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post #21 of 25 Old 03-31-2012, 01:34 PM
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I have a tank that has been going for 2 weeks , i have plants baut no fish yes ... Do i still have to put clorine remover in when i do put in fish ? Or would it have gone by now ? ( i never put any in in the 1st place as no fish yet)
If you only have chlorine in your tap water, then it will have dissipated out by now. However, many municipalities are also using chloramine which does not out-gas so if it is present you need a water conditioner than detoxifies chlorine and chloramine.

If you change or add any water, regardless of fish, from now on use a conditioner. Chlorine (and chloramine obviously) will kill any bacteria now established, and there is bound to be some.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #22 of 25 Old 04-01-2012, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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if you only have chlorine in your tap water, then it will have dissipated out by now. However, many municipalities are also using chloramine which does not out-gas so if it is present you need a water conditioner than detoxifies chlorine and chloramine.

If you change or add any water, regardless of fish, from now on use a conditioner. Chlorine (and chloramine obviously) will kill any bacteria now established, and there is bound to be some.

yea i usually do that but thought as i wasnt adding fish for a few weeks ... But yea at the time i forgot about the friendly bacteria

good tips ;;; thanks
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post #23 of 25 Old 04-03-2012, 08:19 PM Thread Starter
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Peat moss

Im gonna put fish in my new jewel vision 180 l tank tonight
the amonia spike is ove and so is the nitrie and i changes 50 l of water last night ... Whats the deal with peat moss .. I read tetras like it ??
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post #24 of 25 Old 04-03-2012, 08:55 PM
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Im gonna put fish in my new jewel vision 180 l tank tonight
the amonia spike is ove and so is the nitrie and i changes 50 l of water last night ... Whats the deal with peat moss .. I read tetras like it ??
Peat moss is placed in the filter (in a mesh bag) and it adds tannins to the water which will increase acidity and thus lower the pH. This is often used to create "blackwater." As many (but not all) tetra come from such water, this is one way to meintain them and usually will encourage them to spawn. Some use this for discus and other similar fish. The peat obviously wears off, depending upon the initial hardness and pH of the water, as it becomes exhausted. It has to be replaced regularly. It also tends to stain the water a bit, yellowish/brownish, much like wood initially does.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #25 of 25 Old 04-03-2012, 09:06 PM Thread Starter
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peat moss is placed in the filter (in a mesh bag) and it adds tannins to the water which will increase acidity and thus lower the ph. This is often used to create "blackwater." as many (but not all) tetra come from such water, this is one way to meintain them and usually will encourage them to spawn. Some use this for discus and other similar fish. The peat obviously wears off, depending upon the initial hardness and ph of the water, as it becomes exhausted. It has to be replaced regularly. It also tends to stain the water a bit, yellowish/brownish, much like wood initially does.

thank you
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