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Newbie question! Will my tank be sufficiently aerated?

This is a discussion on Newbie question! Will my tank be sufficiently aerated? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by joe1992w Thanks for all the help and advice it's very much appreciated. i don't know if you noticed my edit of ...

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Newbie question! Will my tank be sufficiently aerated?
Old 04-19-2010, 03:47 PM   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe1992w View Post
Thanks for all the help and advice it's very much appreciated. i don't know if you noticed my edit of my least post that gave a link to the values of my tap water in my area but you didn't mention it and i was hoping you could give me some more advice if it's needed that directly relates to my tap water. thanks alot
I did miss it, thanks for pointing it out. That is good that they provide that list of what's in the water. I'll just mention a couple of things from the list.

Iron, copper, manganese and lead are heavy metals and at specific levels toxic to all fish and plants (and all life organisms for that matter). The first three are also micro-nutrients required by plants to grow. However, you don't want lead in the aquarium, so like most of us you use a water conditioner that detoxifies heavy metals (most do but some may not, they will say on the label if they do). The micro-nutrients can be added via liquid plant fertilizer in safe levels.

You have nitrate at 44 mg per litre, which my conversion chart says is about 44-45 ppm. That's high; most of us prefer nitrate to be under 20 ppm. Most (but not all) of the common fish can manage with 40 ppm but they shouldn't have to. The solution here is to use a water conditioner that detoxifies nitrates. Nitrites are also mentioned though very low, but again a good water conditioner will handle that too. [More on conditioners in a moment.]

The calcium and magnesium are the minerals that create hardness in water. And your water is very hard according to these numbers, and the nice conversion chart they provide ["Convert your water hardness" arrow]. The pH at 7.2 seems low for such hardness, but there are chemistry reasons for this that I frankly don't fully understand so I'll leave it.

Where this gets us is that livebearers will do fine in your water as is (using a conditioner of course). So will most plants. Some of the tetras will manage, but many will find it too hard long-term. The best way to soften hard water is with Reverse Osmosis (RO) unit. We can go into that if you ask. If you check the species profiles we have, the water parameters and the fish's adaptability is noted for most of them, so that will give you an idea of what fish you can easily acquire when the tank is cycled.

For plants, Vallisneria does exceptionally well in hard water; it can assimilate carbon from carbonates as well as the more usual CO2 (carbon dioxide). Most of the stem plants will be OK, and the common swords like Echinodorus bleherae will do well.

On the conditioners, Seachem's Prime is one of the best for your situation; it handles chlorine, chloramine, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and heavy metals. You may find other brands in the UK [I'm sure Seachem is available there] but make sure they will handle what is needed; some do not.

Keep asking...we're all here to assist when we can.

Byron.
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:01 PM   #12
 
again thanks for the helpfull post i have a conditioner here that says " Removes harmfull chlorine and chloramines, detoxify heavy metals, removes excess ammonia"
it doesn't mention nitrates or nitrites which isn't ideal. but it does say it removes ammonia which i presumed was bad at an early cycling stage as bacteria requires it to grow(Correct me if i am grossly incorrect)
The impression i get from all of the reading i've been doing on the forums is that Fish stores in the US and canada are 100% better than the ones in my local area, i feel that if i asked for Vallisneria i could end up with anything they are trying to get rid of in the shop at that time. is there any planting arangements that are preferable to livebearers for their fry or themselves? i've been recomended by a friend who used to keep fish that "Killi fish" make excellent fish to keep, do you have any knowledge on this matter? thanks again

Last edited by joe1992w; 04-19-2010 at 04:06 PM..
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:29 PM   #13
 
http://www.seapets.co.uk/products/aq...ps-6-in-1.html
if i could find this product in my LFS would it do the job?
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:18 PM   #14
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe1992w View Post
http://www.seapets.co.uk/products/aq...ps-6-in-1.html
if i could find this product in my LFS would it do the job?
Most on here suggest that test strips are not as accurate as liquid test kits; I've personally never used them, as I take the general concensus and buy liquid.

I saw a side item on the linked page for Nutrafin test kits, and clicking on that, there is the Mini Master Test Kit which has the four you most need, same as the API. I know it is L9 more [closest I can get to a "pound" symbol] but you may find it on websites for less.

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Old 04-19-2010, 08:42 PM   #15
 
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Quote:
again thanks for the helpfull post i have a conditioner here that says " Removes harmfull chlorine and chloramines, detoxify heavy metals, removes excess ammonia"
it doesn't mention nitrates or nitrites which isn't ideal. but it does say it removes ammonia which i presumed was bad at an early cycling stage as bacteria requires it to grow(Correct me if i am grossly incorrect)
Ammonia in the tap water is something different from ammonia produced naturally in the aquarium. The latter is handled by bacteria and plants that need nitrogen and prefer it as ammonium [ammonia becomes ammonium in acidic water, or in basic water like yours plants take the ammonia and convert it to ammonium which they then assimilate as their nitrogen nutrient]. When ammonia is in tap water and this is added during a partial water change, there is a sudden influx of ammonia that can cause stress to fish because it takes the bacteria about nine hours to multiply and while I am not certain how long plants take to assimilate this influx it is almost certainly not quicker. Ammonia detoxifier in the conditioner handles this sort of issue by detoxifying the ammonia into ammonium which the bacteria and plants can both use. Ammonium by the way is basically non-toxic to fish and plants.

Quote:
The impression i get from all of the reading i've been doing on the forums is that Fish stores in the US and canada are 100% better than the ones in my local area, i feel that if i asked for Vallisneria i could end up with anything they are trying to get rid of in the shop at that time. is there any planting arangements that are preferable to livebearers for their fry or themselves?
It may be your area, as I believe from what I've read elsewhere that there are some fantastic fish stores in the UK. Items in PF magazine have made me envious. We have many stores over here that regularly mislead aquarists, you will find horror stories in threads on this forum from time to time.

If you want to have fry survive, the best thing is floating plants. Proper floating plants like Ceratopteris, Frogbit, etc., but even simpler and more likely available are stem plants like Cabomba, Wisteria (Hygrophila difformis), Pennywort and many others; stem plants will "float" and live without being anchored in the substrate, or they can be planted in the substrate and allowed to grow up and then across the surface, though the lower leaves usually die off when grown in this manner.

Vallisneria is a great livebearing tank plant, because it is hardy, fast growing, and loves hard water. Mollies and some other livebearers love to browse the leaves for algae and other food.

Quote:
i've been recomended by a friend who used to keep fish that "Killi fish" make excellent fish to keep, do you have any knowledge on this matter?
I had killifish back in the 1980's. Neat fish. A member of the local society specialized in them and had tanks of fish and traded with members of the AKA (American Killifhish Association). The species I had required soft acidic water, they were African. But some come from brackish water I believe, so there is probably variability. I see we have no killifish profiles (yet), but you might find some info in the killifish section of the forum:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/c...ds-atherinids/

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Old 04-30-2010, 03:26 PM   #16
 
sorry to dig up my old thread but, on the recomendation of yourself i bought an API master test kit,
For 24 hours now testing every 8 hours my ammonia levels have been at 1.00ppm
NO2 5.0ppm
NO3 160ppm

All but ammonia are the max on the scales,

my worry is that i have been using too much fish flake for an ammonia source and it is still decaying in my gravel somewhere maintaining high levels all the toxins.

i have no live plants in my tank yet as i didn't want to risk damage to my biological filter by taking away it's ammonia source but am now contemplaiting adding lots of live plants to try and solve the issue.

as of now i have stopped adding flakes and i am going to continue measuring the levels untill i see some progress and then report back here, i have not conducted a water change yet and detoxified all my starting water from Chlorine and heavy metals, i also added a king british bacteria aid which seems to have been no help,

any suggestions from the people in the know here would be a great help, thanks as always, Joe
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Old 04-30-2010, 06:35 PM   #17
 
also i have read that a slightly acidic water makes ammonia into ammonium and the second be much less toxic to fish, i have a very high Ph local which is also very hard with calcium and magnesium salts which i'm pretty sure will act as tough buffers, i've heard that bog wood can help lower Ph slowly and by only small amounts is this true? also will using king british "safe guard" to chemically lower Ammonia levels effect the growth of my biological filter, i was told that most ammonia treatments wouldn't as they convert ammonia into ammonium again is this true?
Thanks
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Old 05-01-2010, 05:38 AM   #18
 
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Those numbers are on the high side but since you're doing a fishless cycle you don't really have anything to worry about. It seems like the tank isn't quite cycled yet as you still have ammonia and nitrite readings. What you've heard about ammonia in an acidic environment is true, but if you have very hard water it will be very difficult to lower pH with only something like bogwood. However, once the tank is fully cycled you shouldn't have ammonia issues to deal with anyway, so I wouldn't worry about fiddling with your water parameters.
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Old 05-01-2010, 05:41 AM   #19
 
thanks, but my biggest concern isn't the fact that i still have high readings it is that i now haven't put flakes in my tank for 2 days and i still have the exact same levels of ammonia present asif i have no biological filter what so ever
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Old 05-01-2010, 05:43 AM   #20
 
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Well you surely do since your nitrates are so high. Whatever fish food is still in there is going to continue to decay and give off ammonia so if you didn't have any beneficial bacteria, I would have expected to see your ammonia level rise in that same period of time rather than stay the same.
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