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New here - cycling a 55 - duh

This is a discussion on New here - cycling a 55 - duh within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Welcome back - I'm in a similar situation with a long hiatus between tanks. It seems to me there is so much more known ...

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New here - cycling a 55 - duh
Old 12-14-2012, 06:58 AM   #11
 
Welcome back - I'm in a similar situation with a long hiatus between tanks. It seems to me there is so much more known today about the chemistry of tropical fishing keeping than there was in the 70's. Despite the ignornance, I did have some good breeding successes. Keeping Discus alive more than a couple of months was considered the holy grail! I was never so fortunate.

With all the tools available today, I'm looking forward to expanding with a 75g here within a month or so. This forum is a great source for the planning stage.
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Old 12-16-2012, 02:33 PM   #12
 
Well the tank seems to have stabilized, beginning wise with a pH range of 7.2 to 7.3 which will likely lower with time as the substrate/plants mature. I am going to add a few rocks today to create some hiding spots for cats and anchor for Java ferns. I could not locate the ideal Cory cats so am picking up 6 Julii tomorrow along with 3 Bristlenose.

As I posted in another thread, I'd like to add some wood, which I've never done and am in foreign waters regarding selection and procedure.

Next Saturday I pick up the 10 baby discus and hope they thrive.

We raise composting worms for our farm so I'm going to try my hand at raising some white worms
(Enchytraeus albidus) and some California blackworms. I could probably feed the larger worms but chopping them up could prove messy.

Any comments/advice welcome.
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Old 12-16-2012, 07:11 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Timjwilson View Post
Well the tank seems to have stabilized, beginning wise with a pH range of 7.2 to 7.3 which will likely lower with time as the substrate/plants mature. I am going to add a few rocks today to create some hiding spots for cats and anchor for Java ferns. I could not locate the ideal Cory cats so am picking up 6 Julii tomorrow along with 3 Bristlenose.

As I posted in another thread, I'd like to add some wood, which I've never done and am in foreign waters regarding selection and procedure.

Next Saturday I pick up the 10 baby discus and hope they thrive.

We raise composting worms for our farm so I'm going to try my hand at raising some white worms
(Enchytraeus albidus) and some California blackworms. I could probably feed the larger worms but chopping them up could prove messy.

Any comments/advice welcome.
I must caution you on the "julii" corys. These will not manage at the warmer temperature (82F) required for discus. Most corys won't, in fact.

It is doubtful the "julii" are actually Corydoras julii, as most fish sold in stores as "julii" are in fact Corydoras trilineatus, as it mentions in the profiles (along with ways to distinguish them). But C. trilineatus also cannot last at warm temperatures.

I suggest holding off on corys until you can obtain one of the (few) species that do well in warmer water. C. sterbai is one f the best, and this one is available locally from time to time.

Byron.
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Old 12-21-2012, 08:45 PM   #14
 
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I must caution you on the "julii" corys. These will not manage at the warmer temperature (82F) required for discus. Most corys won't, in fact.

It is doubtful the "julii" are actually Corydoras julii, as most fish sold in stores as "julii" are in fact Corydoras trilineatus, as it mentions in the profiles (along with ways to distinguish them). But C. trilineatus also cannot last at warm temperatures.

I suggest holding off on corys until you can obtain one of the (few) species that do well in warmer water. C. sterbai is one f the best, and this one is available locally from time to time.

Byron.
I think I got genuine Julii. Take a look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISb0Xy4y24g

I compromised the temperature at 81. We'll see....
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Old 12-21-2012, 09:09 PM   #15
 
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I think I got genuine Julii. Take a look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISb0Xy4y24g

I compromised the temperature at 81. We'll see....
I am inclined to think those are C. trilineatus, but not confident enough to bet on it. May I ask where you got them? Knowing the local stores, I will know if they might be C. julii which would have to be wild caught. These two species can be very variable.

I'm sorry, but I cannot advise keeping these guys that warm. Their physiology will weaken.
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Old 12-22-2012, 01:06 AM   #16
 
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I am inclined to think those are C. trilineatus, but not confident enough to bet on it. May I ask where you got them? Knowing the local stores, I will know if they might be C. julii which would have to be wild caught. These two species can be very variable.

I'm sorry, but I cannot advise keeping these guys that warm. Their physiology will weaken.
I bought them privately and yes they were wild caught. I discovered this after loading them into the car. The person I got them from said he has kept them warmer than that, however I have in mind to lower the temp a couple of degrees after(if) the discuss put on some size.

I realize this is against the current discus dogma.
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:23 PM   #17
 
Well, I've got the discus home and they will be lucky to survive. I checked the pH of the bag water at 3.6. This is of almost fermentive numbers and can be indicative of high fungi volume. I had no choice but to put them into my 7.1 pH water.

My O2 is at 7.2 and I'm going to aerate for a little while with the thought that extra O2 may help them recover. If this is wrong....let me know.

Tim
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:28 PM   #18
 
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Most all fish, not just discus, can't tolerate extreme abrupt changes in pH, TDS/GH, or temperature. So acclimate them slowly, using the drip method or mixing the water slowly.
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:55 PM   #19
 
Any opinion on the O2 level and aeration?
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Old 12-22-2012, 05:42 PM   #20
 
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Any opinion on the O2 level and aeration?
Probably a good idea. If you read my articles on hardness/pH, TDS, and stress,in each is mentioned the effect these have on fish and how oxygen is related.
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