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Nitrate filter

This is a discussion on Nitrate filter within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Yeah they stay small. Sand or gravel should be fine, but I lean more towards gravel since that is the substrate that is more ...

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Old 10-27-2009, 05:37 PM   #11
 
Yeah they stay small. Sand or gravel should be fine, but I lean more towards gravel since that is the substrate that is more natural to them. They exhibit the same behavior as Garra ruffa if kept in a group, they will clean your hand/ arm if you stick in in the water. They are fairly passionate about this. Its cute at first, but can get annoying if you are cleaning/scaping the tank. I had 3 a while back, but lost them and alot of other fish when my tank crashed. I very recently found a good deal on them online, and 6 of them are in the mail as we speak.
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Old 10-27-2009, 05:40 PM   #12
 
Please share the place that you are buying them from?
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:08 PM   #13
 
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:25 PM   #14
 
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No comments on this filter compared to any other filter. And I agree with Mikaila31 on the saving money comedy. But as for eliminating or reducing water changes, no filter except plants can really do this.

It is often said that we perform regular partial water changes (pwc) to reduce nitrates and maintain water stability. But this is not actually the prime reason for the pwc. The pwc removes the toxins than no filter can ever completely remove unless it is connected to a continual flow of new (fresh) water, and I suspect none of us has such a system. Plants will do this but only when the plant density is high and the fish load is very low. I recall one article (tried just now to dig it out, but can't remember where) about stocking levels being in the range of 9 neon tetras only in a 55g heavily-planted tank. The plants can take care of things in this situation, but most of us have far more fish in our aquaria.

What are these toxins? Fish waste. Fish excrete urine and solid waste regularly; one medium-size tetra is estimated to release its body weight in urine alone every 3-4 days. And if the solid waste is not removed, it breaks down into liquid, either in the filter or in the substrate, and there it stays--in the water column. There is no filter that can effectively remove all of this; over time, the fish is literally swimming around in it own excrement, and every day it becomes more and more. Only the pwc removes this and replaces it with fresh water.

There is an excellent article in the November 2009 issue of TFH describing the effect of various pwc on pollution levels in an aquarium. I won't go into the numbers here, but it makes for interesting reading.

Some aquarists think they can ignore a pwc until the nitrates or ammonia or something rises, then they do one. While this will obviously relieve the poor fish, it is not going to help long-term. And nitrate levels should be kept under 40ppm. Most on this forum have previously recommended 20ppm at the maximum; in a planted aquarium of course nitrate will remain at 10ppm or lower unless something occurs to affect the biological equilibrium.

So, this or any other filter may remove nitrates, but that is not the real problem, and you are still going to have to do a weekly pwc if you want healthy fish and are not prepared to drastically understock the aquarium.

Byron.
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Old 10-28-2009, 06:25 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by Teammuir1 View Post
OK I thought I saw it at one time listed to the right as an add..
but I have to ask has anyone used one?
I have done religious water changes.. ( it promotes healthier fish )
I just checked my nitrate level just earlier.....and its at 0
so I must have to ask... if your doing water changes then whats the need?
now I am wondering this because I will be building my 210 gallon soon.....
still working on were its going to be placed.. ( making Room ) lol
but I might need such a filter in the help of obtaining clean water conditions for
the Discus that I want to raise....
In my expierience with raising Discus, Frequent water changes are all that is needed to maintain low levels of nitrAtes. Levels above 30ppm can have negative effect on these fish and I have seen firsthand, Discus that were kept in waters with high levels of organics and fish that were kept in ideal conditions. If successful rearing of young is your aim, I would disregard those who suggest that elevated levels of nitrates (much above 20ppm) are no reason for concern. Also would not waste money on a product or device when i could/can, achieve the same results much cheaper and faster without it. That means more money for fish.8)
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Old 01-24-2010, 10:45 AM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
No comments on this filter compared to any other filter. And I agree with Mikaila31 on the saving money comedy. But as for eliminating or reducing water changes, no filter except plants can really do this.
I based the example on saving money on my actual two aquariums. You can actually see them here Pictures of Aquarium Coral, Saltwater aquarium, FW tanks There is no exagerration in any way shape or form. Nope, not one bit. Of course not everyone will need to use distilled, RO, or salt water for thier water changes. I live where the tap water quality is poor so I certainly need to as do many of my customers.

Also, the Aquaripure nitrate filters do in fact greatly reduce my need for water changes in both my 29 gallon planted tank and my 180 gallon reef tank. I do in fact do water changes maybe every 3 months and everything is healthy and vibrant with exceptional water quality.

If you don't want to take my word for it, how about one of my hundreds of very happy customers? Nitrate Removal Filter Testimonials

I know that now someone might accuse me of making them up or make any of a number of other disparaging remarks.

The bottom line is the Aquaripure works for a LOT of people as a part of very effective aquarium maintenance routine. There are other ways to go about it and there are a lot of other products and either someone wants to try it or they don't. The Aquaripure works very well and EXACTLY as advertised for the vast majority of customers who try it.
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Old 01-24-2010, 01:09 PM   #17
 
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Originally Posted by Aquaripure View Post
I based the example on saving money on my actual two aquariums. You can actually see them here Pictures of Aquarium Coral, Saltwater aquarium, FW tanks There is no exagerration in any way shape or form. Nope, not one bit. Of course not everyone will need to use distilled, RO, or salt water for thier water changes. I live where the tap water quality is poor so I certainly need to as do many of my customers.

Also, the Aquaripure nitrate filters do in fact greatly reduce my need for water changes in both my 29 gallon planted tank and my 180 gallon reef tank. I do in fact do water changes maybe every 3 months and everything is healthy and vibrant with exceptional water quality.

If you don't want to take my word for it, how about one of my hundreds of very happy customers? Nitrate Removal Filter Testimonials

I know that now someone might accuse me of making them up or make any of a number of other disparaging remarks.

The bottom line is the Aquaripure works for a LOT of people as a part of very effective aquarium maintenance routine. There are other ways to go about it and there are a lot of other products and either someone wants to try it or they don't. The Aquaripure works very well and EXACTLY as advertised for the vast majority of customers who try it.
The issue is not one of money or nitrates. There is, to my knowledge, no filter or product on the market that can remove urine from aquarium water, and that is the sole reason for partial water changes. The extent of necessary partial water changes depends upon the fish load in relation to the water volume in the aquarium, and whether or not there are plants. Removing nitrates is not removing urine and liquified solid waste from the water. Only plants can do this, but in very limited amounts so the fish load must be low for this to work. I would welcome any scientific evidence that urine is somehow extracted from the water passing through this or any filter.
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Old 01-24-2010, 01:45 PM   #18
 
I think all of us would cheerfully give up the need to do any pwc's or even reduce them to once every 3 months. My take on pwc's is that it removes items you might not be aware of in your crystal clear water, the said bad stuff not being visible. Having crystal clear water is not a test for negative "stuff" in your water; we don't have tests for everything in the water and I suspect we are still not aware of biological ecology of what is happening in our individual tanks.

The only system I can think of that would enable us lazy types to avoid water changes is to have dedicated plumbing where the tank can automatically be drained and topped up, daily at around 5% to 10%, and the anti-chlorine additive being added automatically along with the water change. The unit could be set for an automatic monthly 20% change; this would definitely be pricey but sure worth it.
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Old 01-24-2010, 02:19 PM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
The issue is not one of money or nitrates. There is, to my knowledge, no filter or product on the market that can remove urine from aquarium water, and that is the sole reason for partial water changes. The extent of necessary partial water changes depends upon the fish load in relation to the water volume in the aquarium, and whether or not there are plants. Removing nitrates is not removing urine and liquified solid waste from the water. Only plants can do this, but in very limited amounts so the fish load must be low for this to work. I would welcome any scientific evidence that urine is somehow extracted from the water passing through this or any filter.

Using anaerobic bacteria to process wastewater containing both urine and solid waste has a tremendous amount of scientific research behind it going back decades. The only difference between an aquarium nitrate filter and large scale anaerobic digester is that digesters sometimes process more of the solid stuff. This is NOT true of all the anaerobic plants and many treat a wide range of pollutants as the bacteria actually break down a lot of different pollutants in addition to urine, solid waste, and nitrates.

For the Wikipedia entry on it see Anaerobic digestion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here is an extensive United Nations paper on the subject Bioconversion of organic residues for rural communities

Other websites and scientific articles are:
ArchaeaSolutions Scientific Papers regarding Arkea
Trends in Biotechnology - Challenge of psychrophilic anaerobic wastewater treatment
May 2001: Anaerobic wastewater treatment reviewed
G1881 Generating Methane Gas From Manure | University of Missouri Extension
Turning manure into gold
Science Links Japan | The Application of Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment System in Paper Industry.

Aquaripure's explanation is here More on Nitrate Removal

These are just what searching for 1 minute on Google has turned up. No offense but obviously you didn't try at all to find any scientific research showing anaerobic bacteria can and do in fact remove urine among other things. Before you make statements such as, "I would welcome any scientific evidence that urine is somehow extracted from the water passing through this or any filter" perhaps you should spend 1 minute looking it up on Google. I do not want to inflame anyone but really, you made that statement with such authority and certainty that many people might believe it.

If you want more, spend a few hours at a university library and I am certain you will have hundreds if not thousands of actual scientific articles in respected scientific journals on the use of bacteria to process and completely remove urine, solid waste, nitrates, and other harmful compunds from wastewater.

Last edited by Aquaripure; 01-24-2010 at 02:24 PM..
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Old 01-24-2010, 02:22 PM   #20
 
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Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
I think all of us would cheerfully give up the need to do any pwc's or even reduce them to once every 3 months. My take on pwc's is that it removes items you might not be aware of in your crystal clear water, the said bad stuff not being visible. Having crystal clear water is not a test for negative "stuff" in your water; we don't have tests for everything in the water and I suspect we are still not aware of biological ecology of what is happening in our individual tanks.

The only system I can think of that would enable us lazy types to avoid water changes is to have dedicated plumbing where the tank can automatically be drained and topped up, daily at around 5% to 10%, and the anti-chlorine additive being added automatically along with the water change. The unit could be set for an automatic monthly 20% change; this would definitely be pricey but sure worth it.

Aquaripure's explanation on why frequent partial water changes are NOT needed is here More on Nitrate Removal I have many customers who have had Aquaripure filters for years who will back me up.
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