Quote:
Any recommendations on a sponge filter for a 10-15 gal?
Aquarium Internal Filters: Aquarium Technology Inc Hydro-Sponge Filter the filter for that size is actually only $5.00. The pumps are about $10.00 ish. It is a cheap and easy alternative to a large filter.

Byron, why do you have a canister filter on yours if you can get by with only a sponge? Will my water cloud up without the use of the HOB? Will I need to increase water changes or anything, that you know of?

Thanks Willow for the complement. I is certainly a work in progress but I am enjoying the ride.
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